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Today’s Buying Environment

Richard Clodfelter

Source: Retail Buying. From Basics to Fashion, 6th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Retailing consists of all the business activities involved in the selling of goods and services to the ultimate consumers. Retailing, however, does not always require a store. Catalog sales, vending machines, e-commerce, and mall kiosks all fit within the scope of retailing. No matter where retailing occurs, however, someone must perform the buying function. Buying is the business activity that involves selecting and purchasing products to satisfy the wants and needs of consumers. Buying involves

Eight: The Retro-Branding of American Heritage: Levi Strauss & Co.

Joseph H. Hancock

Source: Brand Story. Cases and Explorations in Fashion Branding, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

There is a common mistaken notion that Levi Strauss invented denim jeans while working in a gold mine in California. Actually, Levi Strauss was born of German Jewish immigrants in 1829. At the age of eighteen, he and his two sisters moved to the United States to join his two brothers, who had started a wholesale dry goods business in New York City called J. Strauss Brothers & Co. Later Levi Strauss moved to Louisville, Kentucky, to sell his brothers’ dry goods.

The Crinoline Period, 1850–1869

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Inspiration + Ingenuity

Melissa G. Carr and Lisa Hopkins Newell

Source: Guide To Fashion Entrepreneurship. The Plan, The Product, The Process, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A preemptive step for a fashion entrepreneur is to examine the framework of fashion and deconstruct the unpredictable nature of it. Although it vacillates on the axis of change and innovation, fashion can be comprehended and forecasted if intensely tracked and intimately followed from season to season. Fashion is immediate and competitive. Designers consistently manipulate fabrics, silhouettes, colors, textures, and other details to manifest their creative voice. Albeit individualized by brand, e

The Jeans Market and Advertising Between 1950 and 1985

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Levi’s 501: Back To The Future?

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

A Soundtrack for Consumerism: Music, Image and Myth

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

More Than Just A Number: A New Style of Advertising For The 1990s

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

From ‘Mothers’ to ‘Flat Eric’: Race, Gender, Age and Generation

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Planning and Control

Jeremy A. Rosenau and David L. Wilson

Source: Apparel Merchandising. The Line Starts Here, 3rd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The apparel industry is totally global. Almost all U.S. companies have established relations with locally owned factories in multiple developing countries that serve as subcontractors to produce an entire range of apparel products. These production relationships move from country to country, producer to producer, with increasing speed as apparel companies search for the best tax deals and the most efficient and lowest-cost labor forces. Nike first established its Asian production facilities in Ja

Chapter eight: Social Responsibility in the Retailing and Fashion Industry

Jay Diamond and Ellen Diamond

Source: The World of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Anders Dahlvig, Former CEO of Ikea

Fake Branded Clothing in Post-Socialist Romania

Magdalena Craciun

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Fake branded clothes, mostly of foreign origin, ranging from cheap versions to high-quality copies and seconds of originals with imperceptible defects, can easily be found in Romania in open-air markets or well-established shops, in shop windows or “under the counter,” and in many people’s wardrobes. Behind such goods, there are various interconnected phenomena—for example, an informal economy, opportunities, compromises, and constraints in post-Socialist consumption, as well as the increasing so

Conventional Work Dress and Casual Work Dress

Colleen Gau

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Clothing of men and women who lived and worked in the United States and Canada since the beginning of the nineteenth century through the start of the twenty-first century has presented a microcosm of societies’ changes. Agriculture was the primary means of livelihood at the outset and continues to play a role for a small portion of the population. Rag pickers, rug weavers, and quilters wore and reused fabrics; therefore, not many examples of work dress have survived. Early sewing machines of Germ

Brands and Labels

Jane M. Pavitt

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Jeans

Clare Sauro

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The first true “jeans” were created in 1873 by Jacob Davis, a Nevada tailor, who went in with Levi Strauss, a San Francisco merchant, for the patent. The pair received a patent for the addition of copper rivets at the pocket joinings of work pants to prevent tearing—a boon to the many California miners and laborers. The first jeans Levi-Strauss and Co. produced were available in brown cotton duck and blue denim and were known as waist overalls (the name jeans not adopted until the mid-1900s). In

Levi Strauss & Co.

Lauren D. Whitley

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Codes of Conduct and Monitoring

Marsha A. Dickson, Suzzana Loker and Molly Eckman

Source: Social Responsibility in the Global Apparel Industry, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Simon Zadek, Chief Executive of AccountAbility, proposes five steps in the path to greater social responsibility that reflect the often evolving responses of apparel brands and retailers to issues in factories producing their products (Table 6.1). These five steps, defensive, compliance, managerial, strategic, and civil, reflect the learning process that companies experience as their organizations develop an orientation toward social responsibility and philosophy, goals, values, and activities t

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