Results: Text (67) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 67 (3 pages)
    Page 1 of 3
David Bowie

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

David Bowie is the musician most closely associated with glam rock, a genre of music that enjoyed great popularity in the 1970s, particularly in the United Kingdom. Glam rock was more than just music: it was about epic, elaborate concert productions, exuberant costumes and makeup, and playful exploration of gender identity. Bowie was born Robert David Jones on 8 January 1947 in Brixton, London. In the late 1960s, Bowie began a career as a psychedelic folk rock singer with several singles and the

Léon Bakst

Waleria Dorogova

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Léon Bakst (1866–1924), while not a style icon in the conventional sense, is well known to have profoundly influenced fashion throughout the twentieth century. Vanity Fair declared as early as 1914 that Bakst “has done more to revolutionize costume than any man since Adam.” His vibrant designs for the costumes and settings of the Ballets Russes in the period between 1909 and 1922 have enduringly inspired fashion designers to a substantially higher degree than his less well-known work in couture o

Marilyn Monroe

Joanne B. Eicher

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Marilyn Monroe, born Norma Jeane Mortenson, sometimes using Baker (1 June 1926–5 August 1962), began her career as a model. Signing a film contract in 1946, she played minor roles, receiving attention for her beauty, curvaceous body, and mode of dressing. With prominence, she became a sex symbol. She adeptly helped create her visual persona by learning makeup and strategic wardrobe techniques. She relied on costumers like William Travilla to help construct her image in films like Gentlemen Prefer

Koji Tatsuno

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Luciano Soprani

Nanna Marie Lund

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Giorgio Armani

Nanna Marie Lund

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Antony Price

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Dancewear on the Catwalk, 1970s–2000s

Katerina Pantelides

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This article describes the influence of dance practice and performance clothing on fashion ca.1970–2005. It begins with an exploration of historic correspondences between fashion and dance, and then considers how the so-called “dance boom” in 1970s New York, which flooded both the City and fashion editorial pages with professional and amateur dancers, inspired fashion designers, photographers, and stylists to blur the boundaries between dance practice wear and quotidian dress. The article also de

Max Azria

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Amanda Wakeley

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Ronaldus Shamask

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Hanae Mori

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Paco Rabanne

Daphne Stylianou

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Veronique Leroy

Tory Turk

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Akihabara and Ikebukuro: Playing with Costume as Entertainment

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Fashioning Japanese Subcultures 2012

Book chapter

After the start of radio broadcasting and the invention of television, Akihabara became, in the early 1950s, Japan’s largest electronics district; it was the place to purchase electronics. As consumption increased among the Japanese population, so did the popularity of Akihabara in Japan and even overseas. Foreigners and tourists visited Akihabara to purchase Japanese electronics, such as refrigerators, ovens, Walkmans, rice cookers, and DVD players, at reasonable prices.

Dress in Kiribati

Petra M. Autio

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Republic of Kiribati is a central Pacific state, which consists of thirty-three tiny atolls and reef islands scattered over a vast ocean area corresponding to one-third the size of the United States. It includes three island groups—the Gilbert, Phoenix, and Line Islands—and the island of Banaba. Apart from the Banabans, who have their own, though related, history, the Gilbert Islands chain straddling the equator is where people originally settled, and where the majority (90%) of the populatio

Performance Dress in Japan

Monica Bethe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In early-twenty-first-century Japan, theater and dance performances range from the avant-garde to traditional performing arts that trace their beginnings to periods spanning over a thousand years. The costumes worn for these traditional performances reflect styles of dress prevalent at various historical periods, though not necessarily the period corresponding to the inception of the art in question. The story of performance costume must therefore be seen against the background of the history of

Bollywood Fashion

Vandana Bhandari

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In its early years, Indian cinema showcased the culture and traditions of the country, with mythology, religion, and history providing the predominant themes. The custom of wandering minstrels who would narrate legends and stories from the epics in villages, fairs, and marketplaces was an integral part of Indian culture. Dance and drama were a necessary component of the storytelling tradition, and the roots of Indian cinema go back to this. One of cinema’s earliest exponents was Dada Saheb Phalke

Theatrical Costume

Whitney Blausen

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

When theater reemerged, it did so, ironically, in the context of the church. The Christian church was the sworn enemy of the drama (perceiving it to be both immodest and akin to devil-worshiping). But, since services were performed in Latin, which fewer and fewer parishioners could understand, priests had to devise a way to dramatize the liturgy.

Explore
Costume Designer

Whitney Blausen

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

An article in the New Idea Women’s Magazine says that by 1906 theatrical costume design firms flourished in most major cities. Some, like Eaves or Van Horn’s, in New York and Philadelphia respectively, began as manufacturers of uniforms or regalia and expanded into the theatrical market. By contrast, Mrs. Caroline Siedle and Mrs. Castel-Bert, both in New York, established their ateliers specifically to cater to the growing theater industry.

Performance Dress in China and Taiwan

Alexandra B. Bonds, Dongshin Chang and Elizabeth Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Over three hundred forms of indigenous theater entertainment incorporating song and music have evolved in China, with different forms of music-dramas being performed in specific regions throughout the country. Among these forms, Kunqu (songs of Kunshan) took shape in the Lower Yangtze region of China in the mid-sixteenth century, attained national popularity in the following two centuries, and is still thriving in the early twenty-first century. Jingju (capital drama), commonly known in the West

Masquerade, Theater, Dance Costumes

Herbert M. Cole

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

African masquerades, perhaps the continent’s premier art form, play grandly with illusion, ambivalence, and paradox. Masks and masquerades are both more, and less, than what they appear to be. Their illusionist play can be comic and lighthearted, or deeply serious, but always it is creative and imaginative, art and artifice. Never is it ordinary, and usually it is deeply meaningful and sometimes powerfully instrumental. Masquerades both create and help organize values and knowledge, and they are

Igbo in Nigeria and Diaspora

Herbert M. Cole

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

One of the largest populations of West African peoples at over twenty million, the Igbo have a history of dress and personal decoration lasting over one thousand years. The archaeological sites of Igbo Ukwu, dating from the ninth and tenth centuries c.e., begin this record in the heart of Igbo country, twenty-five miles (forty kilometers) east of the Niger River and about one hundred miles (one hundred sixty-one kilometers) north of the Atlantic Ocean. Although the documentation is largely blank

Masquerade Dress

Cynthia Cooper

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Masquerade rituals and entertainments popular in North America were initially derived from European tradition and fashionable practices. Mummering and Mardi Gras, both forms of masked celebration that had roots in the Middle Ages in Europe, took on their own unique character in the specific regions of Canada and the United States where they persisted. When the European vogue for public masquerade declined at the beginning of the nineteenth century in favor of private fancy dress balls and parties

Historical Dress in French Film

Jennie Cousins

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Films featuring recreations of historical dress have long been a staple of French cinema. Genres such as the war film, the historical film, and the colonial film all frequently feature costumes informed by the past, yet it is the costume drama that has come to be most readily associated with historical dress. Indeed, in this type of film, costume has become inseparable from drama. Despite falling in and out of favor with film critics, academics, and audiences alike, the costume drama has never be

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 67 (3 pages)
Page 1 of 3