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Dai Rees

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Fashion 1970s–2000s

Colleen Hill

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In London, the Victoria and Albert Museum’s 1971 exhibition “Fashion: An Anthology by Cecil Beaton” attracted more than 90,000 visitors, making it one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history. While Beaton acquired examples of historical dress from some of Britain’s most fashionable women, he placed particular emphasis on recent fashion—a largely unprecedented idea. Also important was the exhibition’s experimental installation, created in part by professional store window dressers

Evidence about Dress in Canada

Christina Bates

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress in Canada is a complex topic, encompassed by seventeenth-century New France, the settling of the west in the late nineteenth century, and the growing multicultural cities of the twenty-first century. Canada is a land of immigrants, from the founding nations of France and England, to the waves of European and now Asian immigration. There is the strong influence of England on the Commonwealth nation, and of the United States. The study of dress is spread unevenly across Canada, engaging acade

Body Ornaments of Solomon Islands

Ben Burt

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The country of Solomon Islands was formed in the 1890s by British colonization of a chain of islands in the southwest Pacific region of Melanesia. From west to east these include the major islands of Choiseul, New Georgia, Santa Isabel, Guadalcanal, Malaita, and Makira, with many smaller groups from Shortland Islands in the west to Santa Cruz far to the east. Like other island Melanesians in Papua New Guinea to the west and Vanuatu to the east, Solomon Islanders live by farming, foraging, and fis

Norwegian Folk Dress in the United States

Carol Colburn

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Emigration from Norway to the United States lasted for approximately one hundred years, from 1825 to 1925. Norway’s terrain provided only three percent arable land; for Norwegian immigrants, the fertile plains in America’s Midwest were an attractive destination. Few packed distinctively Norwegian clothing, knowing that following local styles would indicate their intention to blend in. However, Norwegian dress echoed among the Norwegian American population through continued contact between Norway

Dress and Fashion Exhibits

Jean L. Druesedow

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Examples of secular and ecclesiastical dress have been part of the founding collections of many of the world’s great museums. In the late sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, in private “cabinets of curiosities” that were the forerunners of many museums as institutions, elements of dress were collected in part to represent the curious and strange, in part for the artistry of the textiles and ornamentation. A number of museums have been founded on the basis of private collections, and

Historically-Inspired Bridal Wear from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Centuries

Lydia Edwards

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

This article considers the influence of historical styles on bridal wear, a common trend in design from the nineteenth century through to the twenty-first. It considers the extent to which details of historical design have been—and still are—incorporated into wedding dresses and, chiefly, the reasons behind doing so. This will be explored through several examples showing either overt or subtle references to a particular historical timeframe, considering the choice of the bride and the psychology

Dress and Fashion Museums

Akiko Fukai

Translated by Brian Moeran

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Until the comparatively recent establishment of specialist fashion museums, dress collections—focused primarily on ethnic, religious, or court dress—had existed in general art museums throughout the world, but they had usually been treated as works of art, or as examples of craft and design. In Japan, where these distinctions were not drawn, traditional dress was viewed as art. However, during the nineteenth century in Europe, when art came to be classified into “high” and “low” forms, dress was

Fans

Moira F. Harri

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A handheld fan, made of feathers, leaves, paper, or cloth, with sticks of ivory or wood, is one of the oldest accessories for men and women in the world. There are four basic styles: feather, leaf, folding, and flat. The best-known feather fans use the plumage of the African ostrich. Palm leaves often served as early fans, but any other large leaf could be used. A flat fan is sometimes said to be Chinese in origin. Round in shape, the framed surface could be paper or cloth such as silk or gauze.

Introduction: Dress and Fashion in the Context of the Museum

Amy de la Haye

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Until very recently many collections of dress and fashion were generically described as costume. With reference to fashion (the creative expression of designers that can form a trend) and style (the individual look styled by the wearer of fashionable clothes or to signal subcultural allegiances for instance), the Museum of Costume in Bath has been renamed the Fashion Museum. The collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum, formerly described as dress (which can be used as a verb or as a noun ref

Resources for the Study of European Dress and Fashion in New Zealand

Laura Jocic

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The historical factors of settler life inevitably influenced the reasons why clothing has been saved. Much emphasis was placed on fashionable, quality clothing of women, although there have been other kinds of dress acquired and ideas about collecting have changed substantially in the twenty-first century. Regional factors, the scattered location of museums and collections, their particularities of acquisition, and the limited state of research into the subject are discussed below. Little has bee

Perfumed Dress and Textiles

Katia Johansen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Perfumed dress and textiles are standard in every culture, yet virtually none have been preserved. Fragrances were once considered to be the souls of objects and therefore sacred. Incense, used worldwide in religious ceremonies, is often noticeable on vestments. Perfuming was used to mask bad odors, for ceremonies, or simply for appeal. Perfuming methods included using incense, sweet bags, oils, and fuming pans. Perfume is generally made of the volatile oils of plants, grasses, spices, herbs, woo

