Results: Text (150) Images (0)

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 150 (6 pages)
    Page 1 of 6
Consumer safety and product labeling guidance

Deanna Clark-Esposito

Source: A Practical Guide to Fashion Law and Compliance, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The laws governing mandatory label disclosures have three broad and collective labellinggoalsgoals:

Materials and Graphics Used in Visual Merchandising and Store Design

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The more a designer knows about the woodcharacteristics ofcharacteristics of wood and its source, the better he or she can understand the degree of warmth and beauty it can bring to the fix-turing or store design. Every grain pattern is a unique masterpiece of design, texture, and wonder. These grain patterns also known as “figures or growth rings,” describe the texture found in wood such as BirdseyeBirdseye, curly, or fiddlebackfiddleback. Wood can be warm and welcoming or cool and contemporary,

Point-of-Purchase Display

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

plywoodimpulse shopping andbalancedefinedplywoodas displayersplywoodas displaysplywoodas fixturesPoint of purchase (POP) has been around since long before the cigar store Indian sculpted out of wood, clutching a handful of tobacco leaves, and garishly painted in green, red, and gold. It stood outside cigar stores and tobacco shops announcing to one and all on the street that tobacco products were sold just inside. Point-of-purchase signage probably goes back even further than the Middle Ages, whe

History, Art, and Plastic Bags: Viewing South Africa Through Fashion

Victoria L. Rovine

Source: Modern Fashion Traditions. Negotiating Tradition and Modernity through Fashion, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Victoria Rovine develops a fascinating reflection as to how a prosaic global commodity, namely, the ubiquitous plastic bag, has become a fashion icon in South Africa. Labelled as ‘China bags’ (reflecting their country of manufacture), Rovine explores the collections of two South African fashion designers who base their work around the potential of these plastic containers. They have transformed the global bag into a distinctively local fashion icon as a symbol of the mixed messages of postmoderni

Leather and Fur

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Making leather is a highly specialized and time-consuming operation. Because of the time involved, the leather industry must anticipate and predict trends far in advance of other textile suppliers. Leather producers typically decide what production method, textures, finishes, and colors they will use eight to sixteen months before a leather reaches apparel and accessory manufacturers. As a result, those in other fashion industries often look to the leather industry for leadership, particularly in

“We Also Should Walk in the Newness of Life”: Individualized Harlem Style of the 1930s

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

With the visual arts of the 1920s and 1930s anchored by black peoples, we can recollect and reimagine this twentieth-century moment when Harlem was not only “in vogue”, or “on the minds” of a complacent few, but also a geo-political metaphor for modernity and an icon for an increasingly complex black diasporal presence in the world.

Fiber Classification: Synthetic Fibers

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By 1939, the process of manufacturing fibers extended to using resources such as petroleum products, petrochemicals, natural gas, and coal. The raw materials undergo complex processes necessary to spin the materials into fiber. DuPont created the first purely chemical fiber, called fiber 66. Today this fiber is called nylon.

Minor Fabrications

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The fabrics in this category are made without yarn. Without yarns, there is no organized structure or thread count. Because yarn construction is labor intensive, fabrics made without yarns offer significant cost savings over those made with yarns. Additionally, nonwoven fabrics are often softer and more elastic than their woven or even knitted counterparts. The fibers are blown onto a collection surface and held together by entanglement (or needlepunching), heat fusion (if thermoplastic), or adhe

Surface-Specific Techniques

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Felted woven fabrics are shrunk and compressed with heat, moisture and friction to produce a dense appearance. Some of the better-known felted fabrics are loden, melton or fleece. The edges of a felted fabric do not fray, so seams can be left unfinished. It is most common to use a plain stitched seam with top-stitching or a welt seam for light- to medium-weight felted fabric. But there are many more techniques to choose from, such as the following:

Rendering Concepts

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

For the purposes of this book, we will group the fabrics into four categories, which include: (1) wool and other textured fabrics; (2) shiny fabrics; (3) sheers; and (4) prints. To help you understand these breakdowns and categories, let's take a look at each one.

