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Bibliographic guide

The word “media” is the plural form of “medium,” from the Latin, meaning “middle” or “middle layer.” Thus, a medium is much like a middleman, a conduit that serves to “lead” or “bring together.” In fashion, each medium functions to hold and deliver information: visual, textual, cultural.

Bibliographic guide

Dress, along with cloth, textiles, and adornment, has been an important part of the study of material culture in anthropology since the early times of the discipline, when the focus was on cross-cultural variation and the relationships between different parts of culture and their changes. Some earlier studies aimed specifically to record the significance of material culture in the face of change in a manner that sometimes has been described as “salvage anthropology.” A later generation of anthrop

Covering Up on the Prairies: Perceptions of Muslim Identity, Multiculturalism and Security in Canada

A. Brenda Anderson and F. Volker Greifenhagen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The Canadian mediaOur analysis is restricted to the English-language media and does not include French Canadian publications. tend to portray headcovering as a practice that is forced on women; one can never assume that it is the women’s free choice.For example, ‘The majority of women wearing face coverings are not doing so because of free will; they are doing so because some Neanderthal husband or cleric has told them it is necessary’ (Martinuk 2011; see also Bramham 2010; Kay 2010). According t

‘I Love My Prophet’: Religious Taste, Consumption and Distinction in Berlin

Synnøve Bendixsen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The majority of mosque associations and prayer rooms in Berlin were established by the so-called first-generation migrants who arrived as guest workers in Germany in the late 1960s and early 1970s. These religious organizations and places are mostly divided along ethno-national lines in terms of their participants, language of instruction and religious references. In contrast, the religious youth organization MJD was established in 1994 by eight young Muslims with various ethnic and national back

Miss Headscarf: Islamic Fashion and the Danish Media

Connie Carøe Christiansen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Whilst cultural commentators tended to downplay the aesthetic potential of the headscarf, contestants were generally more sensitive to its potential both as an item of fashion and self-cultivation. They were also conscious of the need to challenge perceptions of Muslim women through their appearance. In several of the Danish newspaper articles which featured the contest, young Muslim women in Denmark were given the opportunity to speak and to present another angle on the headscarf to that usually

Closet Tales from a Turkish Cultural Center in the ‘Petro Metro’, Houston, Texas

Maria Curtis

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The Turquoise Center, or the Turkish Cultural Center as it is commonly called, consists of the Raindrop Turkish House and the Istanbul Conference Center (Figure 7.2). It reaches out to Turkish Americans, American converts and anyone interested in learning about Turkey. Raindrop Turkish House estimates Turks constitute 6,000 of Houston’s 250,000 Muslims. Whereas some of them came decades ago and have lived mainly secular lifestyles, younger practising women have often come to Houston with a well-d

Perspectives on Muslim Dress in Poland: A Tatar View

Katarzyna Górak-Sosnowska and Michał Łyszczarz

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Numbering around 3,000–5,000 people, Tatars constitute one of the smallest ethnic groups in Poland. Centuries of living in a mainstream Polish and Catholic society and being isolated from any other Tatar or Muslim population resulted in their losing a lot of their cultural heritage. However, it was not so much the pressure from the outside world as the willingness of Tatars to integrate, or even assimilate, that has informed Tatar clothing choices. Historically, soon after reaching Lithuania and

Hijab on the Shop Floor: Muslims in Fashion Retail in Britain

Reina Lewis

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

UK employment law has shifted in recent years from equal opportunities legislation which outlawed discrimination on the grounds of race and ethnicity to new policies concerned more broadly with diversity. In 2003, the UK Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations brought the United Kingdom in line with the European Employment Equality Directive of 2000, extending legal protection to cover discrimination ‘on the grounds of perceived as well as actual religion or belief’.

Burqinis, Bikinis and Bodies: Encounters in Public Pools in Italy and Sweden

Pia Karlsson Minganti

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The burqini is often met with resistance. Muslim women are considered to cover themselves too much. Their habits differ from ours, whether in Sweden and Italy or elsewhere in Europe. One day I experienced how this taken-for-granted assumption on European homogeneity is challenged. During a stay in Italy, I had decided to go swimming at a public swimming bath. While in the shower, washing myself before going into the pool, I noticed an information panel on the wall. It stated the regulations, incl

Fashion and Its Discontents: The Aesthetics of Covering in the Netherlands

Annelies Moors

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

A convenient starting point to discuss the fashion-Islam nexus is the eight-page article ‘Hip with the Headscarf’. Appearing in 1999 in the weekend magazine of an upscale Dutch daily, Volkskrant Magazine, this article started with the observation that ‘more and more women with headscarves wear fashionable styles of dress and lots of make-up’ (Jungschleger and Riemersma 1999). Next to portraying a number of young women wearing such fashionable styles, it also presented the points of view of ‘expe

Mediating Islamic Looks

Degla Salim

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The field of fashion is an industry of images (McRobbie 1998: 172). Imagery dominates the industry to such a degree that the distinction between what is really being sold, the garment or the image of the garment, has become increasingly blurry (cf. Baudrillard 1975).The image of the garment is here referred to in a double sense. Image is meant to be regarded as both a consumable photograph of the clothes and as a social ‘image’, an aura that the garment carries. When it comes to understanding the

