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Mannequins and Alternatives

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

There are some exciting new trends taking place in the mannequin industry. Manufacturers are consulting with visual merchandisers about their needs, and their response has influenced the design and customization of mannequins. Some companies are offering mannequins with arms that detach magnetically instead of using the traditional interlocking hardware.

Accessories

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Footwear has always had a place in history and literature. From childhood, we read about gallant heroes in seven-league boots, princesses in glass slippers, Mercury with winged feet, and, of course, the magic ruby slippers that took Dorothy from the Land of Oz back home to Kansas.

“All of Me”: Billie Holiday

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Music is our witness, and our ally. The beat is the confession which recognises changes and conquers time. Then, history becomes a garment we can wear and share, and not a cloak in which to hide; and time becomes a friend.

Fashion and Feminism

Henriette Dahan-Kalev and Shoshana-Rose Marzel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

civil rightsgenderDuring the French Revolution, dress became an important issue: one of the ways in which revolutionaries’ values were to be obtained and symbolized was through the adoption of class-less styles of clothing, which expressed the ideals of Fraternity, Liberty, and Equality.

Accessories

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A hat is the accessory worn on top of the head. A hat may fit the head, be pulled down over the eyes, or almost look as if it were just sitting on the top.

Accessories

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The manufacturers of accessories must constantly forecast the changes in cycles of fashion so that their accessories are perfect for new fashions. This includes not only the changes in silhouette but also fabrications and color. The marketing of accessories gained an enormous boost with the entrance of well-known designers’ names into the business. Today, the fame of the accessories designer is as important as the fame of the clothing designer; in many cases, it is the same famous name.

Talitha Getty

Osman Ahmed

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Talitha Dina Pol (1940–1971) was born in Bali. After moving to London in 1945, following a traumatic period spent with her birth mother in a Japanese POW camp, Talitha studied at Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts with hopes of becoming an actress. Young, beautiful, and exotic, she was courted and celebrated by London society, becoming the second wife of John Paul Getty Jnr., the son of oil tycoon Paul Getty, in 1966. She wore an all-white, mink-trimmed, hooded minidress that echoed the height of Swi

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Carmen Miranda

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Carmen Miranda was born in Portugal but grew up in Rio de Janeiro and considered herself a Brazilian. Her love of singing led to a career as a musical star in Brazil, going on conquer the US in 1939. Her cheery, colorful persona wiggled through a succession of Hollywood movies in extraordinary costumes that celebrated the color and passion of Brazil and its music, accented with Carmen’s trademark headpieces. Her influence on fashion in her lifetime was strong, with ranges of clothing, jewelry, sh

Islamic Style

Magdalena Crăciun

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Fashion designers have found inspiration in past and present sartorial repertoires. Islamically appropriate forms of covered dress have aesthetically been drawn upon as well. Consequently, headscarves, face veils and head-to-toe outerwear have occasionally appeared on the catwalk. Fashion commentators have pointed out that such creations and assemblages referenced ethic, traditional, historical, exotic or oriental dress, and only rarely labelled their source of inspiration as Islamic style. The n

The Art of Creating Dress

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Dai Rees

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Chanel Haute Couture, Karl Lagerfeld, Spring/Summer 1987

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Chanel’s spring/summer 1987 haute couture collection was shown in the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where a student demonstration outside the venue required there to be tight security. On the stage, a fake statue of the Winged Victory was clothed in Chanel and holding a quilted bag. Critics derided the bustle-inspired “parabola” line and peplum hems that “obscured the real fashion originality” and “made the models look a bit like roosters.” Despite the criticism, the empire

Hervé Léger

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Philip Treacy

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Phillip Treacy, Spring/Summer 1999–2000

Victoria Rose Pass

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Milliner Phillip Treacy’s show for London’s spring/summer fashion week on 22 February 1999 played with anthropomorphic shapes that obscured the head and face. While a few designs had their basis in top hats, or fedoras, many more were based on entirely novel forms, from dinner plates to Alexander Calder mobiles. Models such as Grace Jones, Naomi Campbell, and Alek Wek walked with glittering makeup painted over one half of their face, obscuring recognizable features when the lights of the catwalk

Etruria and Rome, c. 800 BCE–400 CE

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

The Late Middle Ages, c. 1300–1500

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

The Seventeenth Century, c. 1600–1700

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

The Romantic Period, 1820–1850

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

The Ancient Middle East c. 3500 – 600 BCE

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

One of the most outstanding aspects of Egyptian civilization is the relative slowness with which changes occurred. It is not that there were no significant changes in the 3,000 years during which this civilization existed, but they took place so gradually that they seemed almost imperceptible, even over several hundred years. For almost 3,000 years, Egyptian civilization was scarcely affected by foreign cultural and political influences. According to historian Fairservis (1962), “Between the Egy

Crete and Greece c. 2900 – 100 BCE

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

On the narrow island of Crete in the eastern Mediterranean, another civilization flourished over much the same period of time as that of the Egyptians and Mesopotamians. Named for their legendary king, Minos, the Minoan people enjoyed peace and prosperity from c. 2900 to 1450 BCE and developed an elegant culture (Figure 3.1).

Etruria and Rome c. 800 BCE – 400 CE

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Prehistoric human occupants of the Italian peninsula migrated to Italy from many different places: Africa, Sicily, Spain, France, the Danube Valley, and Switzerland. They left no written records and are known only through archeological remains. These remains tell us they were pastoral people who tilled the soil, wove clothing, and made pottery and bronze implements. Among the pre-Roman peoples who migrated into Italy, none left a deeper impression than the Etruscans.

The Early Middle Ages c. 330 – 1500

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In 330, Roman Emperor Constantine moved his capital from Rome to Byzantium, a Greek port city. The city, renamed Constantinople, became the capital of the Byzantine Empire. Located at the entrance of the Black Sea, the city and its surrounding territories commanded both land and sea trade routes between the west and central Asia, Russia, and east Asia. At the same time, the city was protected by the rugged Balkan Mountains from the invading barbarians who overran Rome and the Italian peninsula.

The Late Middle Ages c. 1300 – 1500

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As medieval monarchs successfully centralized their governments, the power of nobles and knights declined. Feudalism began to wane before the 14th century, because kings found new sources of revenue by taxing cities and towns. The income allowed them to hire knights who fought as long as they were paid. Monarchs learned that a paid army was more dependable than feudal nobles.

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