Results: Text (1133) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 1133 (46 pages)
    Page 1 of 46
Charles James

Rio Ali

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Sid Vicious and the Sex Pistols

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The British band Sex Pistols are the quintessential London punk band: they defined British punk better than any other artist did. Although punk rock was heralded as antiestablishment and promoting anarchy, Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood carefully orchestrated the appearance and styling of the Sex Pistols. Sid Vicious joined the band in 1977 to replace Glen Matlock. As guitarist and vocalist, Vicious became a de facto leading man for the band. Along with bandmate Johnny Rotten (John Lydon),

Adam Ant

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In the early 1980s, pop musicians embraced historicism in their performance attire. Adam and the Ants, a new wave band based in London, donned clothing inspired by historic military outfits, nineteenth-century dandies, and pirates. They were among the recognized leaders of the New Romantics movement, a London youth subculture known for its taste for eccentric fashion. The band was formed in 1977 and achieved fame with a streak of successful albums, particularly Kings of the Wild Frontier (1980) a

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Siouxsie Sioux

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The Medusa-like Siouxsie Sioux, who fronted her own band, Siouxsie and the Banshees, is closely identified with 1970s British punk and the post-punk era. Gleefully subverting convention and with an inescapably dark aesthetic, forbidden worlds of sex and fetishism were crossed with theatrical display in a wardrobe that was crowned by the graphic beauty of a pale face with exaggerated kohl eyes, red lips, and savage spikes of dark hair. Fashion has continued to embrace the theme of subversion and m

Elvis Presley

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Elvis Presley’s ascent from impoverished childhood to worldwide fame as a singer and actor in the 1950s allowed him to indulge a love of clothes that began as a teenager. A career of over twenty years established a sharp-dressing persona, graduating into extravagant stage attire in the 1970s. The shock of his early death only served to increase the public’s fascination with him and to immortalize him as a cultural icon. Elvis’s handsome image continues to reassert itself in the early twenty-first

Madonna

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Madonna—singer, actress, entertainer—has maintained a consistently high profile since the early 1980s, when her feisty image and eclectic style choices resonated with a generation of young women. Sexualized, underwear-revealing costumes popularized the trend for underwear-as-outerwear. Her profile has ensured that designers have been thrilled to design for her, disseminating couture values to a wide audience; fashion has in turn absorbed her influence and aspects of her look continue to be regene

Carmen Miranda

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Carmen Miranda was born in Portugal but grew up in Rio de Janeiro and considered herself a Brazilian. Her love of singing led to a career as a musical star in Brazil, going on conquer the US in 1939. Her cheery, colorful persona wiggled through a succession of Hollywood movies in extraordinary costumes that celebrated the color and passion of Brazil and its music, accented with Carmen’s trademark headpieces. Her influence on fashion in her lifetime was strong, with ranges of clothing, jewelry, sh

The Queen

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In 2015, Queen Elizabeth II became Britain’s longest-reigning monarch, having occupied the throne since 1952—over sixty-three years. The royal wardrobe has been of interest to the world since her childhood, and as a young woman, the clothes she wore for royal tours abroad and official visits were very influential. The designs produced for her by British couturiers were copied for the mass market. In the early twenty-first century, the Queen’s immaculate appearance transcends the vagaries of fashi

Islamic Style

Magdalena Crăciun

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Fashion designers have found inspiration in past and present sartorial repertoires. Islamically appropriate forms of covered dress have aesthetically been drawn upon as well. Consequently, headscarves, face veils and head-to-toe outerwear have occasionally appeared on the catwalk. Fashion commentators have pointed out that such creations and assemblages referenced ethic, traditional, historical, exotic or oriental dress, and only rarely labelled their source of inspiration as Islamic style. The n

Ball Gowns

Emma Davenport

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Ball gowns are considered to be the most extravagant category of evening dress. Although balls date back to the Middle Ages, and historically were seen as dance parties to celebrate all manner of occasions, they reemerged as a popular way to introduce eligible women and men into marriageable society during the mid-1800s. Competition for suitors centered on the expense and opulence of a woman’s ball gown. Subsequently, ball gowns have continued to represent ideals of romantic femininity. On the ca

Stephen Sprouse, Fall/Winter 1988

Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Stephen Sprouse was a pioneer in merging street style and high fashion. During his early career at Halston, he was drawn to the downtown New York punk scene. Working with Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Andy Warhol, his fall/winter collection of 1988 had all of the hallmarks of a Sprouse collection, with Day-Glo fabrics, sheath dresses, and bold graffiti prints. It was also Sprouse’s last collection for a decade. Stephen’s career flourished again at the end of his life thanks to his famou

