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Isaac Mizrahi

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Donna Summer

Amanda M. B. Pajak

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Donna Summer (1948–2012), born LaDonna Adrian Gaines of Boston, Massachusetts, was titled the “Queen of Disco” during her lifetime and beyond. Predominantly active as a singer-performer during the disco era of the mid- to late 1970s, Summer’s vocal talent and performance aesthetic defined an era of music in addition to an evolution of fashion tied to the hedonistic nightlife of New York City and Los Angeles that was synonymous with the excess and extravagance of the decade. During live performanc

Dancewear on the Catwalk, 1970s–2000s

Katerina Pantelides

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This article describes the influence of dance practice and performance clothing on fashion ca.1970–2005. It begins with an exploration of historic correspondences between fashion and dance, and then considers how the so-called “dance boom” in 1970s New York, which flooded both the City and fashion editorial pages with professional and amateur dancers, inspired fashion designers, photographers, and stylists to blur the boundaries between dance practice wear and quotidian dress. The article also de

For reasons concerning the politics of power governing the site I had chosen to do my fieldwork on, I was told by the party’s manager that I should not talk to the dancers at the events. If I wanted to do my research there I should carry it out in a discreet and silent way. Not daring to question this, I went to the top of the stand facing the dance floor and started to watch the festivities from there. My project of considering the objects through their materiality and agency had to be postponed

Overview of Mongolia

Monisha Ahmed

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Walking down the main street in Ulan Bator, Mongolia’s capital, past gray, crumbling Soviet-era buildings, a woman wearing a blue silk del, or robe, contrasts with the robust man by her side in a sober, gray Western-style suit. Walking alongside them are women in skinny jeans, fitted T-shirts, and stiletto heels. But far from the city, a nomad wears his sheepskin robe, sitting astride his horse. Mongolia has many faces. Probably the most celebrated of these is Chinggis Khaan, better known by his

Dress of the Cook Islands

Kalissa Alexeyeff

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Cook Islands dress of the twenty-first century is a vibrant mixture of local, Western, and regional influences. Traces of the islands’ missionary and colonial history are also evident and reflect an ongoing incorporation of external styles and aesthetics. Since the Cook Islands gained independence in 1965, the revival of local dress practices of the past has been viewed as an important way of forging an independent nation-state. Traditional dress, primarily worn in performance contexts in the ear

Dress in Kiribati

Petra M. Autio

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Republic of Kiribati is a central Pacific state, which consists of thirty-three tiny atolls and reef islands scattered over a vast ocean area corresponding to one-third the size of the United States. It includes three island groups—the Gilbert, Phoenix, and Line Islands—and the island of Banaba. Apart from the Banabans, who have their own, though related, history, the Gilbert Islands chain straddling the equator is where people originally settled, and where the majority (90%) of the populatio

Performance Dress in Japan

Monica Bethe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In early-twenty-first-century Japan, theater and dance performances range from the avant-garde to traditional performing arts that trace their beginnings to periods spanning over a thousand years. The costumes worn for these traditional performances reflect styles of dress prevalent at various historical periods, though not necessarily the period corresponding to the inception of the art in question. The story of performance costume must therefore be seen against the background of the history of

Costume Designer

Whitney Blausen

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

An article in the New Idea Women’s Magazine says that by 1906 theatrical costume design firms flourished in most major cities. Some, like Eaves or Van Horn’s, in New York and Philadelphia respectively, began as manufacturers of uniforms or regalia and expanded into the theatrical market. By contrast, Mrs. Caroline Siedle and Mrs. Castel-Bert, both in New York, established their ateliers specifically to cater to the growing theater industry.

Festivals Pacific-Style

Susan Cochrane

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Examples of ceremonial dress can be found around the world. In the Pacific, festivals as ceremonies celebrate Pacific life and occur in local, regional, national, and international contexts. At the community level, every school has its culture day, every church its fete, and every family and clan celebrates events in the life cycle. On the regional level, provincial governments organize festivals or “shows” to bring the communities under their jurisdiction together to celebrate unity and diversit

Masquerade, Theater, Dance Costumes

Herbert M. Cole

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

African masquerades, perhaps the continent’s premier art form, play grandly with illusion, ambivalence, and paradox. Masks and masquerades are both more, and less, than what they appear to be. Their illusionist play can be comic and lighthearted, or deeply serious, but always it is creative and imaginative, art and artifice. Never is it ordinary, and usually it is deeply meaningful and sometimes powerfully instrumental. Masquerades both create and help organize values and knowledge, and they are

Dance Costumes

Margaret A. Deppe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The category of dance costume is a specialized type of dress usually reserved for performances and masquerade. In North Africa as elsewhere, dance costumes are worn for performances at special events and in entertainment venues. Three general categories of dance in North Africa are raks shaabi (popular dance), raks beledi (country dance), and raks sharqi (eastern dance).

Torres Strait Islander Dress, Australia

Anna Edmundson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Torres Strait is a narrow underwater shelf connecting the northernmost tip of mainland Australia to the Gulf of Papua New Guinea. Torres Strait Islanders are the indigenous people of the region, which forms part of the Australian state of Queensland. The term ailan kastom (island custom) is used to denote those products and practices that are unique to the Torres Strait Islands, including dress.

