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The Basic Bodice

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Shoulder/waistline dart bodiceFitted waist seam bodiceShoulder/waist dart bodiceDart bodiceBodice sloper, basic;When a manufacturer develops a new clothing line, one of the first requirements is a set of foundation patterns (blocks or slopers). These foundation patterns should match the proportion, size, and fit of the target customer. They also provide the designer and manufacturer with a consistent fit, silhouette, ease allowance, armhole size, waistline measurement, and desired length.

The Basic Fitted Skirt

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A basic fitted two-dart straight skirt is a fitted skirt with side seams parallel to the center of the skirt. The center front and center back are on perfect grain and the hip-level lines are on perfect crossgrain, allowing the area below the hip line to hang straight up and down. This skirt has a fitted waist area in which the excess fabric above the hip line is controlled by waistline darts. This skirt is considered the most important of all skirt drapes because of its versatility in creating m

Torso/Blouse Sloper and Basic Shift Silhouettes

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Torso/blouse sloperThe torso/blouse sloper and basic shift silhouettes have a bust-fitting dart and no waistline seam. The waist area can be slightly fitted with one or two fisheye darts, belted, or drawn in with elastic. The side seams hang slightly away from the body and are parallel to center front. By using the torso/blouse sloper, it can be lengthened to make a shift design. Many styles of pockets, plackets, yokes, necklines, collars, and/or sleeves can be used to create the individual style

Bodice and Blouse Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesBodice and blouse designsThe bodice and blouse designs in this group are kept simple and natural while the fabric is draped with the correct amount of ease and proportion. Projects explore how to release and manipulate the fabric into a design. Each design defines the style and silhouette over the bust, hip, and waist by emphasizing the use of folds, darts, pleats, fullness, empire seams, and halters, and at the same time, not overworking the fabric.

Princess Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesPrincess designsvariations onPrincess designsA princess design has vertical seams that divide the bodice into separate panels. When these seams are sewn together, they take on the same shape as the bodice or blouse, but with vertical seams. Typically, a princess bodice has a close-fitting waist with an unbroken styleline that usually extends from the shoulder or armhole to the waistline. This style almost always crosses over the midpoint of the bustline (apex) a

Dartless Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dartless designsblouse and shirt silhouettesBodice and blouse designsdartless blouseThe silhouettes within this chapter offer timeless, simple silhouettes that are used in designing blouses, vests, or dresses that do not require the use of a bust-fitting dart. These silhouette shapes can be made short or extended to the length desired, depending upon the design. Various styles may use details such as numerous neckline shapes, collars, yokes, stylelines, tucks, added fullness, and different sleeve

Kimono and Raglan Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The following sleeve variations are used within the different armhole openings for garment designs—the raglan sleeve and the Kimono sleevekimono sleeve. The kimono sleeve is developed in conjunction with the dartless shirt, whereas the raglan sleeve is developed in conjunction with the torso/blouse. These sleeves are used to create a variety of sleeve designs for dresses, blouses, and shirts.

Skirt Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesSkirt designsA skirt is a separate item of clothing starting above, below, or at the natural waistline. Skirt designs vary from basic tailor-made to extreme. The designer may change a skirt style by draping the design close to the body, or by draping in various fullness, gathers, flares, pleats, gores, or godets. The shape, the sweep of the skirt (the amount of width at the hemline), and the appearance at the hem length will depend upon the design, the customer,

Pants

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesPantsbasic two-dart draftTwo-dart pantsPantsAs requested by many professors, the following pages are directions for drafting the most commonly used pant in lieu of draping. This draft is the industry standard and is the easiest method to create correctly fitting pants and use as a guide in creating various designs and pant drapes. The basic pants for woven fabrics are the basic two-dart pant and the jeans pant. From these basics, many other designs can be create

Knit Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesKnit designsThere is a free-spirit attitude in knitwear, which exhibits an effortless fusion of relaxed casual sportswear with modern sophistication. Fashioning knits allows the designer to create looks that offer super-feminine, whimsical design, an element of nostalgia, or a buoyant sporty look.

Jacket Silhouettes and Collar/Lapel Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Lapel designs, jacketsCollar and neckline designsThe jacket is an item of clothing that is worn over other clothing. The focus for jackets is on alternating lengths and volumes, combining with comfortable lines and collars. Some are made in double-breasted or single-breasted manner, while others have no closing and some are closed with a zipper or buttons.

Cowl Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Cowl designsA cowl features deliciously draped necklines or underarm areas that have falling, soft folds. Cowls are draped on the bias, usually in lighter, finer fabrics to enhance a soft, harmonious look. A Bodice and blouse designscowl blousecowl blouse or dress design can be draped subtly or to add imaginative zing to an otherwise low-key garment. When draping a cowl design, the drape should be done in the same fabric weight as the finished design.

Casual Dress Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesCasual dress designsDresses come in many shapes and lengths with a variety of seams, necklines, sleeves, and collars. They are worn for work or play, for day or night, for any occasion, and all year round.

