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Capes and Cloaks

Emma Davenport

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

A cape or cloak is a layer of fabric that wraps around the body for warmth and protection and is with or without sleeves. While men have historically worn both as a military garment, they became popular as womenswear in the late 1800s. By the early 1900s, they had fallen out of fashion, replaced by a wider range of coat styles. On the catwalk, both are associated with adventure and intrigue, making them more of a romantic accessory than a daily necessity. While designers like Yves Saint Laurent a

Harriet Selling

Tory Turk

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Aboriginal Skin Cloaks

Fabri Blacklock

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In customary societies Aboriginal people were minimally clothed until contact with Europeans began to alter their habits. One exception was the skin cloaks widely worn by men and women throughout temperate zones of southeastern and western Australia. Cloaks were their main article of dress, important as rugs for warmth, but also for ceremonial use, trade, and as burial shrouds. Indigenous peoples made a variety of cloaks from different types of skin: possums, kangaroos, wallabies, and other fur-b

Ireland

Síle de Cléir

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The situation regarding the various types of dress in Ireland in the period between the beginning of the nineteenth and the end of the twentieth centuries is a complex one. It is useful, perhaps, in this context to see dress in Ireland at this time as a continuum: folk dress at one end, characterized by locally produced fabrics and traditional aesthetics and deeply embedded in a local social and cultural context; and fashionable dress at the other, with a wider choice of materials and styles conn

Early History of Dress and Fashion in Italy and the Iberian Peninsula

Carmen Alfaro Giner and Maria Giuseppina Muzzarelli

Translated by Ana Alacovska

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Rock engravings in Valcamonica, Italy, indicate the use of looms and thus weaving in the second millennium b.c.e. Tunics were worn by both men and women during pre-Roman times in the Iberian Peninsula.Italian regions colonized by Greece in the eighth century b.c.e. were influenced by Hellenic fashion. The Roman royal period lasted from 753 to 509 b.c.e., followed by the republic and the empire. Clothing during the first two periods was largely austere, although wealth and refinement characterized

Liturgical Robes in New Zealand

Sandra Heffernan

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Liturgical dress worn by members of the Roman Catholic Church played an important part in daily life and religious observances, and rituals from birth to death, in colonial New Zealand. In 1838 Marist Catholic missionaries landed in the north of New Zealand, where most of the twelve Catholic mission stations were established. At this time seventy thousand Māoris were dispersed throughout the country, and there was a small European settlement of approximately twenty thousand, mostly in the ports a

Dress of Shiites and Mystics

Ashgar Seyed-Gohrab

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Shiites form the second-largest community of Muslims, who believe that the Prophet Mohammad’s cousin and son-in-law Ali ibn Abu Talib was his rightful successor. The Shiites do not accept the leadership of the first three caliphs, Abu Bakr, Omar, and Othman, emphasizing that they usurped Ali’s right. Islamic mystics and the Shiite clerics wear certain types of dress that distinguish them from other classes in Islamic societies. The dress of a Shiite cleric in contemporary Iran comprises a tur

Spain

Silvia Ventosa

Translated by Lucy Lawton

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The influence of Spanish dress on European fashions is concentrated in two periods: the period of court life of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries with the moda a la española (Spanish-style fashion), and that of the majos, members of the Madrid artistic scene at the end of the eighteenth century and during the nineteenth century. The stereotypical image of the Spanish was fixed around 1800, an image that emanated from the south, from Andalusia, and this stereotype still survives in the early

Introduction to Māori Dress

Patricia Te Arapo Wallace

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

When early Eastern Polynesian navigators explored Te Moana-Nui ā-Kiwa (“The Great Sea of Kiwa,” or the Pacific Ocean), they discovered the world’s largest oceanic archipelago, Aotearoa—New Zealand. The temperate climate of this geographically isolated land had produced a restricted range of flora and fauna. Away from their tropical homelands, the voyaging ancestors of the Māori people discovered that survival in the colder climate required significantly warmer clothing. They experimented with new

Religion and Dress

Nigel Yates, Dan Cohn-Sherbok and Dawoud El-Alami

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The wearing of special dress by all or some members of particular religions is commonplace throughout the world. In most cases, a distinction is made between the special dress worn by those officiating at religious services and that worn by those attending the services. In West Europe, the wearing of special dress within the different Christian churches—Eastern Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Protestant—has been largely confined to the clergy or to members of religious orders of monks and nuns, alt