Dress as Costume in the Theater and Performing Arts

Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In costume, individuals become characters of plays. Dressing for the performing arts works the same way. The performing arts include theater, dance, opera, films, television, and the circus. Costumes are made up of supplements to the body such as gowns and wigs, also including body modifications like makeup. Stylized Japanese Noh masks completely transform actors and constitute artwork in themselves. Throughout most of the history of theater, actors had to supply their own makeup and costumes, bu

Austria

Irene Guenther

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Austria’s capital, Vienna, has been a political and cultural center, from which came a number of distinctive dress styles that influenced the rest of Europe. Among these are the dance dress for the waltz craze of the 1840s, as well as straw bonnets, which originated as peasant dress but were adopted as middle-class fashion, as was also the dirndl, which is the regional folk dress. As Austria was one of the great powers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Austrian dress has also been

Figure Skating Dress and Costume

Moira F. Harris

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The earliest dress for an ice-skater was basic winter-weather gear. Coats or jackets, pants or skirts, mittens or gloves, and hats or scarves protected skaters from the cold and damp. Early paintings and prints give evidence of these choices. In the nineteenth century concerns for health and fitness led to an interest in outdoor recreation. In many cities clubs were formed, and outdoor rinks were planned and built in parks. Clothing intended for skaters’ use was increasingly available. Competitio

Sonja Henie

Moira F. Harris

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

See alsoFigure Skating Dress and Costume.

Ballet Costume

Thomas Hecht

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The origins of ballet lie in the court spectacles of the Renaissance in France and Italy, and evidence of costumes specifically for ballet can be dated to the early fifteenth century. Illustrations from this period show the importance of masks and clothing for spectacles. Splendor at court was strongly reflected in luxuriously designed ballet costumes. Cotton and silk were mixed with flax woven into semitransparent gauze.

Dance and Fashion

Thomas Hecht

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The nineteenth century was dedicated to the waltz, which had developed as a bourgeois activity in Europe and America. In May I Have the Pleasure?, Belinda Quirey argues that in the wake of political, romantic, and industrial revolutions, the waltz was a completely new dance form that perfectly suited the new conditions of modern life—socially, psychologically, and materially. These nineteenth-century developments in dance were reflected in elaborate dance costumes for lower-and middle-class women

Dance Costume

Thomas Hecht

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

From the fifteenth to the eighteenth century, festivities at European courts required highly elaborate dance costumes. The style of court dance costumes tended to be similar to everyday dress of the period, incorporating, for example, laced corsets, puffed and slashed sleeves, farthingales with skirts and applied decoration. In the early twenty-first century, the reproduction of historical dance costumes was evident in the activities of historical dance organizations, such as the Institute for Hi

Explore
Ball Dress

Jane E. Hegland

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Balls have existed for centuries among royalty and the social elite, dating back to the Middle Ages. During the mid-1800s, the ball re-emerged as a desirable manner of entertainment among the upper and middle classes. Through the 1800s, the ball served as a means to bring together people of similar social backgrounds, often for purposes of introducing young women and men of marriageable age. Coming-out balls, debutante balls, or cotillion balls became standard events by the mid-1800s, and have co

Central African Republic

Michelle Kisliuk and Justin Serge Mongosso

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

As the name indicates, the Central African Republic, or Centrafrique, is situated at the west-central heart of the continent. Centrafrique proclaimed independence from the French in 1960. The goal of Barthelemy Boganda, the country’s founder and first president-elect, was to raise the quality of life, which had deteriorated under colonial oppression. Boganda’s vision for his government was to help support the population in five fundamental ways: “to dress, to house, to feed, to educate, and to he

Textiles and Dress of the Motu Koita People

Jacquelyn A. Lewis-Harris

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Papua New Guinea, the eastern half of the island New Guinea (the second-largest island in the world), lies just north of Australia and has several hundred outer islands. Annexed and subdivided by the Germans and British in 1884, Papua New Guinea became an independent nation in 1975. The country has a vast variety of cultures and at least eight hundred languages. The Motu and Koita people inhabited the southern coastal and immediate inland areas of Papua New Guinea, living between the western coas

Competitive Ballroom Dance

Jonathan S. Marion

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Competitive ballroom costuming facilitates and maximizes the artistic and expressive impact of competitors’ dancing. It is meant to accentuate the movements of dancers’ performances and enhance the artistic images being produced. Artistic costume on the one hand, ballroom dress serves simultaneously as functional athletic wear that must stand up to the physical rigors and stresses involved in the tremendous movement and motion competitors produce. Balancing art and athletics, and in line with spe

Ballroom Practice Dress

Jonathan S. Marion

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Competitive costuming is designed and constructed to enhance the visual impact produced by ballroom competitors’ dancing. The rhinestones, feathers, lace, ruching, fabrics, accessories, and all-around tailoring that make a great competition outfit, however, come at a price in cost, weight, and durability. As a result, dancers do not wear their expensive and elaborate costumes throughout the hundreds and thousands of hours they train and rehearse. At the same time, however, they cannot invest all

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