Results: Text (14) Images (0)

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 14 of 14 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Introduction

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

And now the art world has become so big and stars seem to come and go as swiftly as reality television characters in Hollywood …

What is Fashionable Art?

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

the erosion of the older distinction between high culture and so-called mass or popular culture. This is perhaps the most distressing development of all from the academic standpoint, which has traditionally had a vested interest in preserving a realm of high, or elite culture against the surrounding environment of philistinism, of schlock, and kitschkitsch, of TV series and Reader’s DigestReader’s Digest culture, and in transmitting difficult and complex skills of reading, listening and seeing to

The Artist as Impresario, the Artist as Brand: from Baudelaire to Barney

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

So much of the world is advertising, and because of that, individuals feel they have to present themselves as a package.

Less is Less: Formlessness

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

formlessnessWell, concerning civility or public morality, you can now see what’s happening in art. For any art exhibition in London, for example, to be effective, it must be something disgusting: show some dead fish or the excrement of cows. At one exhibition, my god, they showed a video of a colonoscopy. Today, more and more, the cultural-economic apparatus itself has to incite stronger and more shocking effects and products. These are the recent trends in the arts. But the thing is that transgr

Minimalism: Donald Judd Or Ikea?

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Minimalist artists constructed simple, monochromatic, geometric objects of formal symmetry, characterized by an absence of traditional composition. Minimalism was an extreme abstract art, not imitative but solipsistic, self-referential: it was unto itself, harking back to the idea of truth to materials whose lineage can be located in the Russian Constructivists (particularly Rodchenko, AleksandrRodchenko and El Lissitzky) through to Moore, HenryMoore, Hepworth, BarbaraHepworth, Gabo, NoamGabo, Pe

Conclusion: Fashionable Art

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The Twenties, Thirties, and World War II 1920–1947

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

With the end of World War I, Europe and the United States hoped for a return to normalcy. U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, a strong proponent of the League of Nations, campaigned arduously for ratification of the Treaty of Versailles and membership for the United States in the League. These efforts cost him his health—he suffered a breakdown in 1919—and he was an invalid for the remainder of his 17 months in office. In the end, the Senate defeated the treaty, and the United States never joined the

The Twenties, Thirties, and World War II, 1920–1947

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Science, Color, and Art

James Thomas Long

Source: The New Munsell Student Color Set, 4th Edition, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

It is important to understand that all the major advancements in color usage have been spearheaded by discoveries and developments in science, and not by legend, myth, and spirituality. This chapter provides an introduction to the major scientific developments that changed how artists and designers used and use color.

Russian Constructivism in Dress and Textiles

Djurdja Bartlett

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Constructivism was embedded in immense political and social changes brought about by the Bolshevik Revolution. Its appearance in 1919 resulted from the merger of two parallel but very different artistic movements: futurism and proletkult. While futurism rebelled against bourgeois culture and lifestyle in a series of anarchistic practices, proletkult was a politically motivated mass movement that promoted a separate culture for the proletariat. In this context, for the constructivists, fashion was

Dress and Fashion Museums

Akiko Fukai

Translated by Brian Moeran

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Until the comparatively recent establishment of specialist fashion museums, dress collections—focused primarily on ethnic, religious, or court dress—had existed in general art museums throughout the world, but they had usually been treated as works of art, or as examples of craft and design. In Japan, where these distinctions were not drawn, traditional dress was viewed as art. However, during the nineteenth century in Europe, when art came to be classified into “high” and “low” forms, dress was

Art and Dress

Peter McNeil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Academic art and popular dress emerge from different structural and intellectual systems. Nonetheless, fashion in the early twenty-first century often appears to be like art and art to be like fashion. Artists are viewed as the ideal collaborators with fashion designers and the fashion industry, injecting the type of cultural capital they embody into products that have become synonymous with innovation and novelty. Artists throughout the twentieth century intervened in fashion culture, their anti

Fashion, Dress, and Interior Spaces

Peter McNeil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Clothes are animated by bodies moving in space, and attitudes toward work and leisure that have changed dramatically across culture and time. In early modern Europe until the eighteenth century, sumptuary laws extended well beyond dress to even the type of finish and materials used in interior design. Other societies, including China and Thailand, continuously attempted to control these appearances. In England in the post-Restoration decades, very wealthy women exhibited new independence in the d

The Evolution of the Fashion Image

Jemi Armstrong, Lorrie Ivas and Wynn Armstrong

Source: From Pencil to Pen Tool. Understanding and Creating the Digital Fashion Image, 2006, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This introductory chapter covers the ebb and flow of fashion illustration as the dominant communication tool in advertising throughout the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This tool has changed dramatically at the end of the twentieth century, impacting the industry and the way fashion is presented. Today fashion illustrators and designers work in the digital arena where computers are used as standard artistic

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 14 of 14 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1