Regional Dress of Latin America in a European Context

Patricia Rieff Anawalt

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

A collision of cultures occurred at the time of Spain’s sixteenth-century conquest of the two great empires of the Americas, the Mesoamerican Aztecs of central Mexico and the Andean Inka of today’s Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. Latin America’s present-day traditional dress—the distinctive, non-Western-style clothing still worn by many Central American and Andean Indians—is an amalgam of New World indigenous apparel and Spanish Colonial–period peasant attire: Two contrasting concepts of clothing con

Mexican Headwear

Beverly Chico

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Within the territory known as Mexico, there existed a dramatic division between headwear worn by indigenous tribes prior to, and then after, the Spanish conquest of the 1500s. This sudden break was most evident when huge feathered headdresses worn by the ruling elite Aztec and Maya kings and warriors disappeared, to be replaced by European wigs and plumed hats on Spanish government officials, tall miters for Roman Catholic Church hierarchy, and metallic helmets on soldier-conquistadors. The desig

Ponchos of the River Plate: Nostalgia for Eden

Ruth Corcuera

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Rooted in elements that define the Argentine patrimony, the poncho is present in our art, our literature, our songs. It speaks to us of Creole customs and its recollection fragments into infinite images. The poncho is, as is well known, a rectangular garment generally measuring 1.8 m by 1.4 m; it has an opening in the center enabling the wearer to pull it over his head and leave it resting on his shoulders, from which it falls in harmonious and baggy folds, amply covering the body and arms. Depen

Gaucho Dress

Moira F. Harris

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The Spanish introduced the horse and horned cattle to the New World, and the first horsemen of North and South America were the indigenous residents of the Pampas and plains. Later, the emigrants who dealt with these animals, from the southern gaucho to the northern cowboy, came to symbolize the region by their lifestyle and their dress. The earliest gauchos dealt in contraband hides and tallow, and were considered as vagabonds. Then, in the nineteenth century, they became soldiers in the wars fo

Nga Aho Tipuna (Ancestral Threads): Maori Cloaks from New Zealand

Amiria Henare

Source: Clothing as Material Culture 2005

Book chapter

According to Maori anthropologist Te Rangihiroa (Peter Buck), the production of textiles through whatu or finger weaving developed from basketry techniques brought to New Zealand from Eastern Polynesia by the ancestors of Maori people, whose arrival is generally placed between the tenth and thirteenth centuries AD (1926: xviii). Although it is called ‘weaving’, the technique actually involves a kind of twining (Fig. 7.2), in which single or double pairs of wefts are wrapped around each warp threa

Textile Arts of the Mapuche of Chile

Grace Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The Mapuche, whose name means “people of the land,” still live close to the land and follow their traditions, which explains the survival of their culture and textiles. In pre-Hispanic times, they were nomadic fishermen and hunter-gatherers, clad in furs. After becoming farmers, they became skilled in weaving, basketry, and pottery. In the mid-fifteenth century, the powerful Inkas invaded Chile. Although unable to conquer the Mapuche, Inka influence on Mapuche culture was considerable. Among othe

Contemporary Ecuador

Lynn A. Meisch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Ecuador is a small, geographically and ethnically diverse country of 153,822 square miles (398,397 square kilometers), about the size of Oregon. It has three major geographic regions: the hot and humid Pacific Coast; the rainy, sweltering Oriente or Amazon rain forest; and the cool Andean highlands or sierra. The climates of these regions have influenced dress since earliest times.Most of the population is concentrated in Ecuador’s two largest cities, Guayaquil on the coast and the capital Quito

The Traveler’s Eye: Chinas Poblanas and European-inspired Costume in Postcolonial Mexico

Kimberly Randall

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Firstly, for a better understanding of the role that fashion played in the early independence period, a brief overview of colonial history and society is necessary. The personal experiences of those who participated in the conquest helped to shape the colonial experience, influencing the generations to come. These first Spanish settlers of Mexico or New Spain as it was known, included groups of lesser gentry, especially those young men who had been cut off from the family fortune by the rules of

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