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Collar and Neckline Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesCollar and neckline designsCowl designsThe focal point of a garment is the neckline. Collars frame the face and, in most cases, are noticed before other details of the garment. It is important that a collar be flattering and that effort be spent in carefully draping and trueing the desired collar design.

Cowl Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Cowl designsA cowl features deliciously draped necklines or underarm areas that have falling, soft folds. Cowls are draped on the bias, usually in lighter, finer fabrics to enhance a soft, harmonious look. A Bodice and blouse designscowl blousecowl blouse or dress design can be draped subtly or to add imaginative zing to an otherwise low-key garment. When draping a cowl design, the drape should be done in the same fabric weight as the finished design.

Casual Dress Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesCasual dress designsDresses come in many shapes and lengths with a variety of seams, necklines, sleeves, and collars. They are worn for work or play, for day or night, for any occasion, and all year round.

Necklines

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

When drawing any neckline, you must be aware that the shape is going around the neck completely and that it relates to the shoulders and chest area as well. As you can see from the turned and profile views of the neck, it is also higher in the back than the front.

Drapery, Bias, and Cowls

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Draped garments usually involve the direction of fabric called the bias. Fabric is woven with a crosswise and lengthwise direction. The bias is the diagonal direction extending across the grain of the fabric. The bias has a round, very elastic quality. It also has the ability to cling and fall and follow the curves of the body in a very sensual way.

T-shirts, Tops, and Sweaters

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

T-shirts started out as undergarments, evolving from one-piece union suits into separate tops and bottoms. The tops were made long enough to tuck into the bottoms. Workers began wearing them as lightweight shirts in hot climates. They became popular in the United States when the U.S. Navy issued them to be worn under uniforms. It became common for sailors and marines to remove their uniform jackets while working on board submarines and tropical climates, wearing the T-shirt with uniform pants.

Dresses

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The decision to underline or line a knit dress should be made once the fabric has been chosen. Keep in mind that underlining or lining doubles the cost and time it takes to construct the garment. Both the garment fabric and the underlining or lining have to be purchased, cut out, and stitched. When under deadline, designers may prefer to choose another fabric that doesn’t need to be underlined or lined.

The Skill of Couture Draping

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Grainline refers to the orientation of the yarns in a woven fabric. The lengthwise grains run along the length of the fabric and are called the warp yarns. The yarns that are woven in and out perpendicular to the warp yarns are called the weft yarns. These run side to side forming the cross grain of the fabric. The weft yarns are woven to form selvage on both sides of the fabric. The selvage is a finished edge that is formed by the weft yarns being woven, rotating side to side. (Figure 5.2)

Neckline Plackets

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Ungaro, Fall/Winter 1987

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The major trend for fall/winter 1987 was short, skintight dresses and low necklines. Designers crafted garments that emphasized women’s bodies, and “Emanuel Ungaro in Paris, for example, presented the most blatant of sexy statements with panache, wit and skill,” according to journalist Carrie Donovan. Ruching, ruffles, and frills were prominent. High necklines abounded: Ungaro employed these as design features as he liked to emphasize the graceful shape of a woman’s neck.

Anne Klein

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

John Rocha, Spring/Summer 1988

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

For the spring/summer 1988 season, the concept of power dressing still guided designers. Menswear continued to provide inspiration for both the silhouettes and the materials for women’s wear. Rocha offered work-appropriate looks with an overall softer feel, with added feminine details such as a crochet lace collar. The hourglass shape was key to the collection, with many of the dresses featuring a fitted bodice that opened up into a voluminous skirt. Rocha used different necklines to distinguish

Givenchy Couture, Fall/Winter 1990

Aimee Williams

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Two years after the acquisition of Givenchy by Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessey (LVMH), Givenchy’s fall/winter 1990 collection struggled to negotiate its legacy as a couture line and produce designs to appeal to a contemporary clientele. Elements that had worked in favor of the house in the 1980s drew criticism. While other designers unstructured their silhouettes, Givenchy presented square shoulders on wool suits and evening wear alike. Gold lamé and organza dresses with short, dipping hemlines were

Necklines

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The inset band sets the neckline. It is composed of two layers of fabric (not facing) and can vary in shape and width according to the garment design. The following are three examples of inset band necklines. One of them is for woven fabrics, and the others are for knit fabrics. Drafting this neckline for woven fabrics is simple, because the band is the same shape as the neckline and can be traced from the pattern. However, for knit fabrics, there are extra measuring and drafting steps.

