Results: Text (21) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 21 of 21 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Malawi

Barbara W. Blackmun

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Landlocked Malawi is situated in southeast Africa. It has a large lake, a varied topography and climate, and a diverse population. Dress traditions reflect the country’s checkered history, involving foreign influence through migration, trade, and invasion. Nguni warriors from Natal conquered lakeside farming communities in the 1850s, and Arab and Yao slave traders later devastated the land, which became a British protectorate in 1890. Previously, the Maravi and Yao peoples were renowned ironworke

Performance Dress in China and Taiwan

Alexandra B. Bonds, Dongshin Chang and Elizabeth Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Over three hundred forms of indigenous theater entertainment incorporating song and music have evolved in China, with different forms of music-dramas being performed in specific regions throughout the country. Among these forms, Kunqu (songs of Kunshan) took shape in the Lower Yangtze region of China in the mid-sixteenth century, attained national popularity in the following two centuries, and is still thriving in the early twenty-first century. Jingju (capital drama), commonly known in the West

Republic of Congo and Democratic Republic of Congo

Elisabeth L. Cameron

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Before France and Belgium divided the area in the late nineteenth century, the Republic of Congo (capital Brazzaville) and the Democratic Republic of Congo (capital Kinshasa) were a continuous area that shared cultural traits, including fashion and body art. When the Portuguese arrived at the mouth of the Congo River in the late fifteenth century, they were amazed by the high quality of the raffia cloths produced in the Congo area. The Portuguese introduced European cloth and fashions, and two of

Manchu National Minority

Pamela Kyle Crossley

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Manchus are descended from the group of Arctic peoples in northeastern Asia that included the ancestors of the modern Ewenki, Oroqens, Hezhen, and closely related peoples of China and Russia. They were speakers of Tungusic languages (the extreme eastern branch of the hypothesized Altaic language family) and for most of their history were hunting and gathering peoples. In the 2003 census, Manchus numbered 6.9 million, or about 5 percent of the total population of China. Nearly all Manchus live

Codpiece

Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Cambodia

Gillian Green

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the four centuries between the fall of Angkor to the Siamese in the mid-fifteenth century c.e. and the arrival of French officials in the mid-nineteenth century, there is very little direct information about Khmer dress. It can be presumed, however, that owing to Siamese political dominance, the dress of the upper echelons of society would have conformed to that of the Siamese court during the Ayutthaya period (1351–1767 c.e.) and its successor, the Ratanakosin period (from 1782 on). Siamese s

Guinea-Bissau

Walter Hawthorne and Clara Carvalho

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Guinea Bissau, northwest of Guinea and south of Senegal, is located on the Atlantic Coast. The region has long been home to dozens of relatively small-scale, politically decentralized societies, three of the largest of which are the Bijago, Manjaco, and Balanta. The Guinea Bissau region has witnessed the comings and goings of foreigners for many centuries, culminating in Portuguese colonization in the early twentieth century. The broad economic, political, and social changes that were forced upon

Early Evidence of Fashion in West Europe

Sarah-Grace Heller

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

For the Roman period, relatively rich quantities of textual and visual sources (notably sculpture and mosaics) survive; actual items of apparel are extremely rare, as is the case for most areas up through the Middle Ages. Rome had urban populations, skilled artisans, trading networks, and an active culture of social criticism and satire that often used the lexicon of adornment to evaluate merit, reputation, and the erotic. Roman status was defined visually. More problematic for fashion is the rat

Art and Dress

Peter McNeil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Academic art and popular dress emerge from different structural and intellectual systems. Nonetheless, fashion in the early twenty-first century often appears to be like art and art to be like fashion. Artists are viewed as the ideal collaborators with fashion designers and the fashion industry, injecting the type of cultural capital they embody into products that have become synonymous with innovation and novelty. Artists throughout the twentieth century intervened in fashion culture, their anti

Estonia: Urban Dress

Reet Piiri

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the thirteenth century, Estonia was divided among German nobility, but no German peasants moved there, so a clear ethnic divide developed along class lines. Clothing was produced in guilds, and also at home, especially (but not only) in poorer households. The fifteenth century marked the advent of the décolleté, hoop skirt, flared sleeves, and gold and silver embroidery. Although the Reformation reached Estonia in 1523, the courtly clothing fashions of Catholic Spain exerted an influence. The