Formal Dress Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Formal dress designsobjectives inFormal dress designsBustier designsEvening dresses are gorgeous in fluid dress-weight fabrics that are beautifully draped and seductive with their perpetual movement. Arrangements of flounces, sunray pleats, layered ruches, bias cuts, and gathers make dresses dance. Designers should be able to incorporate many draping techniques from this chapter for a special evening look for many clients.

Tweed, Femininity, and Fashion, 1851–1918

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Prior to the early 1850s, Scottish woolen manufacturers predominantly catered to the ladies’ trade through the weaving of shawls and fine, merino dress fabrics that were known as ““cloakings”cloakings,” as noted in Chapter 3. In 1863, Locke, JamesJames Locke described recent changes in the Scottish woolen industryScottish woolen industry, by stating: The Scotch tweed trade then may be divided into three distinct sections- viz. tweeds, shawlsshawls, and cloakings. The last of these came to their c

Suits You: Men and Tweed, 1919–1952

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Following the First World War, as Jenkins, DavidJenkins clarifies, there was an immediate boom in the wool textiles trade, which for a brief period generated high profits and labor demand.DavidJenkins, “Wool Textiles in the Twentieth Century,” in DavidJenkins, The Cambridge History of Western Textiles, II (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), p. 995. In the company history of Crombie, J. & J. (company)J. & J. Crombie of Aberdeen these developments are described as follows: there was a tr

Sportswear Chic: Tweed in Womenswear, 1919–1952

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Detailed statistics about the proportion of British tweeds, which were consumed by women, or made specifically for the female market between 1919 and 1952 are not available. However, estimates from key Scottish woolen industry bodies and a government study give a useful indication about the picture within Scotland up to 1946. The visit of the Scottish Woollen Trade Mark Association (SWTA)Scottish Woollen Trade Mark Association to the USA and Canada toward the end of 1921 prompted an article in Ga

Fashion Lexicon: Terms, Icons, History, and Inspiration

Shannon Burns-Tran and Jenny B. Davis

Source: Style Wise. A Practical Guide to Becoming a Fashion Stylist, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fashioncommunication inIn this chapter you will learn:

Flammability testing and issues specific to children’s products

Deanna Clark-Esposito

Source: A Practical Guide to Fashion Law and Compliance, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The law as a means to prevent flammable wearing apparel dates back to 1953 when the Flammable Fabrics ActFlammable Fabrics Act (FFA) was enacted. This law, together with its rules and regulations, provides the framework within which this prevention effort continues today and is commonly referred to as the Flammability Standard, theFlammability Standard.See, Standard for the Flammability of Textiles (16 CFR Part 1610). Its purpose is twofold. The first is to prevent individuals from wearing clothi

Introduction

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Think Fashion or Tradition?

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Kimono lovers may question the necessity for this chapter at all. Why does it matter if kimono is regarded as fashion or tradition anyway? It matters because the WestWest in general, and FranceFrance in particular, have claimed the fashioncenter ofcenter of fashion as their own and still retain a hegemonyhegemony in fashion discourse. Even at a fashion technology conference at the most prestigious fashion fashionschoolschool in TokyoTokyo in 2014, I heard two Japanese professors referring to Pari

Tracing Trends in Heian and Edo

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It is probably impossible to pinpoint a moment or location at which fashion started. Chapter 1 outlined five defining aspects of fashion from a body of fashion fashiontheorytheory, and now we return to the story of kimono, in the light of those five aspects. References to clothing used in functional ways or to uphold custom(s)customs, traditions, or the status quo are to be expected, so here the search is for deviations from such norms. The search is for any shreds of evidence of clothing used in

Mode Becomes Modern: Meiji to Twenty-First Century

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Kon’s work showed that at the beginning of the 1950s, half of the women walking in GinzaGinza were wearing western clothing, which was on the increase as kimono wearing declined. cultureJapaneseJapanese women did not suddenly change from kimono to western dressdress, but even those who stayed in kimono brought up their childrenchildren wearing western clothes. Thus kimono began to vanish from everyday life, and a postwar generation grew up without it. So the natural order of a mother teaching her

In Press and Picture: Kimono Discourse

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

This chapter examines kimono in printed texts, both writtenwritten and visual. This is important because printed text is largely responsible for the creation of trends and their diffusion among groups of consumers; thus it plays a key role in the fashion cycle. As Chapters 1–3 show, the written word is a key source for finding out about kimono in the past, as even when fabric or garments remain, these alone cannot enlighten us about their usage. Novels, trading tradingdocumentsdocuments, and patt

Making and Marketing

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The market research data in the “Kimono industryIndustry White Paper” revealed the strong downward trend in kimono sales after the economic bubble in the mid-1980s, see Chapter 3, Chart 3.1. The reasons were not only the increasingly poor state of the economy, but, as explained in that chapter, the unwieldy distribution system associated with a crafts-based industry and also the perceptions about kimono being expensive and difficult to wear that had been created by the industry itself. The effect

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