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Sid Vicious and the Sex Pistols

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The British band Sex Pistols are the quintessential London punk band: they defined British punk better than any other artist did. Although punk rock was heralded as antiestablishment and promoting anarchy, Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood carefully orchestrated the appearance and styling of the Sex Pistols. Sid Vicious joined the band in 1977 to replace Glen Matlock. As guitarist and vocalist, Vicious became a de facto leading man for the band. Along with bandmate Johnny Rotten (John Lydon),

Louise Brooks

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Louise Brooks (1906–1985) was the epitome of the 1920s “flapper,” whose iconic look and style reflected the speed and dynamism of modernity, and whose liberated approach to life and her own identity contributed to her often tragic legacy.

Princess Diana

Julia Petrov

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Nicknamed the “people’s princess,” Diana Spencer, Princess of Wales, became a much imitated fashion icon during her short life. Her hairstyles, jewelry, and clothing were coveted by women around the world in the 1980s and 1990s; her image is still popularly reproduced in magazines at every anniversary of her death and in association with events in the lives of her two sons, princes William and Harry. While her fashions no longer look as on trend as they once looked, fans continue to flock to see

Suzanne Lenglen

Jaclyn Pyper

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Suzanne Lenglen was a French tennis player and one of the first female celebrity athletes. Born in Paris in 1899, Suzanne developed her skills on the tennis courts of the French Riviera. Soon after her first win at Wimbledon in 1919, she began to be dressed both on and off the court by the up-and-coming couturier Jean Patou. Suzanne would dominate the international women’s tennis circuit in the 1920s, but her celebrity was equally built on her glamorous lifestyle, clothing, and temperamental pers

Introduction, Rationale, Context

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Fashion is the medicament that will console for the phenomenon of forgetting on a collective scale.

Artists, Celebrity and Fashion: From Wilde and Warhol to Taylor-Wood

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

An installation at the Venice Biennale of 2009 set out to provide a picture of, or commentary on, the contemporary art world. But it proved, in retrospect, as problematic as trying to portray or parody fashion on film. The Dutch and Nordic pavilions were twinned that year, to display linked installations created by Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset, two artists whose installation ‘The Collectors’ was intended, presumably, to illuminate the activity of that species. The Dutch Pavilion was created

Designers and Models Become Brands

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

In 1921, Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel launched one of the most successful scents of all time (Groom 1997: 21). The iconic oblong bottle for Chanel No. 5, still revered, was carefully designed to her own very strict specifications, and she selected its contents from several versions created by parfumier Ernest Béaux (Charles-Roux 2009). Meanwhile, once established as a designer, she herself also became a fashion leader; she was constantly photographed and always mindful of publicity, whether it was in

Celebrity and Fashion, Past and Present

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

‘Celebrity culture’ in a recognizably modern but still rudimentary form could be said to have emerged in the late eighteenth century. The period witnessed the new scientific discoveries and consequent technological developments associated with the Industrial Revolution. They would transform Western society from a predominantly rural one into one increasingly centred on urban and industrial life. Some of the new technologies also made possible the wide circulation of printed material—newspapers, b

Film Stars as Fashion Icons

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Cinema’s new ‘celebrity’ stardom, within a Western context, is qualitatively different from previous forms of fandom or star emulation. In consequence, the existing theories of stardom (Stacey 1994; Gledhill 1991), sometimes co-opted from film studies to explain modern celebrity culture, are not really sufficient, although, as this book will suggest, Richard Dyer’s idea of ‘the ordinary’ has a new relevance in this rather different context (1978/1998). Film studies within the academy must somehow

Changes in Cinematic Culture: Some Celebrity Cover Girls

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Some of the films made by the new celebrity stars may not actually be seen by their fans; they will, however, have seen stills in magazines or on the Internet. When their films are commercially successful, the image of the star seen on screen often matches their most popular off-screen image. Jennifer Aniston in Marley and Me, made in 2009 and more successful at the box office than her previous string of romantic comedies, looks exactly like the off-screen Jennifer Aniston, so often photographed

‘Fashion Films’: From Prêt-à-Porter to A Single Man

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

–Hugo Grumbar, head of Icon Distribution in the United Kingdom (Clark 2010: 9)Tom Ford has a huge loyal following. Any Vogue reader, GQ, Elle, Vanity Fair … they all know who he is, and there’s always hot anticipation for the next thing he does. I thought he was very marketable.