The Clothing Dilemmas of Transylvanian Muslim Converts

Daniela Stoica

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The Transylvanian city of Cluj-Napoca has lost much of the visual uniformity that dominated it during the socialist and immediate post-socialist periods. With elegant or bohemian cafeterias, stylish dining rooms and clubs, it has become a setting that stands in sharp contrast to the uniform socialist neighbourhoods created under communism. At the beginning of the summer, when the Transylvania International Film Festival animates the city with a young and diverse public, and at the beginning of au

Landscapes of Attraction and Rejection: South Asian Aestheticsin Islamic Fashion in London

Emma Tarlo

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The most obvious feature of dress is its proximity to the body and the intimacy of our relationship to it. Whilst sociologists of the wardrobe rightly remind us that some clothing remains forever unworn or may be kept only for special occasions, it is nonetheless true that it is through being worn that dress springs into life and attains its primary purpose. This intimate relationship between our bodies and our clothes is not, however, without potential conflict. Bodies animate clothes, but they

‘Fashion Is the Biggest Oxymoron in My Life’: Fashion Blogger, Designer and Cover Girl Zinah Nur Sharif in Conversation with Emma Tarlo

Emma Tarlo and Annelies Moors (eds)

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Edited version of an interview conducted over email by Emma Tarlo in October 2012.

Introduction

Jianhua Zhao

Source: The Chinese Fashion Industry. An Ethnographic Approach 2013

Book chapter

On a sultry summer day in Beijing in 2002, I was riding a taxi to a department store near Wangfujing. The store sold traditional Chinesestyle clothing, in which I was interested as part of my research on Chinese clothing styles. Suddenly, the taxi driver, a man in his forties, started yelling, “Ji (hooker)! Ji! [That] must be a ji.” Guided by his angry finger, I saw a tall slender young Chinese woman wearing a glaringly red backless silk halter-top secured with only two strings in the back, march

For the Sake of Art or for the Market? The Cultural Economy of Fashion Design

Jianhua Zhao

Source: The Chinese Fashion Industry. An Ethnographic Approach 2013

Book chapter

Being good in business is the most fascinating kind of art. Making money is art and working is art and good business is the best art.

Made in France: Islamic Fashion Companies on Display

Leila Karin Österlind

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The fashion retailing company Amal-mode has two shops in the outskirts of Paris.The two shops are situated in Saint-Denis and Sarcelles. In the bazaar, it had chosen to separate its goods into three categories, each with their own stand. At one of these stands, only festive dress was sold. Items of more modest dress such as jilbabs, abayas, Jilbabs and abayas are both full-length outer garments, somewhat similar to kaftans.khimarsLong, modest headscarf model that covers the shoulders and sometime

Introduction, Rationale, Context

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Fashion is the medicament that will console for the phenomenon of forgetting on a collective scale.

Artists, Celebrity and Fashion: From Wilde and Warhol to Taylor-Wood

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

An installation at the Venice Biennale of 2009 set out to provide a picture of, or commentary on, the contemporary art world. But it proved, in retrospect, as problematic as trying to portray or parody fashion on film. The Dutch and Nordic pavilions were twinned that year, to display linked installations created by Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset, two artists whose installation ‘The Collectors’ was intended, presumably, to illuminate the activity of that species. The Dutch Pavilion was created

Designers and Models Become Brands

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

In 1921, Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel launched one of the most successful scents of all time (Groom 1997: 21). The iconic oblong bottle for Chanel No. 5, still revered, was carefully designed to her own very strict specifications, and she selected its contents from several versions created by parfumier Ernest Béaux (Charles-Roux 2009). Meanwhile, once established as a designer, she herself also became a fashion leader; she was constantly photographed and always mindful of publicity, whether it was in

Celebrity and Fashion, Past and Present

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

‘Celebrity culture’ in a recognizably modern but still rudimentary form could be said to have emerged in the late eighteenth century. The period witnessed the new scientific discoveries and consequent technological developments associated with the Industrial Revolution. They would transform Western society from a predominantly rural one into one increasingly centred on urban and industrial life. Some of the new technologies also made possible the wide circulation of printed material—newspapers, b

Film Stars as Fashion Icons

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Cinema’s new ‘celebrity’ stardom, within a Western context, is qualitatively different from previous forms of fandom or star emulation. In consequence, the existing theories of stardom (Stacey 1994; Gledhill 1991), sometimes co-opted from film studies to explain modern celebrity culture, are not really sufficient, although, as this book will suggest, Richard Dyer’s idea of ‘the ordinary’ has a new relevance in this rather different context (1978/1998). Film studies within the academy must somehow

Changes in Cinematic Culture: Some Celebrity Cover Girls

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Some of the films made by the new celebrity stars may not actually be seen by their fans; they will, however, have seen stills in magazines or on the Internet. When their films are commercially successful, the image of the star seen on screen often matches their most popular off-screen image. Jennifer Aniston in Marley and Me, made in 2009 and more successful at the box office than her previous string of romantic comedies, looks exactly like the off-screen Jennifer Aniston, so often photographed

‘Fashion Films’: From Prêt-à-Porter to A Single Man

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

–Hugo Grumbar, head of Icon Distribution in the United Kingdom (Clark 2010: 9)Tom Ford has a huge loyal following. Any Vogue reader, GQ, Elle, Vanity Fair … they all know who he is, and there’s always hot anticipation for the next thing he does. I thought he was very marketable.

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