Results: Text (7) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 7 of 7 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Markus Lupfer

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Mulberry

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Tweed

Fiona Anderson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Tweed cloth originated in Scotland in the early nineteenth century. At that time, it was only made from woolen yarns in the twill weave. From the 1820s to the present, tweed has been characterized by a huge range of color and weave effects. The main account given for the origins of the name tweed is that it is based on a misreading of the Scottish word tweel or twill (which was the weave characteristic of Scottish woolens at that time) for tweed. By the 1840s, tweed was established as a term used

A State of Disunion: Britishness and British Fashion

L. Alison Goodrum

Source: The National Fabric. Fashion, Britishness, Globalization 2005

Book chapter

It is de rigeur for the British to be brooding about their national identity (Eyre 2004). The nation-state at large is said to face an uncertain future. Nowhere is this future more uncertain than in the case of the British nations. Weakened and eroded by the combined forces that we have seen mapped out in the preceding two chapters – of economic and cultural globalization – the fragmentation and uncertainty that accompany these processes have meant that the resulting disposition is one of ontolog

Rising Sun,Setting Trends: Exporting British Fashion

L. Alison Goodrum

Source: The National Fabric. Fashion, Britishness, Globalization 2005

Book chapter

Just ‘when does the “age of empire” begin and end?’ asks Driver (1993: 615), for ‘in what we might perhaps describe as the discourse of imperial campDriver offers us a further note of explanation on his use of the term ‘imperial camp’. ‘In Britain, at least,’ he writes, ‘fantasies about the exploits of imperial heroes continue, despite everything, to exert a powerful influence over the public sphere’ (Driver 1993: 615). Imperial camp, then, refers to the exaggerated – literally ‘the camping up’ o

Chic Versus Geek: Locating Nation, Locating Taste

L. Alison Goodrum

Source: The National Fabric. Fashion, Britishness, Globalization 2005

Book chapter

Deliberate imperfections in clothing – shredded fabrics, frayed edging, holes and ladders – signal that a trash aesthetic has gained momentumSee, for example, Winwood (1998a,b) or the collections of Margiela, Demeulemeester, Bet, Lang or van Noten. Note, however, that this latest stylistic tendency towards slashing and shredding is by no means an entirely novel concept. Recall the discussion (chapter 1) of punk’s aggressive ripping of everything from fishnet tights to slogan T-shirts during the l

Who Wears the Trousers? Fashion, Nation, Gender

L. Alison Goodrum

Source: The National Fabric. Fashion, Britishness, Globalization 2005

Book chapter

According to Franklin (1996: 17), British style is widely perceived as ‘a particularly blokey look’. In this view, the British male is dressed for action, reflecting a clear imperial legacy, in which his female alter ego is merely ‘lieutenant to the revved up [male] commanders’. These sartorial identities reflect – and indeed mobilize – an androcentric vision of the nation, where females have popularly been cast in supportive or decorative roles (recall the vicarious ostentation discussed in chap

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 7 of 7 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1