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Tweed: Terms, Descriptions, and Characteristics

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The word tweed began to be used to denote woolen cloths from Scotland in the twill weave from the 1830s.The Satirist, September 2, 1838, front cover. Before that decade, its only form was the proper noun, Tweed, which is the name of a river that flows through the Scottish Borders region. That river became well known throughout Britain and to an extent, Europe, in the early nineteenth century because of its close associations with the famous writer, Sir Walter Scott, who lived near it.D.Watson, “T

Plain Weaves

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The difference between fiber and fabric is one of the most fundamental concepts in textiles and generally one of the most misunderstood. Fibers are the basic building materials. Fabrics are the final result of weaving, knitting, or minor fabrications. Identifying the fiber content is important, but it does not provide the complete picture for predicting performance. Think of describing a house by labeling it as wood. While the house may be built primarily of wood, that description does not create

Plain-Weave Variations: Basket and Rib Weaves

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Like plain weaves, basket-weave construction is perfectly balanced, but two or more yarns act together as one to create the structure. Basket weaves are often represented by multiples in the yarn, such as two to two, three to three, four to four, and so on. See Figure 7.1 for an example of a 2:2 basket weave.

Twill Weaves

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The floats (skipped interlacings that create diagonal wales) found in a twill have the following impact on fabric:

Satin Weaves

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The following list of characteristics applies to satin weaves:

Complex Weaves

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Crepe is a general term for a group of fabrics that are made using one of several methods of construction. This is a reclassification of fabrics previously analyzed. The overview that follows reveals the differences in construction, while maintaining performance expectations. Structure is not a constant in this category.

Pile Weaves

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Pile weaves are made with three sets of yarns: a vertical set (warp), horizontal threads (weft), and a set of yarns making perpendicular loops on the surface of the other two, creating a three-dimensional structure. The warp and weft interlace and form a tightly woven ground weave. With the exception of terry cloth, the perpendicular loops of these fabrics are later sheared and brushed in the finishing process.

Quick Reference Guide Tables

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Swatch Boards

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fabrication

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Every time that I wanted to give up, if I saw an interesting textile, print, whatever, suddenly I would see a collection.”

Project Five—Photoshop: Stripes and Weaves

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Woven Fabrics (Swatches 28–48)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fabric Science

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Designing your own smart textile

Sarah Kettley

Source: Designing with Smart Textiles, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

When working with complex and technological compositions, it is easy to get entangled in time-consuming functional details and thereby lose touch with the overall expression.

Woven Tops

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Woven top spec sheets are used for woven garments, including blouses, shirts, and vests (although companies may have separate spec sheets for vests). As you measure, you will find instances when more than one method can be used for taking a measurement. You learned in Chapter 3 that the high point shoulder measurement is good for blouses with a front opening, and the center front measurement is used for blouses without one. However, a top with a loop closure on the center front opening falls betw

Woven Skirts

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A-line, kick-pleat, straight, and wrap are just a few of the types of woven skirt that can be evaluated using the woven skirt spec sheet. Just like measuring a top, there are times when more than one method of measurement can be used for a measurement point. For example, most skirts are measured at both the high and low hip points. If you are measuring a granny skirt with a large amount of shirring at the waist (see Figure 10.1), the high point measurement will be difficult to obtain accurately.

Woven Pants

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The three most common types of woven pant construction are pleated, darted, and flat front. The waistlines may be high, low, or anywhere in between. Leg widths may be anywhere from slim/stovepipe to full palazzo. Because of such variety there will be instances when more than one point of measurement can be used when evaluating a woven pant. For example, the woven pant shown in Figure 11.1 should be measured at the low hip and seat rather than at the high hip and low hip, because of the low-rise d

Woven Dresses

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Measuring a woven dress basically combines the measurements of a woven top and a woven skirt; therefore, the rules you learned for each of those styles will be used here as well. If needed, look back over Chapters 9 and 10. However, there will be measurement points unique to dresses that are not covered in those chapters; measurement point 91, Hip Width Circumference from High Point Shoulder is an example (see Figure 12.1). As the technician, be sure to decide which measurements are best suited t

Woven Jumpsuits and One-Piece Garments

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The jumpsuit has made a comeback in women’s fashion, not only for eveningwear, but daytime and work wear as well. Measuring woven one-piece garments or jumpsuits basically combines the measurements of a woven top and a woven pant. Therefore, the rules you learned for each of those styles will be used here as well. You may want to look back over Chapters 9 and 11. Figure 13.1 shows that a jumpsuit can be measured from point 153, Front Torso Length, from the high point shoulder to the bottom of the

Woven Fabrics

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Over 4,000 years ago, man created fabric through the use of a crude wood-framed loom. Typically this weaving device held yarns in an upright position as they were interlaced with one another by hand. Primeval man used this to make fabric to clothe and protect. As civilization began to develop, some woven fabric was used to indicate standing within the community. Eventually, royalty and religious figures used ornately woven fabric to indicate their stature. Looms were also used to depict stories i

Materials

Susan M. Watkins and Lucy E. Dunne

Source: Functional Clothing Design. From Sportswear to Spacesuits, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A textile is defined as “any flexible material that is composed of thin films of polymers or of fibers, yarns, or fabrics or products made of films, fibers, yarns, or fabrics.” (Kadolph 2010, 6) The flexible nature of textiles is of great importance to apparel, which needs to move with the human body. Protective clothing systems are often based on textiles and augmented with other types of materials like foams and rigid materials.

Raw Materials Selection and Performance

Janace E. Bubonia

Source: Apparel Quality. A Guide To Evaluating Sewn Products, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fabric is a substrate composed of fiber and yarns that have been woven, knitted, or chemically, thermally, or mechanically bonded. Materials are an important indicator of quality of apparel items and account for a significant portion of the cost of a garment. Materials used in apparel construction are evaluated throughout the design and production processes. Textile inspection, testing, and analysis during the fabric selection phase allow for a better understanding of specification requirements a

Shirts

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The convertible collar and continuous placket of this design also appear in the short-sleeved bowling or Hawaiian shirt. Its classic silhouette includes enough wearing ease to go over the trousers, because it is typically worn untucked.

Pants

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Coats

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Because a coat can be worn over a jacket and a shirt, coat patterns contain the most wearing ease of any garment type. The coat foundation is based on the woven torso sloper, and has ease for ¼″–thick shoulder pads, as does a jacket foundation. Therefore, the patternmaker who wants to design coats without shoulder pads or with pads of different thickness should take this into consideration. There is a difference between the back neck width and the front neck width in the coat foundation compared

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