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Bella Freud

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Edie Sedgwick

Stephanie Kramer

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In the canon of fashion tastemakers, Edie Sedgwick remains both a legend and a mystery. In her short twenty-eight years, the Santa Barbara, California native was a socialite, heiress, artist, actress, model, New York scenester, and 1965’s anointed “Girl of the Year.” From her affiliation with Andy Warhol and the artistic community of the Factory to her collaboration with designer Betsey Johnson, to her stints as a model for Vogue, Sedgwick’s contribution to the world of fashion was undoubtedly a

Anna Wintour

Stephanie Kramer

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Regarded as one of the industry’s most powerful figures, Anna Wintour is not simply an arbiter of fashion, but also a style setter in her own right. As editor in chief of Vogue, Wintour establishes trends and anoints the latest talent, but as a fashion icon, her style is tailored to perfection, tried and true. Though Anna Wintour’s style legacy is still very much in the making, her position as a fashion icon has undoubtedly been established. Countless designers not only cite her as a muse, but th

André Leon Talley

Stephanie Kramer

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

At 6 ft. 6 in. (198 cm) tall and with a thirty-year tenure at Vogue, André Leon Talley is certainly one of fashion’s most imposing figures. An authority on fashion history, Talley’s expertise has been a crucial aspect of his work and has also deeply informed his own personal style. As designer Tom Ford observed, “He is one of the last great fashion editors who has an incredible sense of fashion history. He can see through everything you do to the original reference and predict what was on your in

Complice

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Grace Coddington

Katerina Pantelides

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This article explores Grace Coddington’s role as a style icon throughout her careers of model, stylist, and creative director. Coddington was born in 1941 in Anglesey, Wales, and as a teenager, emulated Audrey Hepburn. In 1959 she moved to London to become a model and worked with youthful, avant-garde designers and photographers in the 1960s. Coddington’s signature style, her red mane and eclectic combination of vintage and modern pieces, emerged in the 1970s when she was a fashion editor at Brit

Anna Piaggi

Victoria Rose Pass

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

From the 1970s until her death in 2012, Anna Piaggi was one of the most recognizable fashion editors in the world. With her shock of bright blue hair, often topped with a doll’s hat worn at a rakish angle, and her penchant for exaggerated—almost clown-like—makeup, Piaggi delighted in dressing with irreverence. She freely combined vintage and contemporary fashion as well as high and low. Born in Milan in 1931, Piaggi began freelancing for Vogue in the 1970s, and in 1988 was hired as a creative con

Modeling History: How Models Have Changed Between the 1970s and 2000

Julia Rea

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The role and significance of the fashion model has been subject to a series of profound changes since the professionalization of the occupation in the late nineteenth century. These variations have been catalyzed by a wide range of social, cultural, and creative influences, from shifting trends in photography and fashion and changing ideals of beauty and femininity to the advent of technology, the Internet, and social media. When Vogue launched in the United States in 1892, the magazine’s fashion

Valentino, Spring/Summer 1987

Rosily Roberts

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Valentino’s 1987 spring/summer collection is both feminine and elegant. He uses a number of different luxurious materials and precise tailoring to create clothes with a sense of timelessness. Looking at the critical reception of this collection in publications such as Vogue, this essay will examine the relevance of the collection as well as the extent to which it departed from his previous style.

Shifting Trends Postwar: 1950s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

The exuberance at the end of the war was expressed by the Paris fashion designer Christian Dior. His New Look in the Spring–Summer 1947 collection is described as a sea change in fashion and had a marked impact on women’s postwar styles (see Figure 138). Anticipating freedom from the fabric restrictions imposed by rationing during the war, Dior emphasized a large bust, small waist, below-mid-calf-length full skirt, and a full peplum emphasizing the hips. The style became immensely popular. Howeve

New Challenges: 1960s–1980s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

A common misconception is that by the 1960s women stopped sewing and making their own clothes due to the mass of inexpensive, readily available ready-to-wear options. However, the 1960s were actually a boom period. The Barron’s article “Profitable Patterns” (1958) reported that pattern companies were generally profitable, with the exception of Vogue. The parent company, Condé Nast, was publishing several magazines and running the pattern division, which operated at a loss. However, the losses “ar

