Results: Text (35) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 35 (2 pages)
    Page 1 of 2
Ghost London

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, Spring/Summer 1984

Veronica Maldonado

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

While most of de Castelbajac’s 1984 spring/summer contained serious and sensible clothes, the finale included a number of rectangular silk dresses screen-printed with images of household items such as US dollar bills, calculators, cigarette packs, and Warholian cans of Campbell’s soup. This was not the first time that de Castelbajac had shown these unconventionally shaped dresses—his previous collection had contained dresses emblazoned with internationally famous faces such as that of Charles de

Vivienne Westwood, Red Label, Fall/Winter 1999

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Quirky, colorful, and colliding: with its juxtaposed styles, influences, and prints, Westwood created a discordant harmony in her fall/winter Red Label collection of 1999. It was the sixth collection that Westwood had produced for her Red Label line, and it was a rapid departure from those of other designers that season. Among Westwood’s peers, the key trends were plain fabrics and creamy, muted colors; Westwood clashed brights, checks, and prints. In contrast to the clean, understated, minimalis

Antoni & Alison

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Blue

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Blue ranks as one of the most variegated shades of the fashion palette, from palest sky blue to blue-black navy. The wild plants (indigo) and precious gems (lapis lazuli) once used to create blue dyes have given way, for the most part, to synthetic chemicals. Designers have channeled bright blues during seasons of vivid coloration, or subtle washes of blue to suggest “no-color” color, with some of the richest colorations used in head-to-toe ensembles. Whether in the blue jean revolution of the 19

Anna Sui, Fall/Winter 1993

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

For the fall/winter 1993 season, Sui blended together fashionable elements from late eighteenth-century France to Edwardian Britain. Despite the disparate elements involved, the looks that Sui created were still in keeping with a romantic, whimsical, and feminine aesthetic. Luxurious fabrics such as velvet and satin in dark fall colors contrasted with pastel shades, and the collection contained the most colors Sui had used up to that time. She went to great lengths to dye and sometimes re-dye the

Wrap Dress, Diane von Furstenberg, 1974

Linda Welters

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The name of Diane von Furstenberg (originally von Fürstenberg) is inextricably linked to the wrap dress that she introduced to American women in 1974. Within two years, she had sold over two million units, a feat that landed her on the cover of the 22 March 1976 issue of Newsweek. The popularity of her sexy, printed, jersey wrap dress waned in the late 1970s. When renewed interest in 1970s styles surfaced in the late 1990s, Diane von Furstenberg reintroduced the wrap dress. Other leading designer

Givenchy Couture, Fall/Winter 1983

Aimee Williams

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Givenchy’s well-received fall/winter 1983 couture collection augured the opulence of the decade. Lavish surfeit came in many options for patrons, from jewel-encrusted leather boleros and skirt suits trimmed with mink and fox fur for day, to sequined metallic gowns for evening. Suede and leather gloves and hats and oversized jewels accessorized hand-painted silk skirts and dresses. The chemise and the hourglass shape prevailed. The former figure came in a range of sumptuous textiles, corresponding

West Africa

Lisa Aronson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

West African markets are well known for their tightly packed displays of textiles in rich arrays of colors and patterns, and tailors on their sewing machines can be heard everywhere sewing visually striking garments that seldom go unnoticed when worn in public. So vital and richly varied are textiles in West Africa that even prominent contemporary artists such as El Anatsui from Ghana and Nigeria and Yinka Shonibare from Nigeria are inspired by them as powerful mediums for discourse on historical

Introduction to Southeast Asia

Ruth Barnes

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Southeast Asia comprises two distinct areas, the mainland and an archipelago of islands extending from Sumatra to the Philippines and the Moluccas. Both the mainland and the archipelago have exceptionally rich traditions of adorning the human body. Dress acts as a social indicator, and dress requirements are associated with religious and social ceremonies. The earliest detailed representations of Southeast Asian dress come from religious edifices dating from the ninth century. Ordinary people’s d

Miao National Minority

Gina Corrigan

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Today, the Miao ethnic minority live in southwestern China, their population totaling 8.9 million. Miao origins and migrations are controversial and poorly documented, but we know that attempts to subdue them have been difficult. Miao in remote mountain regions developed many garments, expressing cultural identity. In 2000 a book published in China illustrated 173 different styles of Miao dress. Following the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, the female population in the countryside again adopted trad

Li National Minority

Anne Csete

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Li national minority of Hainan Island, with a population of 1.24 million, is officially divided into five subgroups: Qi, Ha, Sai, Run, and Meifu. Li dress varies among these subgroups, but common elements include a sarong-like tube skirt, female tattooing, and methods of traditional cloth production. Han cloth and thread were incorporated into Li weaving and embroidery by at least the Song dynasty (960–1279), when significant numbers of Li began to adopt Chinese dress and customs. Li weaving

Nineteenth-Century Medical Views on Dress

Margaret Deppe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Much attention has been given to the social context of clothing in the past as dress and fashion phenomena are critical indicators concerning the economic, political and ideological components of a given society. In England and North America in the nineteenth century, the tight lacing of ladies’ corsets was a function of clothing fashion as well as a fashion in morality and an indicator of social and economic status. Physicians joined dress reformers in repeatedly issuing warnings against tight l