Historical Evidence: Korea

Seongsil Park

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Chinese neo-Confucianism was adopted by Emperor Taejo (1335–1408), the founder of the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910). Society, including dress, was carefully regulated. Members of the court were classified into nine ranks. Gwanbok, or official dress, included separate wardrobes for court ceremonials, religious rites, and official and ordinary work, and there were rigorous sumptuary laws. In addition to pictorial and written documentation, there are numerous examples of garments and accessories as evi

Resources: Collections of Colonial Dress and Fashion in Australia

Catherine Reade

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Colonial period in Australia began with the establishment of the penal colony of New South Wales in 1788 and ended with the federation of Australia’s six colonies in 1901. By this time the Australian population reached just over 3.7 million, although immigration and birth rates were in decline. During this period Australia attained many hallmarks of a modern society, including urban and regional centers with good shopping facilities, cultural and educational institutions, clothing manufacture

Royal Dress Preserved at the Topkapi Museum

Hülya Tezcan

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Topkapi Palace is home to an opulent collection of 1,550 garments of historical Ottoman apparel. The existence of this collection arises from a palace tradition whereby when a sultan or (male) member of the immediate court died, his clothes were removed for safekeeping and placed in protective wrappers. The collection begins with kaftans belonging to Fatih Sultan Mehmed (Mehmed the Conqueror, 1451–1481), and it ends with garments owned by the last sultan, Mehmet Reşad in the early twentieth c

Museum Collections of Dress and Fashion

Eleanor Thompson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress has achieved a high profile in museums around the world. There are hundreds of collections of varying quantities cared for in museums of fashion, decorative art, history, natural science, and anthropology. They are curated within their own specialist departments or within larger ones of applied arts, ethnography, or social history. Collections of dress are assembled to reveal changes in design, manufacturing processes, and taste. They are used to record social and cultural customs and recon

Spain

Silvia Ventosa

Translated by Lucy Lawton

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The influence of Spanish dress on European fashions is concentrated in two periods: the period of court life of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries with the moda a la española (Spanish-style fashion), and that of the majos, members of the Madrid artistic scene at the end of the eighteenth century and during the nineteenth century. The stereotypical image of the Spanish was fixed around 1800, an image that emanated from the south, from Andalusia, and this stereotype still survives in the early

Introduction to China’s National Minorities

John E. Vollmer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The People’s Republic of China (PRC) identifies itself as a united multiethnic state founded jointly by its minzu, or ethnic groups. To date there are fifty-six minzu recognized by the PRC, all of whose people are Chinese citizens. The PRC recognizes the aboriginal people of Taiwan as a single group named Gaoshan (though there are thirteen recognized tribes within Taiwan). Differences in dress, some diverse and others subtle, help to distinguish these tribes and minorities, and many have a recogn

Book chapter

The first time I encountered Holocaust shoes in a museum setting was in a display of thousands of leather shoes piled in room-sized cages at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. The shoes had been brought there from a former extermination camp in Poland. My impression, although uniquely my own, was remarkably similar to a story in Chicken Soup for the Jewish Soul about the writer’s pilgrimage to the Nazi extermination camps in Poland: (Green-baum 2001, 276–78)When I wal

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Curating the Fashion City: New York Fashion at the V&A

Sonnet Stanfill

Source: Fashion’s World Cities 2006

Book chapter

Important to a chronicle of New York fashion are the couture designs of Charles James. While James is perhaps best remembered for his extravagant eveningwear (his so-called Clover dress of 1953 is composed of thirty pattern pieces and layers of fabric (Martin 1997: 53)), he was also capable of stunning simplicity. The Museum does have examples of James’s elaborate eveningwear but the garment representing him in the gallery is a late 1930s coat, which is the model of restraint (Figure 5.1). The Mu

Revolutionary Relics

Richard Wrigley

Source: The Politics of Appearances. Representations Of Dress In Revolutionary France 2002

Book chapter

In narrating the Revolution, dress figures repeatedly as tangible evidence by means of which to articulate the present’s relation to the past, whether for reasons of celebration and commemoration, or for those of condemnation and denunciation. The preservation of special items of dress as highly charged and cherished souvenirs is a phenomenon that is evident from the earliest days of the Revolution.

Patterns of Choice: Women’s and Children’s Clothing in the Wallis Archive, York Castle Museum

Mary M. Brooks

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

The Wallis family was a financially secure, middle-class Quaker family living in Darlington, County Durham, in northern England. Amy Mounsey married Anthony Wallis, a schools’ inspector, in 1910 and moved to live in Penrith, Cumbria. She had three children: Edward, Henry and Rachel. (Figure 10.1) In the 1930s, Rachel studied music in London and Vienna, while there changing to studying architecture. (Clegg 1998) After her marriage, she moved to Cambridge and, as Rachel Rostas, combined architectur

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