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Tracing Trends in Heian and Edo

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It is probably impossible to pinpoint a moment or location at which fashion started. Chapter 1 outlined five defining aspects of fashion from a body of fashion fashiontheorytheory, and now we return to the story of kimono, in the light of those five aspects. References to clothing used in functional ways or to uphold custom(s)customs, traditions, or the status quo are to be expected, so here the search is for deviations from such norms. The search is for any shreds of evidence of clothing used in

Point-of-Purchase Display

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

plywoodimpulse shopping andbalancedefinedplywoodas displayersplywoodas displaysplywoodas fixturesPoint of purchase (POP) has been around since long before the cigar store Indian sculpted out of wood, clutching a handful of tobacco leaves, and garishly painted in green, red, and gold. It stood outside cigar stores and tobacco shops announcing to one and all on the street that tobacco products were sold just inside. Point-of-purchase signage probably goes back even further than the Middle Ages, whe

Textiles, trims, findings, and materials

Chelsea Rousso and Nancy Kaplan Ostroff

Source: Fashion Forward. A Guide to Fashion Forecasting, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

trims forecastingtextiles forecastingmaterials forecastingfindings forecastingTextiles, trims, findings, and materials forecasting is a process of collecting, editing, interpreting, and analyzing information to be able to predict the textiles, materials, trims, and findings that will be popular in upcoming seasons. As in theme and color, forecasters research and use their creativity, instinct, and experience to sense tactile shifts. Consumers are greatly influenced by the feel of textilestextiles

Dyed and Printed Fabrics

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Most of us have some understanding of the dye process, whether it is from dyeing our hair or staining a favorite dress. Powdered dyestuff is dissolved in a small amount of hot water. This creates a stock solution, which is highly concentrated liquid dye. The stock solution goes into a pot along with an activator—which makes the color brighter, permanent, and consistent—and the correct amount of water to suspend the dye solution. The more absorbent the fiber, the better it will absorb the water an

Footwear Design, Construction, and Production

Fiona Armstrong-Gibbs and Tamsin McLaren

Source: Marketing Fashion Footwear. The Business of Shoes, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Footwear production is costly and time consuming. Historically, shoes would have been made in the country where they were destined to be sold to the end consumer, where footwear “brands” were signs of good quality and durability rather than style statements. However, in recent times the inevitable and unstoppable development of offshore production, speed of change in fashion, and consumer requirements have meant that the location of footwear production has changed dramatically.

Yarn Basics

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Yarns are the basic materials of the knitting process. Yarns are made from fibers, which are either staple or filament. Staple fibers are naturally short or cut filament fibers that are spun together to create yarn. Filament fibers are continuous in length. Many types of yarns are available, from natural in raw or regenerated form to manufactured synthetics to blends, making the assortment tremendous. Further improvements in technology and in the manufacturing and processing of fibers have made y

Computer-Aided Design for Knitwear

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Doug Ross at MIT coined the phrase “computer-aided design” in 1959.Douglas T. Ross, http://groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/projects/studentaut/ncworld/NCWorld_DR_photo.htm.CAD, by definition, is the use of computer technology as a tool to design products. The products that the programs design and create depend on the user. Specialized CAD programs are used by fashion designers, textile designers, industrial designers, architects, graphic designers, engineers, and a host of others. The list of creative u

Sportswear, Knit, and Print

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Men's fashions all start as sports clothes and progress to the great occasions of state. The tail coat, which started out as a hunting coat, is just finishing such a journey. The tracksuit is just beginning one.

Color Management

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Only those who love color are admitted to its beauty and immanent presence. It affords utility to all but unveils its deeper mysteries only to its devotees.”

Fabrication

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Every time that I wanted to give up, if I saw an interesting textile, print, whatever, suddenly I would see a collection.”

Fabrics and techniques

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

It is of fundamental importance for every designer to understand the unique properties and qualities of fabrics. Choosing the right fabric for a garment is crucial to its success.

Project Twelve—Illustrator: Photoshop and Filters

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Photoshop and Illustrator contrast with traditional media in their extreme predictability. Whereas this is normally to your advantage sometimes as a designer you might want some unexpected variation in the results. This is where Filters and Effects can come to your aid. With Filters and Effects you still have to think as a designer and use your individual creativity. Otherwise, an off-the-peg filter used artlessly can make your work look exactly like someone else’s who has used the same filter.

Yarns (Swatches 16-27)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dyed Fabrics (Swatches 76–80)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Printed Fabrics (Swatches 81–88)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fabric Science

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Thinking “Print”: Graphic Design and Elements in Two Dimensions

Karl Aspelund

Source: Designing. An Introduction, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Designers Speak

Textile Forecasting

Evelyn L. Brannon and Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Forecasting, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Many a dress of mine is born of the fabric alone.

Dyeing and Staining Fabric

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

To dye fabric means to create a chemical bath of a colorant dissolved into water. Fabric is submersed and agitated until the color is sufficiently absorbed—this is known as the immersion technique, or tub dyeing method, a reliable method for even distribution of dye. Often a mordant, or dye carrier, is needed to help the dye adhere to the fabric and to provide colorfastness. The dye binds with the fabric molecularly to create long-lasting, vibrant colors.

Discharging Color and Using Resists

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A negative image or pattern on a dark-colored fabric or leather can be created by removing color (Figure 2.1). Color removal can also be beneficial as an all-over lightener or used before applying other dyes or prints to provide a lighter base, thus creating more vibrant results.

Printing and Transfer

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Printing is the act of applying an easily repeatable pattern to fabric. It can be done on any fabric or leather as long as the dye or paint is appropriate to the fiber content of that fabric (see Appendix A, Burn Test, page 252). A wide range of printing techniques have been in practice for much of human existence. Simple repeatable images can be created using blocks or stamps, while screen printing achieves clean crisp lines on a larger surface area.

Combining Techniques

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Video Tutorial: Combining Techniques

The Textile Industry

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The basic needs of people are food, clothing, and shelter. The textile industry is intertwined with all three of these essential sectors of our lives. Fabrics are used in the food industry to provide plant covers, absorbent liners in prepackaged meats, and reusable cloth bags. The use of fabrics in clothing is well known for its warmth, protection, and aesthetic properties. Fabrics also provide for shelter in the form of tents, building materials, and awnings. Most people don’t realize how much f

Textile Dyeing

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Color is an important marketing factor with textile products. It is the color of the dyed (or printed) fabric that first attracts and then draws consumers to particular items for sale. It is often the color of a product that sells the product. (See Figure 8.1.)

Textile Printing

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Printing is defined as dyeing in a localized, patterned area. Early examples of applying color in the form of a print date back to 3000 BC. The development of blocks and stencils offered consistency to this early form of decoration. Printing with blocks requires the background to be cut away from a flat surface, originally made of wood. Color or dyes are applied to the remaining raised area, thus providing a design when stamped or pressed onto fabric. In stencil printing, the background is left i

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