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Shape/Volume

Lucy Adjoa Armah

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

To fully understand the significance of “volume” in fashion, it is necessary to discuss everything from the exaggerated shoulders in the trend for tailored power dressing in the 1980s to the unconventional draping and pleating of Issey Miyake. The prism of volume enables the unpacking of aesthetic traditions in dress and fashion that appear to have little in common. When designers utilize volume, they are often presenting a fantasy from a distant land or a reimagined time. When individuals choose

Guy Laroche

Matina Kousidi

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Marithé + François Girbaud (house)

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Issey Miyake

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

Clothes … speak many languages … and have to be seen on the outside … as well as felt on the inside.

East Asian Fashion Designers in Local and International Markets

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion is often equated with modern European high fashion, and since it is normally seen as a specifically Western development, its role in the creation of style by non-Western designers, especially by East Asian designers, used to be generally unrecognized and ignored. East Asians started to adopt a Western style of dress only recently. Western clothing and fashion appeared in Japan during the Meiji era (1868–1912), and it was a desired symbol of modernization encouraged by Emperor Meiji. Almos

Japanese Fashion*

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

During the Taisho period (1912–1926), wearing Western clothing continued to be a symbol of sophistication and an expression of modernity. It was in this period that working women such as bus conductors, nurses, and typists started wearing Western clothes in everyday life. By the beginning of the Showa period (1926–1989), men’s clothing had become largely Western, and by this time, the business suit was gradually becoming standard apparel for company employees. It took about a century for Western

Miyake, Issey

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Miyake laid the foundation in Paris for avant-garde designers worldwide, the Japanese ones in particular. He was showing in Paris long before other Japanese designers, and his presence was further pronounced by the emergence of two influential, norm-breaking designers. Rei Kawakubo, working under the label Comme des Garçons, and Yohji Yamamoto began to present their collections in Paris in 1981 along with the already-established Miyake, who is considered the founding father of the new fashion tre

Design Innovation by Japanese Designers Miyake, Kawakubo, and Yamamoto

Sandhya Lalloo-Morar

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Rarely has a concept in clothing design attracted the sort of dread and hysteria that deconstruction has incited since its inception in 1967. Deconstruction can be described as the literal dismantling of clothes in order to destroy fashion. The philosophy was aimed at un-building the constructs of a culture inherited from previous generations.Japanese designers Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto, and Rei Kawakubo have been widely regarded as innovators in the fashion world and leading exponents of deco

Type 2: Rei Kawakubo, Issey Miyake, and Yohji Yamamoto Construction of the Japanese Avant-Garde Fashion

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Japanese Revolution in Paris Fashion. Dress, Body, Culture 2004

Book chapter

Miyake was born in Hiroshima in 1939, the same year as Kenzo. Unlike Kenzo and Yamamoto who formally studied fashion at Bunka School of Fashion, Miyake graduated from one of art universities, Tama University, where he majored in graphic design. In 1965, after graduating from Tama, he went to Paris, three months after Kenzo. They knew each other in Tokyo (Quinn 1984: 12), and both studied tailoring and dressmaking at l’Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture for a year. In 1966, he landed an a

Seven: Japanese Innovation

Bradley Quinn

Source: Techno Fashion 2002

Book chapter

‘Body becomes dress becomes body,’ proclaimed Rei Kawakubo, as she tried to sum up her radical perception of clothes and their function.Rei Kawakubo was interviewed by Susannah Frankel in her book, Fashion Visionaries (2001), London: V&A Publications, p. 154. Blurring the boundaries between dress and the body itself is typical for her; it has been central to her work for three decades. Ever since she made her debut in Paris her enigmatic and provocative collections have sent shock waves resonatin

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