Reinvention and Renaissance: 1980s–2010

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

The 1980s witnessed a burst of computer technological. The technology was incorporated in pattern companies’ business practices in manufacturing and marketing procedures. By 1991, when restricted commercial use of the Internet was lifted, pattern companies embraced it to rapidly market their designs. Companies began to use computer applications to trim costs, to improve inventory control, and to boost productivity. For example, Simplicity used an application to streamline procedures for processi

Shifts and Balances: 1900–1920s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

A dynamic new figure entered the pattern enterprise in the first decade of the new century. Condé Nast was adept at promotion and was attracted to the pattern industry. He organized the Home Pattern Company and distributed dress patterns in an arrangement with Ladies’ Home Journal in 1905 (Seebohm 1982: 32). The Ladies’ Home Journal was an influential women’s periodical with a circulation of 1,000,000 (Mott 1938: vol. 4, 545). Nast had remarkable marketing skills and successfully promoted pattern

Surviving the Depression: 1930s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

Pattern producers repudiate rumors that they enjoyed a boom during the Depression. Like most other businesses, theirs suffers when people are hard up; it recovers when people start spending again. Patterns hit bottom in 1932. Improvement began in the Fall of 1933, but not soon enough to make an increase for the year. Estimates place 1934 ahead of 1933 by about 10%.

The War Years: 1940s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

With the onset of the Second World War in Europe, prosperity began returning to the U.S. and Canadian economies. Both North and South America became major suppliers to Europe, which meant expanded production and therefore more jobs and more money for the consumer to spend. Pattern sales for all the existing companies increased noticeably, except for Butterick, which was still struggling from the problems that began in the late 1920s and were exacerbated by the bankruptcy reorganization in 1935. T

Being Chic and Being British

Geraldine Howell

Source: Wartime Fashion. From Haute Couture to Homemade, 1939–1945 2012

Book chapter

The Healthy Body and the Politics of Fitness

Geraldine Howell

Source: Wartime Fashion. From Haute Couture to Homemade, 1939–1945 2012

Book chapter

Fashions for a Phoney War

Geraldine Howell

Source: Wartime Fashion. From Haute Couture to Homemade, 1939–1945 2012

Book chapter

North American Influences on West European Dress

Rebecca Arnold

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

North America’s effect on West European fashion is often viewed only in relation to Hollywood and celebrity. However, its influence has been far more diverse, from technological inventions to leisure wear and the professionalization of the industry.

Fashion Photography

Patrik Aspers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The production system behind fashion photography is a collaboration among many sectors in the fashion industry. A photographer takes fashion pictures, usually of models wearing clothes. Garment firms produce the clothes, which are intended to be worn by consumers. Present at the set—that is, the place where the pictures are taken—are often a makeup artist, a hairstylist, and a fashion stylist, all of whom may have assistants. The pictures will be processed and edited on a computer, and they will

Fashion Journalism

Kate Nelson Best

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion journalism embraces all kinds of media commentary, but primarily newspaper and magazine articles, about the fashion industry, those who populate the fashion world, and fashion itself. As such, it has commercial, ideological, and symbolic functions that have remained unchanged since the mid-1800s.

Vogue

Laird Borrelli

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual Media and Dress

Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Gibson Church

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual media have played an enormous role in the development of fashion in West Europe. Fashion imagery emerged within print journalism, more specifically women’s magazines, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The development of popular cinema in the first half of the twentieth century had a momentous impact on the global fashion industry, especially in the star system, the “tie-in,” and the involvement of both couturiers and ready-to-wear designers in film. From the radical changes of th

The Pattern Industry

Carol Anne Dickson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The pattern industry in the United States and Canada had as its antecedents a number of earlier attempts to simplify the making of garments. The first patterns, made by cloistered monks, consisted of only two pieces. In the thirteenth century, French master tailor Charles Daillac began making his patterns out of thin pieces of wood. In the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries, fashion journals began to appear, illustrating and describing the increasingly complex fashions of the times. In

Vreeland, Diana

Michelle Tolini Finamore

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Vreelands moved back to New York in 1935. Diana began her first job in fashion editorial work at Harper’s Bazaar in 1937. She was promoted to the position of fashion editor in 1939, working under editor-in-chief Carmel Snow, and remained at the magazine until 1962. Vreeland first came to the readership’s attention with her 1936 column entitled “Why Don’t You?” The feature encapsulated her personal belief in the ability of fashion to transform women by offering such extravagant and fantastic s

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