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The Art of Textiles

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Textiles are used by designers as their primary creative medium. For the designer, choosing the right fabrics for a particular design is one of the most important aspects of designing. Often the fabric itself can inspire the design; for example, soft, drapey fabric can inspire the designer to focus on gathers and ruffles. Most experienced designers can picture their designs completely finished and ready to go before the garments are done, and each and every one understands the importance of match

Orientalism in Fashion

Osman Ahmed

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

This essay explores the relationship with fashion and Orientalism as a modern study of Western culture, as well as an ancient dialogue between East and West that has laid the foundations for the modern fashion system. Designers discussed include Paul Poiret, Yves Saint Laurent, and John Galliano, who each represent various waves of Orientalism and the changing ways in which its appearance in fashion collections contributed to the course of fashion and design history.

The Edwardian Period and World War I 1900–1920

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

From 1900 to 1920, many societal, political, and technological changes occurred that dramatically altered life for many people. Innovations such as the telephone and cable cars and trolleys made communication and travel easier. With enhanced interest and access to college and university education, and increased variety and complexity of jobs, more people needed simpler, easier to acquire clothing. By the beginning of the 20th century, ready-to-wear clothing, offered in a variety of styles, quanti

The Edwardian Period and World War I, 1900–1920

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

1868–1944: The Japoniste Revolution, the Deorientalizing of the Orient and the Birth of Couture

Adam Geczy

Source: Fashion and Orientalism. Dress, Textiles and Culture from the 17th to the 21st Century, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Civilization! Read: ‘the era that has lost almost all its creative power…in jewellery as in furniture’; and in one or the other we are compelled to exhume or import. Import what? Indian bracelets of glass filament and Chinese earrings of cut paper? No. But more often the naïve taste that underlies their making.

Paul Poiret: Classic and New in the Struggle for Designer Mastery

Ilya Parkins

Source: Poiret, Dior and Schiaparelli. Fashion, Femininity and Modernity, 2012, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In a meditation on the accumulation of symbolic capital in the fields of cultural production, Bourdieu, who views fashion as one among many such fields, explains that the production of time is central to the work of distinguishing the artists: ‘To “make one’s name” (faire date) means making one’s mark, achieving recognition (in both senses) of one’s difference from other producers; at the same time, it means creating a new position beyond the positions presently occupied, ahead of them, in the av

Fashion Illustrators

Laird Borrelli

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

France

Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The French Revolution abolished the rigid dress etiquette and bureaucracy of the ancien régime fashion industry. Napoleon’s campaigns inspired fashions with soldierly details and created a vogue for exotic accessories. His imperial court ensured the survival of French luxury goods industries, while promoting a more modern silhouette. Napoleon encouraged pre-Revolutionary tastes for classical Greek and Roman styles, to glorify his own reign. The restoration of the Bourbon monarchy and the Romantic

Paris as a Fashion City

Martine Elzingre

Translated by Pierre Hodgson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Paris fashions—clothes, lingerie, accessories, and jewelry, together with other beauty products such as hairstyles, fragrances, and cosmetics—have come to dominate the world beyond the borders of France, as well as beyond Europe and indeed outside the West. In Paris itself, the two arts of dressing and seduction have thrived because innumerable ideas and techniques for applying those ideas have constantly been discovered—a continual process of experimentation.

Poiret, Paul

Caroline Rennolds Milbank

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Until the October 1908 publication of Les Robes de Paul Poiret, Poiret was merely an up-and-coming couturier, likely to assume a place in the hierarchy as secure as that of Doucet or Worth. However, the limited edition deluxe album of Poiret designs as envisioned and exquisitely rendered by new artist Paul Iribe would have far-reaching impact, placing Poiret in a new uncharted position, that of daringly inventive designer and arbiter of taste. Fashion presentation up to then had been quite straig

Art Nouveau and Art Deco

Lou Taylor

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

This appropriation of art nouveau styling coincided with the moment in the history of couture when a united business structure was firmly established by the Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne. Unrivaled elsewhere in the Western world, Paris couturiers dressed the women of international royal courts and high society including in Japan and tsarist Russia, the wives of the wealthiest international plutocrats, and the great actresses of the Paris stage. Commercial clients already included the

Paul Poiret's Minaret Style: Originality, Reproduction, and Art in Fashion

Nancy J. Troy

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2009, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

During his visit to America, Mr. Poiret was much astonished to see advertised in various shop windows Poiret gowns which he himself had never seen before. Needless to say, Mr. Poiret quickly identified these gowns as never having emanated from his establishment and the labels which were sewed in them as nothing but counterfeits of his original label. He immediately placed the matter in the hands of his attorney, who started an investigation which revealed the fact that not only were Poiret labels

Style: The Endless Desire for a New Look

Annette Lynch and Mitchell D. Strauss

Source: Changing Fashion. A Critical Introduction to Trend Analysis and Meaning, 2007, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The new fashionable figure is growing straighter and straighter, less bust, less hips, more waist, a wonderfully long, slender suppleness about the limbs … The long skirt … reveals plainly every line and curve of the leg from hip to ankle. The petticoat is obsolete, prehistoric. How slim, how graceful, how elegant women look! The leg has suddenly become fashionable.

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