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Manolo Blahnik

Rio Ali

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

“Coiled Corset,” Shaun Leane for Alexander McQueen, Fall/Winter 1999

Kate Bethune

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The “Coiled Corset” is an example of radical body adornment made by jeweler Shaun Leane for fashion designer Alexander McQueen’s collection “The Overlook” (fall/winter 1999). Leane, who originally trained as a jeweler and goldsmith, first worked with McQueen in 1995, when he made silver watch chains for his “Highland Rape” collection (fall/winter 1995). His creative collaborations with McQueen soon propelled him to work with new materials and on a much larger scale to create elaborate body sculpt

Dai Rees

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Sarah Burton

Shonagh Marshall

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Alexander McQueen

Aimee Scott

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

McQueen, Alexander

Caroline Evans

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Isabella Blow, quoted in Sarajane Hoare, “God Save McQueen.” Harper’s Bazaar 30 (June 1996): 148.

Cyberpunk

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

“Cyberpunk” refers to a subgenre of postmodern science-fiction literature set in a dystopian near-future in which alienated countercultural antiheroes struggle to survive and reclaim power in a society dominated by technology and mega-corporations. The term originated from the title of a story written in 1982 by Bruce Bethke, who combined the term “cybernetics,” the science of replacing human functions with computerized ones, and “punk,” the nihilistic counterculture youth movement that originate

Steampunk

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the late 1980s, a literary subgenre emerged from science fiction and fantasy. Set in an alternate history of the nineteenth century, this subgenre is described as steampunk, a term coined in 1987 by author K. W. Jeter as a tongue-in-cheek analogy with cyberpunk. Both literary genres turn out cautionary tales of the perils of technology in the hands of the unscrupulous. Yet while cyberpunk looks with trepidation toward a dystopian future dominated by advanced technology, steampunk looks backwar

England

Naomi E.A. Tarrant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In 1800, the people of England dressed in the general West European clothing style that was worn by all fashionable people. Wealth determined what a person could afford to wear but not the style. There was no folk dress, so the general impression was that wealthy people wore the same styles as their workers, with only the quality showing the difference. The poor acquired garments from secondhand clothes dealers or as gifts from wealthier family members or friends, charities, and employers, as wel

When Is Creativity?

Ingrid Loschek

Source: When Clothes Become Fashion. Design and Innovation Systems 2009

Book chapter

In the mid 1990s, the psychologist Hans Jürgen Eysenck conjectured that creative achievements might be connected to particularly weak filtering of stimuli in the brain. This filter function in the brain helps a person to select the most relevant from a wealth of impressions, to distinguish between the unimportant and the important. If the filter is especially permeable, it may present a prerequisite to unusual associations—which Eysenck regards as a typical characteristic of creativity. On the ot

Two: Twenty-first-century Bodies

Bradley Quinn

Source: Techno Fashion 2002

Book chapter

Fashion, in the hands of Tristan Webber, may be the key to human evolution, because it holds the potential to change and shape the body of the future. Webber’s fascination with medical science fuses fashion with the biological theatre of the body as he uses principles of anatomy to reconfigure traditional cuts of fabrics and the placement of seams. Often referencing muscle groups and skeletal structures, Webber’s work examines the fashioned body with the forensic scrutiny of a medical autopsy.

Desire and Dread: Alexander McQueen and the Contemporary Femme Fatale

Caroline Evans

Source: Body Dressing. Dress, Body, Culture 2001

Book chapter

Alexander McQueen’s debut was a horror show . . . McQueen, who is 24 and from London’s East End, has a view that speaks of battered women, of violent lives, of grinding daily existences offset by wild, drug-enhanced nocturnal dives into clubs where the dress-code is semi-naked. (Hume 1993: 29).In fact this review was not of McQueen’s first but of his second collection, Nihilism, shown at the Bluebird Garage in London in October 1993. In her article Hume’s tone was shocked but not disapproving, an

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