Dress and Art: Western

Sandra L. Rosenbaum

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Images of people wearing clothing create an obvious connection between dress and art. Because relatively few examples of historic garments survive, these images document the history of dress. Historically, those sitting for portraits chose their dress to project a specific image; the artist was responsible for conveying messages encoded in dress, meticulously reproducing them. Ann Rosalind Jones and Peter Stallybrass have commented that Renaissance clothes were perceived as material forms of pers

Early Noble Dress in Russia

Oksana Sekatcheva

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Early Russian dress in the period from the fourteenth to the seventeenth century is widely regarded as a dress of national identity and is generally termed “historic Russian costume.” Its development was completed by the middle of the sixteenth century, and it existed almost unchanged until the end of the seventeenth century, when it was officially ousted in favor of European dress during Peter the Great’s reforms.

Music and Dress

Else Skjold

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Music and dress have played a significant role in the civilization process in West Europe. Both being aesthetic fields meant to be performed and put into play by human gesture, they have proved to be efficient tools for cultivating the movements, postures, and gestures of the body. The material, cut, and shape of dress have manipulated the body to move in certain ways, as have rhythms and expressions in music. Significant for West Europe has been a duality between spirit and body, causing a divis

Society and Festivals

Jacob Burckhardt

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

Gendered Space in Renaissance Florence: Theorizing Public and Private in the “Rag Trade”

Carole Collier Frick

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

The field of Renaissance studies is one of the oldest areas of historical inquiry, dating from the fifteenth century itself, which may partially explain its cultural impact on Western civilization ever since.An earlier version of this article was delivered at the CHODA Conference, Courtauld Institute, London, in July 2004. I am grateful for the very helpful contributions of Sophie White, and also the two anonymous readers for the journal of Fashion Theory for their insights and suggestions to thi

Venice and the Dress of Foreigners

Stella Mary Newton

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

The Upward Training of the Body from the Age of Chivalry to Courtly Civility

Georges Vigarello

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

From the Middle Ages on, every failure of physical uprightness has been attributed to two main categories: the stigma of deformity, sanctioned by the attention given to strength and aesthetic qualities, and the lack of the proper deportment prescribed mainly by socialized ethics. In both cases, however, medieval comments were unpolished and hasty, even weak compared with those which would be made in the sixteenth century. The strongest and most valiant knight was lost if disabled – “he falls to t

The Florentine ‘Rigattieri’: Second Hand Clothing Dealers and the Circulation of Goods in the Renaissance

Carole Collier Frick

Source: Old Clothes, New Looks. Second Hand Fashion 2005

Book chapter

In the economy of Renaissance Florence, the textile and garment industry dominated the urban marketplace for consumer goods. In addition to the 909 household heads Franceschi found who listed some aspect of the woolen cloth business as their occupation at the turn of the fifteenth century, Herlihy and Klapisch-Zuber counted 866 clothiers in 1427 that identified themselves by some aspect of the clothing trade within the city.For the wool-workers see (Franceschi, 1993: tab. 20: 143). For other clot

Visualizing Difference: The Rhetoric of Clothing in Colonial Spanish America

Mariselle Meléndez

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Walter Mignolo observes that the lack of writing along with the lack of clothing and cannibalism constituted three crucial elements often used in the construction of Amerindian images: “Not having it yet or having it in excess were two cognitive moves used by Europeans in constructing the identity of the self-same by constructing at the same time, the image of the other” (Mignolo 1992: 312). Written as well as visual texts usually contrasted the nakedness of the indigenous people with the presenc

Korean Wedding Dress from the Chosun Dynasty (1392–1910) to the Present

Na Young Hong

Source: Wedding Dress Across Cultures 2003

Book chapter

During the Chosun dynasty, matchmakers arranged marriages. When both families agreed, a letter which contained the year, month, date, and hour of a prospective groom’s birth was sent to the bride’s family. The acceptance of the letter by the bride’s family officially sealed the engagement and the groom and the bride became betrothed without knowing each other. The bride’s parents used the letter to consult horoscopes in order to predict the harmony between the couple and, if auspicious, set a wed

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 21 of 21 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1