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Suzanne Lenglen

Jaclyn Pyper

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Suzanne Lenglen was a French tennis player and one of the first female celebrity athletes. Born in Paris in 1899, Suzanne developed her skills on the tennis courts of the French Riviera. Soon after her first win at Wimbledon in 1919, she began to be dressed both on and off the court by the up-and-coming couturier Jean Patou. Suzanne would dominate the international women’s tennis circuit in the 1920s, but her celebrity was equally built on her glamorous lifestyle, clothing, and temperamental pers

Patou, Jean

Amy de la Haye

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In 1914 Patou established a couture house at 7, rue St. Florentin, near the rue de la Paix. Although his first collection was prepared, it was never shown, as he went to serve as a captain in a French Zouave regiment during World War I. Following the cessation of hostilities Patou became a leading international couturier. He commissioned his fellow officer Bernard Boutet de Monvel, who was working for several fashion magazines, to illustrate many of his advertisements. Patou’s salon was decorated

Fragrances and Perfumes

Brian Moeran

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The development of modern perfume may be traced to the court of Louis XIV (1643–1715), whose palace at Versailles had no bathrooms. Quantities of perfume were used at court, primarily to mask odors. In the fifth century, an Arab perfumer, Avicenna, had pioneered the distillation of rose water. Arab perfumers established businesses in Granada, and from the eleventh century onwards, the crusaders brought back knowledge of Oriental fragrances to Europe. The first alcohol-based eau de toilette was l’

Art Nouveau and Art Deco

Lou Taylor

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

This appropriation of art nouveau styling coincided with the moment in the history of couture when a united business structure was firmly established by the Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne. Unrivaled elsewhere in the Western world, Paris couturiers dressed the women of international royal courts and high society including in Japan and tsarist Russia, the wives of the wealthiest international plutocrats, and the great actresses of the Paris stage. Commercial clients already included the

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