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Stripes and Plaids

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A stripe is a band of color or texture that may be vertical, horizontal, or diagonal. It can be woven or printed in one or many colors and the stripes may vary in width. Using the center-front principle we can begin to understand vertical and horizontal stripes, which when combined form a pattern called a plaid. A plaid is a design of stripes intersecting at right angles.

Laying Out, Cutting, and Stitching Knits

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

An L-square ruler and a tape measure are required tools you need for laying out and cutting knits. The remaining tools you need are as follows (see also Figure 4.1):

Project Five—Photoshop: Stripes and Weaves

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Fabric

Roberto Cabrera and Denis Antoine

Source: Classic Tailoring Techniques for Menswear. A Construction Guide, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

If you want the very finest fabric for classic tailoring, choose wool. There is an endless variety of beautiful fabrics available to us today, most of which will respond favorably to certain tailoring features. There is no reason to limit your wardrobe to one fabric. However, full tailoring procedures (canvas, haircloth, tape, etc.) will produce their best results for wool. Silk and linen are close seconds.

Breton Stripe Shirt, Jean Paul Gaultier, 1997

Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Throughout Jean Paul Gaultier’s career he has created a recognizable body of work based on iconic looks including trench coats, corsets, and berets, among others. But first and foremost, Gaultier has come to be permanently associated with the Breton stripe top, also known as la marinière, or a “sailor” top. From its origins as a staple of the sailor’s uniform in the Bretagne region of France, then in the entire French navy, the shirt has retained an aura of romance and simplicity that has appeale

Carven

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Sonia Rykiel

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Vivienne Westwood, Spring/Summer 1984

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Models raise their hands in the air as victorious athletes. The stripes that accent their clothing increase the perception of speed and movement as they walk the catwalk, sportily kicking the air as they traverse. Vivienne Westwood’s spring/summer collection of 1984 was named after the ancient Greek personification of sleep, Hypnos, yet deliberately contrasted its namesake with bold, illuminating, and awakening flashes of neon, in a gesture of defiance that is typical of Westwood’s oeuvre.

Missoni

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Yohji Yamamoto, Spring/Summer 1994

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

For Yohji Yamamoto’s spring/summer 1994 collection, white makes an appearance in nearly every look—and these were created with layers, as the fashion designer continued working on redefining men’s wardrobes. Following the trends for the season, several versions of the classic white button-down shirt were presented, including longer versions akin to the Moroccan djellaba. Stripes were also seen on various items of clothing. The collection received mixed reviews from fashion critics.

Defining Prints and Patterns

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The subject of defining patterns is discussed and demonstrated throughout this book and is the focus of this chapter. In later chapters, even more textiles, treatments, and finishes will be covered.

Basic Rendering Techniques

Bina Abling

Source: Fashion Sketchbook, 6th Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

You learned to draw a gesture sketch in Chapter 3. A gesture sketch is the beginning pose premise for either a croquis or a finished drawing. It can be done in line on tracing paper or started by applying fleshtone directly onto marker paper. It won’t matter if there is a pen or pencil outline on the croquis sketch. Rough or more smooth-looking, it is still a loose drawing for content. As you work on your rendering fo

Trick the Eye with Optical Illusions

Evelyn L. Brannon

Source: Designer’s Guide to Fashion Apparel, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“I have always respected the structure of the body and the natural movement of a given fabric. I want people to guess about the shape underneath.”

Stripes and Prints

Bina Abling

Source: Marker Rendering for Fashion, Accessories, and Home Fashion, 2006, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

For all the differences between styles of stripes, awning to pin stripes, or poor boy to nautical, the method for rendering them is the same. It’s all about spacing, planning, and size. What’s the distance between each stripe? What kind of shape do the stripes go on? Where should you start on that shape? There are two answers to where to start. Either in the middle or at the bottom. The middle divides the space into sections. The bottom leaves you room to work your way up into the shape as you fo

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