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Manolo Blahnik

Rio Ali

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Katharine Hamnett

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Sophia Kokosalaki

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Junya Watanabe

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Monique Lhuillier

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Fashion and Anthropology

Brent Luvaas

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Anthropologists have largely shied away from the study of fashion, preferring to focus their attention to dress on those everyday items that define an individual as part of an enduring cultural tradition. Only in the last two decades, as anthropologists have shifted their attention to global processes, have they begun to look at fashion specifically as a site of critical enquiry. As they do so, they bring with them a disciplinary attention to the messy and contradictory lived experiences that mak

Florals

Tessa Maffucci

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Floral designs are ubiquitous in fashion. They appear reliably with each new season, spring or fall, as designers attempt to find new ways to iterate this now traditional motif. The history of floral textiles is complex. Flower designs have been intimately tied up with colonialism and the convergence of cultures of dress; however, the patterns themselves are often seen in simplistic terms as signifying femininity or pastoral innocence. Florals can translate the beauty of the natural world onto th

Missoni

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Ronaldus Shamask

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Laura Biagiotti

Laura Snelgrove

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Knitwear in Fashion from 1970

Jo Turney

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Knitwear has a history almost as long as clothing and therefore is a familiar aspect of dress. Most frequently, knitted clothing is associated with women’s creative domestic practice, as it has been associated with thriftiness, philanthropy, and making do, especially during wartime, and thus seems to exist or be understood as outside of the dynamic world of fashion. Yet, most catwalk collections include some knitwear, and it is central to notions of fashion, embracing the Zeitgeist in relation to

Tailoring and the Birth of the Published Paper Pattern

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

Any method more simple or rudimentary than this one published by “A Society of Adepts” can scarcely be conceived. It is really the result of experience and differed scarcely but in name from the plan of cutting by “rock of eye.” It must be regarded as proof that a desire or necessity was felt for some method by which tailors could draft these patterns from measures. In default of any other guide, this work may have been of some assistance to the cutters of that time; otherwise it is remarkable t

Shifting Trends Postwar: 1950s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

The exuberance at the end of the war was expressed by the Paris fashion designer Christian Dior. His New Look in the Spring–Summer 1947 collection is described as a sea change in fashion and had a marked impact on women’s postwar styles (see Figure 138). Anticipating freedom from the fabric restrictions imposed by rationing during the war, Dior emphasized a large bust, small waist, below-mid-calf-length full skirt, and a full peplum emphasizing the hips. The style became immensely popular. Howeve

New Challenges: 1960s–1980s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

A common misconception is that by the 1960s women stopped sewing and making their own clothes due to the mass of inexpensive, readily available ready-to-wear options. However, the 1960s were actually a boom period. The Barron’s article “Profitable Patterns” (1958) reported that pattern companies were generally profitable, with the exception of Vogue. The parent company, Condé Nast, was publishing several magazines and running the pattern division, which operated at a loss. However, the losses “ar

Reinvention and Renaissance: 1980s–2010

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

The 1980s witnessed a burst of computer technological. The technology was incorporated in pattern companies’ business practices in manufacturing and marketing procedures. By 1991, when restricted commercial use of the Internet was lifted, pattern companies embraced it to rapidly market their designs. Companies began to use computer applications to trim costs, to improve inventory control, and to boost productivity. For example, Simplicity used an application to streamline procedures for processi

Development of Dressmaking Patterns: 1800–1860

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

Through the eighteenth century, methods for communicating the latest fashions were limited to word of mouth, fashion dolls known as Pandoras, fashion plates such as Galerie des Modes, and publications for professional tailors.

Nineteenth-century Technology

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

Inventors were experimenting with mechanical sewing by the mid-eighteenth century, but it was not until the mid-nineteenth century that a functioning, practical machine was invented by Barthélemy Thimonnier. In “A Brief History of the Sewing Machine,” Graham Forsdyke explains that Thimonnier’s machine was granted a French patent in 1830. By 1840, he had installed eighty of his machines in his factory for sewing uniforms for the French army. Parisian tailors, who feared the machine would put craft

Early History of Pattern Companies: 1860s–1880s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

Demorest, the first to mass-produce retail patterns for the home sewer in the United States, took advantage of the expanded postal services selling by mail order as well as in retail outlets. Who the actual designer of the first patterns was is somewhat unclear. Mrs. Margaret Demorest (née Poole) is listed as Mme Demorest in Leslie’s Lady’s Gazette of Fashion in July 1854. However, it is believed that William Jennings Demorest employed Ellen Louise Curtis and her sister Kate from the early 1850s

New Markets and Expansion: 1880s–1900

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

By 1880, the six major U.S. pattern companies—Demorest, Butterick, McCall, Harper’s Bazar, Taylor, and Domestic—had positioned themselves in the market. Each published a magazine advertising their patterns for the latest fashions for women, a full complement of children’s clothing, undergarments for all, and shirts, trousers, and various other men’s non-tailored garments.

Shifts and Balances: 1900–1920s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

A dynamic new figure entered the pattern enterprise in the first decade of the new century. Condé Nast was adept at promotion and was attracted to the pattern industry. He organized the Home Pattern Company and distributed dress patterns in an arrangement with Ladies’ Home Journal in 1905 (Seebohm 1982: 32). The Ladies’ Home Journal was an influential women’s periodical with a circulation of 1,000,000 (Mott 1938: vol. 4, 545). Nast had remarkable marketing skills and successfully promoted pattern

Blossoming Economy: 1920–1929

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

While the general economy was experiencing boom years in the period between the end of the First World War and the crash of 1929, not every sewing-related business benefited. Fewer women were making their own clothes or going to custom dressmakers. Since the turn of the century, an increasing number of women had been entering the workplace, and this trend continued after the war. They no longer had the spare time to lavish on making their own clothing, and the ready-made garment industry was offe

Surviving the Depression: 1930s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

Pattern producers repudiate rumors that they enjoyed a boom during the Depression. Like most other businesses, theirs suffers when people are hard up; it recovers when people start spending again. Patterns hit bottom in 1932. Improvement began in the Fall of 1933, but not soon enough to make an increase for the year. Estimates place 1934 ahead of 1933 by about 10%.

The War Years: 1940s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

With the onset of the Second World War in Europe, prosperity began returning to the U.S. and Canadian economies. Both North and South America became major suppliers to Europe, which meant expanded production and therefore more jobs and more money for the consumer to spend. Pattern sales for all the existing companies increased noticeably, except for Butterick, which was still struggling from the problems that began in the late 1920s and were exacerbated by the bankruptcy reorganization in 1935. T

Introduction

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

When Western clothing began to reveal the shape of the body in the twelfth century, cloth needed to be cut into shapes and the shapes became more complex in each century, thus requiring guides or patterns to form appropriate shapes to fit the body. The paper pattern ultimately became that guide; however, as Frieda Sorber observed in the exhibition catalog Patterns from the MoMu in Antwerp, “The history of the paper pattern is almost as elusive as the ephemeral nature of the object itself” (Heaven

The Growth of Chinese Textile and Apparel Industries: Is It Just an Illustration of Modernization?

Jianhua Zhao

Source: The Chinese Fashion Industry. An Ethnographic Approach 2013

Book chapter

The textile and apparel industries are of vital importance to the Chinese economy, even though they are often regarded as “sunset industries” in developed countries such as the United States. These industries provide fabric and clothing to meet the basic needs of a population of 1.3 billion people, employ about 19 million workers,The number is reportedly over one hundred million if those employed in supporting industries, such as the cotton growers, are included. These numbers are estimates by th

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