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Bibliographic guide

Sources employed for the study of dress history include documents, visual representations, and material artifacts. Documents include all manner of written records such as wills, inventories, wardrobe accounts, bills of sale, advice on dressing, as well as eyewitness accounts of how people dressed in the past. An early example would be the Roman historian Tacitus, who described the dress of the inhabitants of central Europe in Germania in 98 C.E. The visual record includes paintings, drawings, eng

Art and Dress

Peter McNeil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Academic art and popular dress emerge from different structural and intellectual systems. Nonetheless, fashion in the early twenty-first century often appears to be like art and art to be like fashion. Artists are viewed as the ideal collaborators with fashion designers and the fashion industry, injecting the type of cultural capital they embody into products that have become synonymous with innovation and novelty. Artists throughout the twentieth century intervened in fashion culture, their anti

Art Patronage as a Generator of Cloth and Dress

Judith Perani and Norma H. Wolff

Source: Cloth, Dress and Art Patronage in Africa 1999

Book chapter

Cloth, as a valued cultural artifact, is involved in every aspect of African life, playing an essential role in marriage, political and ritual exchanges. (see Chapter 2) As dress, cloth reaches its most culturally meaningful form. A clothed body is essential to complete human identity, setting apart the cultural self from the unclothed ‘natural’ body. Depending upon cultural precepts, minimal dress in some societies may make the body very visible, while in others the body is fully concealed and p

Art Patron Roles

Judith Perani and Norma H. Wolff

Source: Cloth, Dress and Art Patronage in Africa 1999

Book chapter

Two broad categories of art patrons can be distinguished on the basis of the bond between art patron and artist: commissioning patrons and consumer patrons.The concepts of ‘commissioning patron’ and ‘consumer patron’ were first articulated in a 1978 ASA panel co-sponsored by the authors on Art Patronage in Africa and expanded upon in essays by the authors in The Dictionary of Art (Perani and Wolff 1996a, 1996b). A commissioning patron enters the artistic process during the preproduction period. P

Leadership Arts in State Societies

Judith Perani and Norma H. Wolff

Source: Cloth, Dress and Art Patronage in Africa 1999

Book chapter

In both Muslim and non-Muslim West African states, secular and spiritual power interface in the personage of the king. Often, secular power is strengthened by spiritual power. In the indigenous non-Muslim West African kingdoms of Asante, Yoruba, Benin and Fon the office of divine ruler was spiritually sanctioned, and leadership regalia was imbued with sacred power. Among the Fon in the Republic of Benin, special symbols associated with the reigns of different kings had a sacred dimension. Fon div

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