Technical Design Terms for Silhouettes and Design Details

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Built-Up Necklines

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A bateau neckline extends beyond and away from the neckline. Two styles of the bateau are given: one with a tuck-dart in front (Figure 1a), the other without a dart (Figure 1b).

Cowls

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Cowls can be draped with or without pleats/gathers and with few or many folds. Cowls can fall at varying depths, creating a soft look to any garment. Cowls are designed to fall from the shoulders, neckline, armholes, or waist of dresses, gowns, blouses, pants, jackets, and coats. With the help of a brooch or clip, the cowl can be pulled in any direction to create interesting design effects (see Design b in Figure 1).

Dress Form and Model: Preparation and Measurements

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

For more than 140 years, dress forms have been adapted to the whims of fashion by constant modifications of their shape and measurement to satisfy the needs of changing silhouettes. Original forms were shapeless, willow-caned models with woven mounds that were padded to individual specifications. Today's forms are partially made by hand. They are framed in metal, molded with papiermâché, laid over with canvas, and covered in a Princess garment of linen. The seam lines of the cover garment set the

Garments and Garment Details

Bina Abling

Source: Fashion Sketchbook, 6th Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Necklines move above or below the base of the neck. They often follow the basic sewing lines on the torso. Collars are connected to the neckline, draped above or below the neck, set down on the shoulders or spread across the chest. To dress the neck, to draw and design necklines and collars, utilize the sewing lines on the torso as a guide. Collars sewn above the base of the neck usually follow the cylindrical form of

Details and Trim

Evelyn L. Brannon

Source: Designer’s Guide to Fashion Apparel, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“I embellish everything I touch.”

Necklines

Nora M. MacDonald

Source: Principles of Flat-Pattern Design, 4th Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Lowered necklinesare below the basic neck seamline. The designer can produce any shape neckline and lower it to any point desired on the basic sloper. Front and back necklines often are not lowered the same amount. When one neckline is lower the other remains relatively high. Low, plunging necklines need an accompanying high neckline, or a fitted underbodice, to keep the garment from falling off the shoulders. Necklines lowered 2 inches or less are created by a designer by drawing the new neck de

Necklines & Collars

Bina Abling and Kathleen Maggio

Source: Integrating Draping, Drafting, and Drawing, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Many classic design and construction nuances for the necklines and collars of garments go in and out of style. Here are a few examples of what to draw or what defines some of these options.

Camisole

Laura Nugent

Source: Computerized Patternmaking for Apparel Production, 2008, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The measurements of the front and back waistlines are needed to make the peplum. To get the measurements, click Measure > Perimeter 2 Pt/Measure Along Piece. Measure the waistlines without the dart spacing and on the dotted seam line (see Figure 7.14).

Collar and Neckline Theory and Development

Lori A. Knowles

Source: The Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers: Juniors, Misses, and Women, 2005, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter introduces some of the techniques used to create necklines and collars that fit properly. Many more collar and neckline shapes are demonstrated throughout the rest of the text; however, this chapter introduces the basic concept of the relation of the collar neckline shape to the fit of the collar. It also shows how to correct the fit of the basic sloper once part of the neckline is trimmed away or added to, as in the case of the funnel neckline. Additional examples of dart manipulati

Details

Injoo Kim and Mikyung Uh

Source: Apparel Making in Fashion Design, 2002, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Although the main function of the button is to fasten, it can be used as a decorative element as well. There are two basic types of buttons: sew-through and shank. A sew-through button has two or four holes for attachment to the garment, whereas a shank button has a shank attached to the underside. When stitching a sew-through button to the garment, it is necessary to make a thread shank at the base of the button that is 1/16″ long for thin fabric, and ⅛″ long for thick fabric.

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