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Collar and Neckline Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesCollar and neckline designsCowl designsThe focal point of a garment is the neckline. Collars frame the face and, in most cases, are noticed before other details of the garment. It is important that a collar be flattering and that effort be spent in carefully draping and trueing the desired collar design.

Jacket Silhouettes and Collar/Lapel Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Lapel designs, jacketsCollar and neckline designsThe jacket is an item of clothing that is worn over other clothing. The focus for jackets is on alternating lengths and volumes, combining with comfortable lines and collars. Some are made in double-breasted or single-breasted manner, while others have no closing and some are closed with a zipper or buttons.

Sleeves, Collars and Circles

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Collar Eton,fundamentals,With a unique sleeve design, and no other design features, a garment can look extraordinary. Sleeves are an important part of pattern cutting; the pattern cutter must be sensitive to this – after all, the exact length and angle of a shoulder line could be critical to the designer's ‘handwriting’ of the season. A pattern cutter must also consider the best type, shape and fit of sleeve to express the design. There is a distinct relationship between shoulder and sleeve, and

Pattern Cutting

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This is the point at which pattern cutting becomes much more creative and exciting. Once the design has been completed, the process of breathing life into a flat design drawing in order to achieve an actual garment can begin. To be able to achieve a beautiful garment shape takes time and experience. Remember, nothing ever happens without practicing your skills—don’t be disheartened if it doesn’t work first time round. All outstanding fashion designers and creative pattern cutters have worked for

Collars

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Any collar can be cut on the straight, cross, or bias grain or can be mitered on the bias at the center back. However, these different grain lines are most evident on striped collars. The bias-cut collar has the most stretch to it and is often chosen by designers because of its beautiful roll line.

Tailored Clothing

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

1 First, block off the structure on an underdrawing.

Method To This Madness

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Collars

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Layout and Cutting

Roberto Cabrera and Denis Antoine

Source: Classic Tailoring Techniques for Menswear. A Construction Guide, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Carven

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Balenciaga

Casey Mackenzie Johnson

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Design Variations and Effects of Grading on Garment Style

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By this point the reader should be familiar with the grade rules necessary to grade basic garment designs and how a grade is distributed through a pattern. A solid foundation in patternmaking is essential for a pattern grader. It is possible: if a patternmaker can grade a basic sloper, then he or she would be able to develop a garment pattern of any size by using a sloper of the selected size. This is the basic principle by which a patternmaker can use a computer-assisted drawing (CAD) system to

Grading with multiple x,y Axes

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Grading manually or by computer requires the movement of cardinal points in x and y directions on a Cartesian graph. The Cartesian graph was introduced in Chapter 3, where a single set of x,y axes was discussed. The procedure for moving the pattern along the axes is illustrated in Chapter 3, and grading examples of the basic blocks and other basic styles are given in Chapters 5, 6, and 7.

Button and Buttonhole Placement Worksheet A (Shirt with Front Band and Mandarine Neck)

Julie Cole and Sharon Czachor

Source: Sample Workbook to Accompany Professional Sewing Techniques for Designers, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Collars

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Every type of collar (except the standing collar) has three structures: the sewing line, the collar roll line, and the collar edge (see Figure 4.1).

Shape and Support

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Collars

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Collar edge: The design part of a collar.

Jacket/Coat Foundations and Designs

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The two illustrations mark and label the important terms associated with jackets and coats. The terms should be learned and understood for better communication in the design room.

High-End Rendering Techniques

Bina Abling

Source: Fashion Sketchbook, 6th Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Ruffles are sewn in a strip or band of fabric gathered into a bunch of folds that are held in place by a seam. The opposite side is the hemline of the ruffle. It rolls, curls, and pops with the drape of the ruffle depending on its direction—up, down, or sideways. The difference between a ruffle and a flounce is that a flounce does not have gathers.

Garments and Garment Details

Bina Abling

Source: Fashion Sketchbook, 6th Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Necklines move above or below the base of the neck. They often follow the basic sewing lines on the torso. Collars are connected to the neckline, draped above or below the neck, set down on the shoulders or spread across the chest. To dress the neck, to draw and design necklines and collars, utilize the sewing lines on the torso as a guide. Collars sewn above the base of the neck usually follow the cylindrical form of

Details and Trim

Evelyn L. Brannon

Source: Designer’s Guide to Fashion Apparel, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“I embellish everything I touch.”

Assembly and Finishing

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Apparel Production Management and the Technical Package, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Most people who sew at home know garment components as the trims: zippers, buttons, and so on. If you were to look at retail patterns for home sewing, you would see these items listed as components. However, in manufacturing, all parts of the garment are considered components—there is no distinction between body components and trim components. Later, when you learn about the technical package, there will be a fabric sheet and a component/trim sheet (which can be confusing), but on the sewing floo

Design Details

Milva Fiorella Di Lorenzo

Source: Tailoring Techniques for Fashion, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After you have read this chapter, you should be able to discuss:

Collar Styles

Sally M. Di Marco

Photography by Erika Yuille

Computer-Assisted Drawings and Draping by Katarina Kozarova

Source: Draping Basics, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The purpose of the collar is to add style interest to the garment, to finish the neckline of the garment, and to complement the wearer. Introduced in this chapter are several foundation collar types such as the stand-up collar, flat collar, and the roll collar. The look of the collar can be changed by altering the width or reshaping the outer edge. The neckline seam of the garment can also be changed and a new collar pattern developed. Collars can be enhanced by trims, ruffles, or other decorativ

Collars

Nora M. MacDonald

Source: Principles of Flat-Pattern Design, 4th Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Aflat collarlies against the body and has no stand; however, a slight roll is produced so that the collar covers the neck seamline. The neckline curve of the flat collar duplicates the neckline curves of the bodice front and bodice back basic slopers. When reproducing the sloper neckline curve, an adjustment is made in placing the bodice front and bodice back slopers in relation to each other. This adjustment shortens the collar style line to produce a slight roll at the neckline in order to cove

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