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Talitha Getty

Osman Ahmed

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Talitha Dina Pol (1940–1971) was born in Bali. After moving to London in 1945, following a traumatic period spent with her birth mother in a Japanese POW camp, Talitha studied at Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts with hopes of becoming an actress. Young, beautiful, and exotic, she was courted and celebrated by London society, becoming the second wife of John Paul Getty Jnr., the son of oil tycoon Paul Getty, in 1966. She wore an all-white, mink-trimmed, hooded minidress that echoed the height of Swi

Bridal Wear

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The evolution of the bridal gown, and its history, aesthetic, and rituals, are significant within our cultural history and have an influence on the contemporary wedding ceremony. Modern designers continue to be influenced by fashion history, or may reflect current styles and concerns. This article predominantly refers to the white wedding gown worn traditionally in Western Christian cultures, its heritage, and the wedding dress as archival object.

Sonja Nuttall

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

White

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

“Pure white” may just be the oldest fashion statement of all time, harking back to Biblical angels and the earliest use of linen recorded by Ancient Egyptians some 4,000 years ago. In modern times, virtually every couture fashion house features fantastical visions of brides in white on the catwalk, while any view of streetwear from the 1970s onward could hardly be complete without the ubiquitous white T-shirt. Once, white collars and cuffs may have been the trappings of the landed gentry, but the

Givenchy Couture, Spring/Summer 1997

Aimee Williams

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Alexander McQueen’s 1997 premiere at Givenchy following John Galliano’s departure resounded notably during the spring/summer couture showings, heralding the “revival of couture.” Showing at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, the Grecian-inspired collection acknowledged the house’s defining conventions with double-breasted ivory suits and straightened silhouettes that hit above the knee. A generally neutral to white palette of silk, finely woven feathers, and gossamer textures

White Suited Men: Style, Masculinity and the Boyband

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion and Music 2011

Book chapter

Women are traditionally seen to be subject to the power systems of men—passive, whilst men are active; private, while men are public; ‘fashionable [when] men are not’ (Craik 1994: 170). Clearly, then, both genders have been subjected to expected ways of being and modes of behaviour which are undoubtedly different, but equally limiting. The expectations of appropriate gender behaviour may change over time. Yet when such change happens, what is never eradicated is a sense of a clearly demarcated, i

Early History of Dress and Fashion in Italy and the Iberian Peninsula

Carmen Alfaro Giner and Maria Giuseppina Muzzarelli

Translated by Ana Alacovska

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Rock engravings in Valcamonica, Italy, indicate the use of looms and thus weaving in the second millennium b.c.e. Tunics were worn by both men and women during pre-Roman times in the Iberian Peninsula.Italian regions colonized by Greece in the eighth century b.c.e. were influenced by Hellenic fashion. The Roman royal period lasted from 753 to 509 b.c.e., followed by the republic and the empire. Clothing during the first two periods was largely austere, although wealth and refinement characterized

Bridal Dress in Japan

Ofra Goldstein-Gidoni

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Modern Japanese wear Western-style clothing (yôfuku). Japanese attire (wafuku) that is clearly distinguished from Western attire is worn mainly on ceremonial occasions, especially for life-cycle events such as weddings, funerals, and the coming-of-age ceremony (seijin shiki) celebrated at the age of twenty. Of all these occasions, the wedding ceremony is marked not only with the most elaborate traditional costumes but also with an unparalleled combination of Japanese and Western dress.

Ta’ovala and Kiekie of Tonga

Fanny Wonu Veys

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The wearing of waist wrappings such as t’ovala and kiekie in modern daily life distinguishes Tongan dress from that of its neighboring Pacific archipelagos. Indeed, the basic working dress of civil servants and the school uniforms of students consist of tailored clothing termed vala faka-palangi (foreigners-style clothing), complemented for both sexes by a ta’ovala or for women by a kiekie. Compared to barkcloth production, both ta’ovala and kiekie can be made by a woman on her own, as the materi

Nguni, Zulu, and Xhosa Dress and Beadwork

Gary van Wyk

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Nguni peoples of South Africa include the Xhosa- and Zulu-speaking peoples of the southeast and northeast coast. Despite shared distant Nguni origins, they are differentiated today by language, culture, tradition, history, and other factors. They have in common remarkable traditions of beadwork, which, together with those of the Ndebele (a Nguni people of the interior), are outstanding among African beadwork.

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