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Importing fashion merchandise

Deanna Clark-Esposito

Source: A Practical Guide to Fashion Law and Compliance, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

importingglobal systemIf you look around the average American household today you will quickly discover that most of the articles there are from other countries. You would find the same result when examining the labels on your wearing apparel and may even realize that 100 percent of your clothes have been imported with much of it from China, as the 2015 dollar value in apparel imports from China alone totaled $30,540,941,000.http://otexa.trade.gov/msrcty/v5700.htm (viewed on August 23, 2016).

Leather and Fur

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Making leather is a highly specialized and time-consuming operation. Because of the time involved, the leather industry must anticipate and predict trends far in advance of other textile suppliers. Leather producers typically decide what production method, textures, finishes, and colors they will use eight to sixteen months before a leather reaches apparel and accessory manufacturers. As a result, those in other fashion industries often look to the leather industry for leadership, particularly in

Project September

Amanda Grace Sikarskie

Source: Bloomsbury Fashion Business Cases

Level: Intermediate

Business case

Project September, a high-end social micromarketing app, allows the fashion savvy customer to model and market the very goods that they themselves have consumed, blurring the lines between consumption and marketing. To a large extent, a brand’s social ethics drives micromarketing on Project September. Brands that fail to embrace the new diversity in the cosmetics and beauty industry will likely fail to gain visibility

Turning Ocean Plastics into Sustainable Product Innovations

Nina Bürklin

Source: Bloomsbury Fashion Business Cases

Level: Intermediate

Business case

The leading sportswear company Adidas and the environmental initiative Parley for the Oceans joined forces in 2014 to tackle the problem of increasing marine pollution caused by plastic waste. The goal of their strategic collaboration was to foster environmental sustainability by raising awareness for the cause and initiating specific activities within their stakeholder network. As part of its corporate social responsibility strategy, Adidas has partnered with the New York-based not-for-profit or

Faux, Faux Fur

Myles Ethan Lascity

Source: Bloomsbury Fashion Business Cases

Level: Introductory

Business case

Fashion’s use of fur has been contentious for decades. Starting in the 1990s, groups such as the Human Society International and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), led a revolution against using real fur in products through their famed “I’d rather go naked than wear fur” campaign. In 1994, Calvin Klein became the first major fashion designer to go fur-free, after PETA occupied the company’s New York City headquarters. More recently, National Geographic noted a rise in fashion use

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