Results: Text (2) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 2 of 2 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Homeworking and the Sewing Machine in the British Clothing Industry 1850–1905

Andrew Godley

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

A series of patents granted in the United States in the late 1840s and early 1850s formed the key components of the early sewing machine. The patent owners combined to form a patent-pool from 1856 to 1877, which determined the early structure of the sewing machine manufacturing industry. (Hounshell 1984: 67;Davies 1976: 5–12)The following section is drawn from Godley (1996). The principal manufacturers – Wheeler and Wilson, Willcox and Gibbs, Grover and Baker, and Singer – quickly established the

A Beautiful Ornament in the Parlour or Boudoir: The Domestication of the Sewing Machine

Nicholas Oddy

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

Immense numbers of the sewing machines are disposed of every week to tailors, clothiers, hosiers, sail-makers etc., and some to private families. The price, £30, will, of course, for the present, place it out of the reach of most of the latter; but that it will one day be an essential article of furniture in every well regulated household we have no doubt.

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 2 of 2 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1