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Bibliographic guide

A number of scholars have helped to develop the field of aesthetics of dress using a multidisciplinary approach. An early literature review was completed by dress scholars DeLong et al. (1974). Marilyn Horn (1975), also a dress scholar, approached the study of clothing as an interdisciplinary topic. Later, DeLong and Ann Marie Fiore (1994), seeking to provide a better understanding of aesthetics of dress, edited a compilation of papers that included a variety of perspectives. Fiore, Patricia Kiml

Aesthetic Dress

Oriole Cullen

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Seven years ago certain ladies delighted to display themselves at public gatherings in what are called aesthetic dresses; in some cases the costumes were pretty enough, in others they seemed to rival each other in ugliness of form and oddity of color (p. 256).

Dress Reform

Patricia A. Cunningham

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Throughout the nineteenth century and in the early decades of the twentieth century, the basic silhouette of women’s dress in the United States went through many changes. Many people accepted this ever-changing succession of fashions as a natural phenomenon, an inevitable outward expression of progress; fashion was a sign of modernity. The changing styles of dress and its silhouette were largely dependent on various undergarments—corsets, petticoats, crinolines, bustles, and other supporting devi

Hippie Style

Joel Lobenthal

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The hippies built on the generic silhouettes that prevailed during the 1960s—the miniskirt, the pantsuit—but they transmogrified Mod fashion at the decade’s midpoint by the way they put their clothes together, by their choices of fabric, and by the way they accessorized. Folkloric motifs, style, and fabrics were ubiquitous in hippie fashion. Their adoption of long peasant skirts helped move fashion back to longer hemlines. The generally loose and unconstructed silhouette of the 1960s became even

Fashion, Dress, and Interior Spaces

Peter McNeil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Clothes are animated by bodies moving in space, and attitudes toward work and leisure that have changed dramatically across culture and time. In early modern Europe until the eighteenth century, sumptuary laws extended well beyond dress to even the type of finish and materials used in interior design. Other societies, including China and Thailand, continuously attempted to control these appearances. In England in the post-Restoration decades, very wealthy women exhibited new independence in the d

African American

Gwendolyn S. O’Neal

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Inarguably, the dress practices of many African Americans differ from those of the dominant culture. African American dress practices are both complex and diverse and are rooted in a cultural aesthetic that can be called neither African nor American. The forced symbiosis of African and American culture produced a group of people the civil rights leader W.E.B. DuBois characterized as having a “double consciousness”—a sense of being neither fully American nor fully African. The competing systems of

Dress and Art: Western

Sandra L. Rosenbaum

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Images of people wearing clothing create an obvious connection between dress and art. Because relatively few examples of historic garments survive, these images document the history of dress. Historically, those sitting for portraits chose their dress to project a specific image; the artist was responsible for conveying messages encoded in dress, meticulously reproducing them. Ann Rosalind Jones and Peter Stallybrass have commented that Renaissance clothes were perceived as material forms of pers

Influence of the Arts

Jo Ann Stabb

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The relationship of art to dress in any part of the world and at any time is complex, as is the case in the United States and Canada. Both art and dress reflect and share not only aesthetic elements but also parallel cultural, social, philosophical, geographical, technological, political, gender, and religious influences of any particular era. This confluence, or zeitgeist, characterizes the spirit of the times and defines the prevailing style. Yet even while sharing the formal visual elements of

Dress Reform

Kristina Stankovski

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

During the years following the English Civil War of 1642, various influential clothing-reform movements flourished. One of the nonconformist groups that emerged during this time was the Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers. The group’s founder, George Fox, established a set of social practices that were based on Christian ideologies and utopianism. The main thesis proposed by Fox was simplicity of appearance and lifestyle. His favor of spirituality over what he considered to be

Fashion Reform: Aesthetic Movement in Dress and Interiors

Marilyn Casto

Source: Fashion in Fiction. Text and Clothing in Literature, Film, and Television 2009

Book chapter

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