Textiles: Fibers and Fabrics

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fashion and the materials from which they are made are inseparable. Have you ever bought a fashion product simply because you loved the feel of it? Perhaps it was rough and coarse or silky and smooth. Maybe it was incredibly soft to the touch. If so, then you, like almost everyone else, have responded to a fabric rather than to the style or color of a fashion product.

Leather and Fur

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Prehistoric people discovered that the animals they killed for food could serve another purpose, that of providing them with warmth and protection from the elements. Today, leather and fur are vital to the apparel, home furnishings, and automotive industries, contributing the raw materials for coats and jackets, handbags, shoes, gloves, and an ever-widening range of fashion products.

Ten: Quality, In the Nick of Time: Shinola

Joseph H. Hancock

Source: Brand Story. Cases and Explorations in Fashion Branding, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A 2014 Economist article titled “Mo’ time for Motown” lightheartedly related the history of Shinola. Tom Kartsotis, the founder of Bedrock Manufacturing (named for the famous Flintstone’s cartoon’s home-town), bought the name for the company from a longtime brand of shoe polish (founded in 1907) that was best known for the slogan “You can’t tell shit from Shinola.” This was absolute perfection for Kartsotis, who believes that this company can someday become the largest manufacturer of high-qualit

The Art of Textiles

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Textiles are used by designers as their primary creative medium. For the designer, choosing the right fabrics for a particular design is one of the most important aspects of designing. Often the fabric itself can inspire the design; for example, soft, drapey fabric can inspire the designer to focus on gathers and ruffles. Most experienced designers can picture their designs completely finished and ready to go before the garments are done, and each and every one understands the importance of match

Talitha Getty

Osman Ahmed

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Talitha Dina Pol (1940–1971) was born in Bali. After moving to London in 1945, following a traumatic period spent with her birth mother in a Japanese POW camp, Talitha studied at Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts with hopes of becoming an actress. Young, beautiful, and exotic, she was courted and celebrated by London society, becoming the second wife of John Paul Getty Jnr., the son of oil tycoon Paul Getty, in 1966. She wore an all-white, mink-trimmed, hooded minidress that echoed the height of Swi

Dsquared2

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

“Coiled Corset,” Shaun Leane for Alexander McQueen, Fall/Winter 1999

Kate Bethune

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The “Coiled Corset” is an example of radical body adornment made by jeweler Shaun Leane for fashion designer Alexander McQueen’s collection “The Overlook” (fall/winter 1999). Leane, who originally trained as a jeweler and goldsmith, first worked with McQueen in 1995, when he made silver watch chains for his “Highland Rape” collection (fall/winter 1995). His creative collaborations with McQueen soon propelled him to work with new materials and on a much larger scale to create elaborate body sculpt

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Prada

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Consuelo Castiglioni

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Gianfranco Ferré

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Mulberry

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Ann Demeulemeester, Spring/Summer 1992

Elisa De Wyngaert

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The spring/summer collection of 1992 was Ann Demeulemeester’s first fashion show in Paris. She presented her looks alongside other young avant-garde Belgian designers, including Martin Margiela. The silhouettes of the collection featured some elements which would later become known as Demeulemeester’s signatures: feathers, a strong cut, and a kind of androgyny blended with poetic femininity. Yet these silhouettes also deviated from the monochromatic feel of her later work. Furthermore, Patti Smit

Vivienne Westwood, “Anglomania,” Fall/Winter 1993–1994

Hayley-Jane Edwards-Dujardin

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

From being queen of punk in the mid-1970s, Vivienne Westwood slightly moved, from the 1980s, to being a supporter of British fashion’s establishment. Inspired by traditional craftsmanship and eighteenth-century art, the designer has since infused her collections with historicism. With her fall/winter 1993–1994 “Anglomania” show, Vivienne Westwood epitomized her interest in English and Scottish traditions while mingling masculine tailoring with outrageously feminine forms. Featuring laced bodices,

Dai Rees

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 150 (6 pages)
Page 1 of 6