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Walter Van Beirendonck

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Charles James

Rio Ali

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Véronique Branquinho

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Kosuke Tsumura

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Pam Hogg

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Bella Freud

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Margaret Howell

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Fashion 1970s–2000s

Colleen Hill

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In London, the Victoria and Albert Museum’s 1971 exhibition “Fashion: An Anthology by Cecil Beaton” attracted more than 90,000 visitors, making it one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history. While Beaton acquired examples of historical dress from some of Britain’s most fashionable women, he placed particular emphasis on recent fashion—a largely unprecedented idea. Also important was the exhibition’s experimental installation, created in part by professional store window dressers

Wendy Dagworthy

Michelle Labrague

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Sonia Rykiel

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Sarah Burton

Shonagh Marshall

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Salvador Dalí

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Mystifying, intriguing, thought-provoking: the layered work of the Spanish artist Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) appeared across painting, drawing, film, and sculpture. He is best known for his involvement in the artistic and literary movement of surrealism, which explored the unconscious. However, Dalí’s increasingly commercial endeavors and lifelong interest in dress led him to become hugely influential in fashion, from his meticulously flamboyant self-presentation to his collaborations with couturi

Ronaldus Shamask

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Jean-Charles de Castelbajac

Elizabeth Tregenza

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

1970s Style: Key Themes and Trends

Jo Turney

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The 1970s established fashion as performance, an element of cultures of display in which the street became catwalk (and vice versa), fusing fashion with media such as music, dance, film, and art. It was a decade of imagination and individuality, resulting from newfound social and personal freedoms (Tom Wolfe dubbed it the “Me” decade) which combined with a sartorial knowingness created a new confidence in the presentation of the self—anything was possible and the only limits were of one’s imagina

Evidence about Dress in the United States

Jean L. Druesedow

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress is one of the most informative aspects of our culture. It reveals the personal aesthetic of the wearer in response to specific times, places, and events. Through dress one can often ascertain the age, sex, occupation, socioeconomic status, and religion of the wearer. One can investigate life rituals, family relationships, cross-cultural, and regional attitudes. One of the most persistent problems in dress history is the changing definition of the word costume. It is used by historians and c

Dress and Fashion Exhibits

Jean L. Druesedow

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Examples of secular and ecclesiastical dress have been part of the founding collections of many of the world’s great museums. In the late sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, in private “cabinets of curiosities” that were the forerunners of many museums as institutions, elements of dress were collected in part to represent the curious and strange, in part for the artistry of the textiles and ornamentation. A number of museums have been founded on the basis of private collections, and

Dress and Fashion Museums

Akiko Fukai

Translated by Brian Moeran

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Until the comparatively recent establishment of specialist fashion museums, dress collections—focused primarily on ethnic, religious, or court dress—had existed in general art museums throughout the world, but they had usually been treated as works of art, or as examples of craft and design. In Japan, where these distinctions were not drawn, traditional dress was viewed as art. However, during the nineteenth century in Europe, when art came to be classified into “high” and “low” forms, dress was

Fans

Moira F. Harri

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A handheld fan, made of feathers, leaves, paper, or cloth, with sticks of ivory or wood, is one of the oldest accessories for men and women in the world. There are four basic styles: feather, leaf, folding, and flat. The best-known feather fans use the plumage of the African ostrich. Palm leaves often served as early fans, but any other large leaf could be used. A flat fan is sometimes said to be Chinese in origin. Round in shape, the framed surface could be paper or cloth such as silk or gauze.

Introduction: Dress and Fashion in the Context of the Museum

Amy de la Haye

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Until very recently many collections of dress and fashion were generically described as costume. With reference to fashion (the creative expression of designers that can form a trend) and style (the individual look styled by the wearer of fashionable clothes or to signal subcultural allegiances for instance), the Museum of Costume in Bath has been renamed the Fashion Museum. The collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum, formerly described as dress (which can be used as a verb or as a noun ref

Resources for the Study of European Dress and Fashion in New Zealand

Laura Jocic

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The historical factors of settler life inevitably influenced the reasons why clothing has been saved. Much emphasis was placed on fashionable, quality clothing of women, although there have been other kinds of dress acquired and ideas about collecting have changed substantially in the twenty-first century. Regional factors, the scattered location of museums and collections, their particularities of acquisition, and the limited state of research into the subject are discussed below. Little has bee

Evidence about Dress of Indigenous People: United States Territory

Jenna Tedrick Kuttruff

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

American archaeology focuses, as does archaeology in other parts of the world, on the study of the human past by excavating and analyzing the material remains and monuments of past cultures and the contexts in which they are found. Archaeological findings and interpretations can be combined with information found in historical accounts to enhance the study of dress of North American Indian peoples not only at the times of early European contact but also prehistorically. Archaeology has provided e

Resources: Collections of Colonial Dress and Fashion in Australia

Catherine Reade

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Colonial period in Australia began with the establishment of the penal colony of New South Wales in 1788 and ended with the federation of Australia’s six colonies in 1901. By this time the Australian population reached just over 3.7 million, although immigration and birth rates were in decline. During this period Australia attained many hallmarks of a modern society, including urban and regional centers with good shopping facilities, cultural and educational institutions, clothing manufacture

Evidence about Dress of Indigenous People: Canadian Territory

Michèle Hayeur Smith

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Studying dress archaeologically poses unique challenges. Preservation is a primary concern, as elements of dress involving hair, skin, and most fibers are usually absent. These limitations can be overcome through reference to other sources of dress-related data. Some types of sites are better suited than others for preserving archaeological information relevant to the study of dress. Mortuary sites tend to be more revealing than settlement sites, because elements of dress are frequently disposed

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