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Materials and Graphics Used in Visual Merchandising and Store Design

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The more a designer knows about the woodcharacteristics ofcharacteristics of wood and its source, the better he or she can understand the degree of warmth and beauty it can bring to the fix-turing or store design. Every grain pattern is a unique masterpiece of design, texture, and wonder. These grain patterns also known as “figures or growth rings,” describe the texture found in wood such as BirdseyeBirdseye, curly, or fiddlebackfiddleback. Wood can be warm and welcoming or cool and contemporary,

Point-of-Purchase Display

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

plywoodimpulse shopping andbalancedefinedplywoodas displayersplywoodas displaysplywoodas fixturesPoint of purchase (POP) has been around since long before the cigar store Indian sculpted out of wood, clutching a handful of tobacco leaves, and garishly painted in green, red, and gold. It stood outside cigar stores and tobacco shops announcing to one and all on the street that tobacco products were sold just inside. Point-of-purchase signage probably goes back even further than the Middle Ages, whe

Introduction

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

When Western clothing began to reveal the shape of the body in the twelfth century, cloth needed to be cut into shapes and the shapes became more complex in each century, thus requiring guides or patterns to form appropriate shapes to fit the body. The paper pattern ultimately became that guide; however, as Frieda Sorber observed in the exhibition catalog Patterns from the MoMu in Antwerp, “The history of the paper pattern is almost as elusive as the ephemeral nature of the object itself” (Heaven

The Pattern Industry

Carol Anne Dickson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The pattern industry in the United States and Canada had as its antecedents a number of earlier attempts to simplify the making of garments. The first patterns, made by cloistered monks, consisted of only two pieces. In the thirteenth century, French master tailor Charles Daillac began making his patterns out of thin pieces of wood. In the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries, fashion journals began to appear, illustrating and describing the increasingly complex fashions of the times. In

Paper Dresses

Kathleen Paton

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Future Fibers: Natural Fibers

Annie Gullingsrud

Foreword by Lynda Grose

Illustrations by Amy Williams

Source: Fashion Fibers. Designing For Sustainability, 2001, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Piñatex™ is a biological fiber derived from pineapple leaves. It is a nonwoven textile that is suitable as an alternative to leather.

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