Myanmar

Sylvia Fraser-Lu

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Myanmar, or Burma, has a complex ethnic mix, resulting in Burmese, Chinese, and Tibetan dress influences. Myanmar’s earliest, most lasting contacts were apparently with India. Indian concepts of monarchy, with the cult of godlike kings, were adopted in Myanmar. Myanmar kings on formal occasions were known to wear gold-embroidered robes, emulating the gods. The Indian Laws of Manu stipulated that women were responsible for weaving household clothing. Sixteenth-century travelers to Burma recorded t

The Textile Tradition of Malaysia and Its Impact on Dress

Adline Abdul Ghani

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Maritime trade linked the Malay Peninsula to the world from as early as the first to the eleventh centuries. With the Indian Ocean to the west and the South China Sea to the east, the peninsula held a focal position along two major sailing routes. As an entrepôt connecting the East and West, the peninsula was also constantly exposed to new cultures, influences, ideas, technologies, and materials, and throughout history, trade activity in general has been inextricably linked to developments in loc

Yi National Minority

Stevan Harrell and Bamo Qubumo

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Numbering nearly eight million, the Yi national minority is the seventh largest minority in China. Also known as the Nuosu, they live mainly in the hillside and basin areas of Yunnan province, with significant populations in Sichuan and Guizhou provinces, and the Guangxi Autonomous Region. Among the Nuosu Yi people of the Liangshan region, in the mountains of southwestern Sichuan, clothing and decoration reflect social organization and cultural concepts, expressing aesthetic ideals of womanly bea

Indonesia

Itie van Hout

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Diverse cultural elements have shaped the Indonesian archipelago, changing dress traditions. Before weaving was known, leaves, plant fibers, and barkcloth were used for clothing. Cotton, not native to Indonesia, may have arrived from India. Early clothing probably consisted of loincloths and hip wrappers. Later dress, particularly ceremonial, comprised layers of clothing. Textiles, imbued with magical qualities, were crucial to relationships between the supernatural and human worlds. By the seven

Colonial Influence on the Sarong and Kain in Java

Marianne Hulsbosch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The sarong, a tubular stitched cloth, and the kain, a rectangular cloth, are iconic items in the Indonesian dress lexicon. Both the single rectangular cloth and the tubular cloth are lengths of material that are woven in Indonesia and decorated with ethnic-specific motifs. Men and women drape and pleat a sarong or kain around the body; men drape the kain counterclockwise, and women drape it clockwise. The centrality of all aspects of textiles and the abundance of designs have made cloth a highly

Perfumed Dress and Textiles

Katia Johansen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Perfumed dress and textiles are standard in every culture, yet virtually none have been preserved. Fragrances were once considered to be the souls of objects and therefore sacred. Incense, used worldwide in religious ceremonies, is often noticeable on vestments. Perfuming was used to mask bad odors, for ceremonies, or simply for appeal. Perfuming methods included using incense, sweet bags, oils, and fuming pans. Perfume is generally made of the volatile oils of plants, grasses, spices, herbs, woo

The Textile Industry

Sara J. Kadolph and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Any overview of the textile industry in the United States and Canada will focus primarily on the United States until the latter part of the nineteenth century, as Canada and its textile production were still controlled by Britain until that time. Textile manufacture was one of the first mechanized industries to incorporate outwork production into its manufacturing procedures. An industry of hand-produced lace existed prior to the introduction of English lace machines in Ipswich, Massachusetts, in

Textiles of Central Asia

Abby Lillethun

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Textiles play important roles expressing and sustaining ethnic identity in Central Asia, in part by signifying continuity of family and spiritual beliefs. In addition, textiles have been crucial in transcultural exchange processes as trade commodities in economic systems and as prestige symbols in sociopolitical contexts. Further, Central Asian textiles reflect historical influences of internal groups on each other, as well as influences resulting from contact brought by invasions and trading coh

Uzbek Textiles

Carter Malik

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

After the creation of the independent republic of Uzbekistan in 1991, Uzbek textiles, with their brilliant color combinations and decorative exuberance, drew much interest from the international community and fashion experts. Silk wall hangings, ceremonial robes, and ikat dresses from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries began to appear more often in private collections, galleries, museums, and boutiques around the world. Khan atlas (silk satin-weave ikat), suzani embroidery (needlework)

Flowers in the Art of Dress across the World

Peter McNeil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

When an object or motif is universal, there is a tendency to trivialize it. This is undoubtedly the case with the theme of flowers in its relationship to fashion and textiles. The floral motif is cross-cultural and ubiquitous but is connected in highly specific ways to different systems of social organization, personal adornment, and religious practice. The ways in which flowers and their representations are used highlight attitudes toward covering the body and adorning the head, as well as compl

Shuri Textile Manufacture

Ginko Le Bars Miyahira

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Okinawan archipelago is the only tropical region in Japan; the islands’ abundant vegetation provides suitable material for weaving and dyeing. From 1429 to 1879, the Ryūkyū kingdom united Okinawa, governing under the dynastic title Shō. In the early seventeenth century, Okinawa came under Japanese control. However, the Japanese government found it expedient to continue recognizing the Shō dynasty, enabling the Ryūkyū kingdom to continue trading abroad. In the nineteenth century Okinawa was an

Materials

Giorgio Riello

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Before 1800, fashionable individuals were defined as much by the textiles they chose as the styles they wore. There are characteristics shared by all textiles. First, they were used by people across society to construct notions of worth and appropriateness. Second, their importance in medieval, early modern, and modern European societies was linked to their value. Before industrialization reduced production costs, textiles remained generally luxuries. A third shared characteristic was their ubiqu

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 35 (2 pages)
Page 1 of 2