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Fake Branded Clothing in Post-Socialist Romania

Magdalena Craciun

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fake branded clothes, mostly of foreign origin, ranging from cheap versions to high-quality copies and seconds of originals with imperceptible defects, can easily be found in Romania in open-air markets or well-established shops, in shop windows or “under the counter,” and in many people’s wardrobes. Behind such goods, there are various interconnected phenomena—for example, an informal economy, opportunities, compromises, and constraints in post-Socialist consumption, as well as the increasing so

Conventional Work Dress and Casual Work Dress

Colleen Gau

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Clothing of men and women who lived and worked in the United States and Canada since the beginning of the nineteenth century through the start of the twenty-first century has presented a microcosm of societies’ changes. Agriculture was the primary means of livelihood at the outset and continues to play a role for a small portion of the population. Rag pickers, rug weavers, and quilters wore and reused fabrics; therefore, not many examples of work dress have survived. Early sewing machines of Germ

Brands and Labels

Jane M. Pavitt

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Jeans

Clare Sauro

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The first true “jeans” were created in 1873 by Jacob Davis, a Nevada tailor, who went in with Levi Strauss, a San Francisco merchant, for the patent. The pair received a patent for the addition of copper rivets at the pocket joinings of work pants to prevent tearing—a boon to the many California miners and laborers. The first jeans Levi-Strauss and Co. produced were available in brown cotton duck and blue denim and were known as waist overalls (the name jeans not adopted until the mid-1900s). In

Jeans

Phyllis G. Tortora

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The evolution of blue jeans from ordinary working dress into an international fashion classic began in California shortly after the start of the Gold Rush of 1849. Levi Strauss was a Bavarian immigrant seeking to expand the New York–based family-run dry goods business. Strauss arrived in San Francisco in 1853 and established a wholesale fabric supply house. One of his customers was Jacob Davis, a tailor who made blue denim work pants for miners and other laborers. Responding to complaints about p

Levi Strauss & Co.

Lauren D. Whitley

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

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