Vivienne Westwood, “On Liberty,” Fall/Winter 1994

Lydia Edwards

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

“My job, more than anything, is to idealize women,” Vivienne Westwood has said of her work, including the fall/winter collection “On Liberty,” which premiered in Paris in 1994. Her appropriation of historic styles is well known, but in this collection a reinvention of the bustle, the nineteenth-century skirt support that accented a woman’s behind and allowed for elaborate skirt drapery, is more fluid than similar iterations have been. Westwood’s stark wire cage from 1990, for instance, was not so

Vivienne Westwood’s Elevated Ghillie Shoes from 1993

Hayley-Jane Edwards-Dujardin

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

For her fall/winter 1993–1994 “Anglomania” collection, Vivienne Westwood perched her models on extremely elevated platform shoes. Inspired, as most of her collection, by Scottish traditional garments, the platform shoes reinterpreted ancestral ghillies worn for folkloric dances. However, apart from the lacing structure, the shoes were more reminiscent of fetish footwear—an aesthetic typical of Vivienne Westwood’s taste for combining conservatism with subversiveness. When the British designer rein

Underwear from the 1970s to 2000

Hayley-Jane Edwards-Dujardin

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

From the twentieth century, underwear has acquired a functional and an aesthetic purpose, sometimes serving as a second skin for comfort and at other times as an exoskeleton, reshaping the body’s natural form. It conceals or audaciously reveals women’s intimacy and thus nourishes erotic fantasies in a flirtatious game of “nice meets naughty.” Underwear originally had a function of protection, hygiene, and support; it embodied the existing social boundaries between the hidden intimacy and the publ

Véronique Branquinho

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Pam Hogg

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Bridal Wear

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The evolution of the bridal gown, and its history, aesthetic, and rituals, are significant within our cultural history and have an influence on the contemporary wedding ceremony. Modern designers continue to be influenced by fashion history, or may reflect current styles and concerns. This article predominantly refers to the white wedding gown worn traditionally in Western Christian cultures, its heritage, and the wedding dress as archival object.

Louise Brooks

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Louise Brooks (1906–1985) was the epitome of the 1920s “flapper,” whose iconic look and style reflected the speed and dynamism of modernity, and whose liberated approach to life and her own identity contributed to her often tragic legacy.

Helen Storey

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Lolita

Kathryn A. Hardy Bernal

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The Lolita fashion-based subculture, once an underground Japanese movement, is a burgeoning worldwide industry. The style, represented by women who dress in childlike clothing, emerged on the streets in the 1970s, gaining impetus within the J-rock (Japanese rock) music scene of the 1990s. The visual kei band Malice Mizer formulated their look on New Romantic glam, inspired by 1980s collaborations between Vivienne Westwood and Malcolm McLaren; fans of the guitarist, Mana, began to mimic his unique

Bill Blass, Spring/Summer 1984

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This collection was all about simplicity, which led Nina Hyde at the Washington Post to comment, “Blass’s clothes have never been more simple, less contrived.” The hems were short because Blass believed that his couture customers had the money to keep their body in great shape. There were bra-like tops under conservative suits for day, and evening gowns in silk charmeuse draped in silk chiffon. Because of the simplicity of the clothes, the models’ hair was more extreme. Critics commended Blass’s

Bill Blass, Spring/Summer 1988

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This collection was inspired by Matisse paintings that Bill Blass saw while at the National Gallery in Washington. Shown at the Parsons School of Design in New York, the clothes were short and full of froufrou due to the influence of “the sugar daddy of bonbon chic” and designer of the moment Christian Lacroix, and his short, little-girl styles. Hems were well above the knees, which concerned retailers servicing working women needing office-appropriate clothes. Even though critics liked his use o

Marc Jacobs

Casey Mackenzie Johnson

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Edie Sedgwick

Stephanie Kramer

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In the canon of fashion tastemakers, Edie Sedgwick remains both a legend and a mystery. In her short twenty-eight years, the Santa Barbara, California native was a socialite, heiress, artist, actress, model, New York scenester, and 1965’s anointed “Girl of the Year.” From her affiliation with Andy Warhol and the artistic community of the Factory to her collaboration with designer Betsey Johnson, to her stints as a model for Vogue, Sedgwick’s contribution to the world of fashion was undoubtedly a

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 1133 (46 pages)
Page 1 of 46