Results: Text (12) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 12 of 12 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Capes and Cloaks

Emma Davenport

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

A cape or cloak is a layer of fabric that wraps around the body for warmth and protection and is with or without sleeves. While men have historically worn both as a military garment, they became popular as womenswear in the late 1800s. By the early 1900s, they had fallen out of fashion, replaced by a wider range of coat styles. On the catwalk, both are associated with adventure and intrigue, making them more of a romantic accessory than a daily necessity. While designers like Yves Saint Laurent a

Junya Watanabe

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Fashion and Surrealism

Victoria Rose Pass

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Surrealism, as an artistic movement, emerged in Paris in 1924 with the publication of the Surrealist Manifesto by the writer André Breton (1896–1966), but artists and writers had exhibited this sensibility long before. The notion of the uncanny is at the heart of surrealism. At its most basic, the aesthetic of the uncanny celebrates the beauty of combining images which are irreconcilable: the real and the imagined, the live and the dead, the organic and the inorganic. The uncanny is also at the c

Rei Kawakubo and Comme des Garçons

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

Vera Mackie (2003: 144)… women [in Japan] were condemned to be ‘mothers’ or ‘whores’.

East Asian Fashion Designers in Local and International Markets

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion is often equated with modern European high fashion, and since it is normally seen as a specifically Western development, its role in the creation of style by non-Western designers, especially by East Asian designers, used to be generally unrecognized and ignored. East Asians started to adopt a Western style of dress only recently. Western clothing and fashion appeared in Japan during the Meiji era (1868–1912), and it was a desired symbol of modernization encouraged by Emperor Meiji. Almos

Japanese Fashion*

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

During the Taisho period (1912–1926), wearing Western clothing continued to be a symbol of sophistication and an expression of modernity. It was in this period that working women such as bus conductors, nurses, and typists started wearing Western clothes in everyday life. By the beginning of the Showa period (1926–1989), men’s clothing had become largely Western, and by this time, the business suit was gradually becoming standard apparel for company employees. It took about a century for Western

Design Innovation by Japanese Designers Miyake, Kawakubo, and Yamamoto

Sandhya Lalloo-Morar

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Rarely has a concept in clothing design attracted the sort of dread and hysteria that deconstruction has incited since its inception in 1967. Deconstruction can be described as the literal dismantling of clothes in order to destroy fashion. The philosophy was aimed at un-building the constructs of a culture inherited from previous generations.Japanese designers Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto, and Rei Kawakubo have been widely regarded as innovators in the fashion world and leading exponents of deco

Gender

Gertrud Lehnert

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The basic distinction between female and male dress in the Western world is between women’s skirts and men’s bifurcated trousers. Only in the twentieth century was this abandoned—but in one direction, since, even today, men do not wear skirts, despite some attempts by fashion designers. This does not indicate that trousers are more natural for men, but that in the West, they denote supremacy and masculinity. From the late Middle Ages onwards, increasing emphasis was put on gender differentiation

Comme des Garçons

Claire Wilcox

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

I wanted to have some kind of job to earn money because at that time, having money meant being free. I never dreamt of being a fashion designer like other people. When I was young, it was just a way of earning a living by doing something I found I could do: making clothes and taking them around the shops to sell them. (Frankel, p. 8)

Dolce & Gabbana: Deep South

Barbara Vinken

Translated by Mark Hewson

Source: Fashion Zeitgeist. Trends and Cycles in the Fashion System 2005

Book chapter

Type 2: Rei Kawakubo, Issey Miyake, and Yohji Yamamoto Construction of the Japanese Avant-Garde Fashion

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Japanese Revolution in Paris Fashion. Dress, Body, Culture 2004

Book chapter

Miyake was born in Hiroshima in 1939, the same year as Kenzo. Unlike Kenzo and Yamamoto who formally studied fashion at Bunka School of Fashion, Miyake graduated from one of art universities, Tama University, where he majored in graphic design. In 1965, after graduating from Tama, he went to Paris, three months after Kenzo. They knew each other in Tokyo (Quinn 1984: 12), and both studied tailoring and dressmaking at l’Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture for a year. In 1966, he landed an a

Seven: Japanese Innovation

Bradley Quinn

Source: Techno Fashion 2002

Book chapter

‘Body becomes dress becomes body,’ proclaimed Rei Kawakubo, as she tried to sum up her radical perception of clothes and their function.Rei Kawakubo was interviewed by Susannah Frankel in her book, Fashion Visionaries (2001), London: V&A Publications, p. 154. Blurring the boundaries between dress and the body itself is typical for her; it has been central to her work for three decades. Ever since she made her debut in Paris her enigmatic and provocative collections have sent shock waves resonatin

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 12 of 12 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1