The Changing Face(s) of the Fashion Magazine and the New Media Landscape

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Magazines directed at women alone first appeared in the eighteenth century: the purveying of information about the latest fashions was part of their remit, but they had other tasks to perform. The earliest magazines on both sides of the Atlantic were serious publications, often with an educational element (Ferguson 1983; Gough-Yates 2003). Nevertheless, they always contained line drawings and perhaps coloured plates of the latest fashions from Paris. The idea that the function of the magazine inc

Contemporary Television: So Many Celebrities, So Little Fashion?

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Reality television is very much to the fore within the new discipline of celebrity studies, partly because it has stripped the word celebrity of its original meaning. There are the shows that create celebrities from those who were formerly unknown: there are now other, very popular shows which deploy these same figures in a different capacity: Dancing with the Stars/Strictly Come Dancing; Celebrity Duets; I’m a Celebrity—Get Me Out of Here! Shows in this mini-genre use the new reality celebrities

Music and Fashion Forge Links

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Janice Miller’s recent book Music and Fashion (2011) is a fascinating and long-overdue study of the relationship outlined in the title. What is interesting is that no one had formerly set out to explore the subject in depth, apart from the odd article here and there (see Miller 2011; McLaughlin 2000, 2011) and Stan Hawkins, who focuses in his book upon masculinity and the British pop dandy (2009). Not all of the musicians Miller discusses in her text could be called celebrities; in fact, many of

Caribbean Islanders

José F. Blanco

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Caribbean immigrants have contributed greatly to the multicultural and multilingual diversity of the United States and Canada for a number of years. Often grouped either with other Hispanics or with African Americans, Caribbean people are actually part of a complex mosaic of cultures, languages, and dress practices. The Caribbean, named after its main pre-Columbian inhabitants, the Carib, has been shaped by the encounter of several cultures, including native groups such as the Puerto Rican Taínos

Visual Media and Dress

Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Gibson Church

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual media have played an enormous role in the development of fashion in West Europe. Fashion imagery emerged within print journalism, more specifically women’s magazines, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The development of popular cinema in the first half of the twentieth century had a momentous impact on the global fashion industry, especially in the star system, the “tie-in,” and the involvement of both couturiers and ready-to-wear designers in film. From the radical changes of th

Television

Patricia A. Cunningham

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In 1948, when Wayne Cox of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) pronounced that television is here to stay, he could not have predicted the real impact this new force unleashed. Writing in 1964, Marshall McLuhan had a better grasp of the situation, claiming that television had potential to transform the world into a “global village.” Television is a powerful tool that gains its power through its ability to express ideas through sight and sound. Fashion and television began a symbiotic rela

Eyewear

M. Catherine Daly

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Eyeglasses are traditionally defined as a frame that holds lenses that sit on the bridge of the nose and atop the ears. They may simultaneously improve vision, protect the wearer and enhance their appearance. Over time, vision, protection, aesthetics and fashion have contributed to the necessity as well as popularity of eyeglasses. There are many related terms for eyeglasses and some have more cache in different parts of the world as well as different eras. Eyewear comes into use in the 1920s, em

The Black Leather Jacket

Marilyn DeLong, Kelly Gage, Juyeon Park and Monica Sklar

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the United States, the black leather jacket has been worn throughout much of the twentieth century. During World Wars I and II it was worn mostly for its functional and protective properties, for example, by pilots, who wore the leather bomber jacket. When the leather jacket became the choice of heroic wartime figures such as General Patton in World War II, the details of the jacket were not yet strictly defined.

Dress as Costume in the Theater and Performing Arts

Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In costume, individuals become characters of plays. Dressing for the performing arts works the same way. The performing arts include theater, dance, opera, films, television, and the circus. Costumes are made up of supplements to the body such as gowns and wigs, also including body modifications like makeup. Stylized Japanese Noh masks completely transform actors and constitute artwork in themselves. Throughout most of the history of theater, actors had to supply their own makeup and costumes, bu

Fashion Icons

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Jacqueline Lee Bouvier was born into a wealthy family and raised to a life of privilege. Her 1953 marriage to Senator Jack Kennedy at the wealthy enclave of Newport, Rhode Island, was one of the most glittering social events of the decade. Mrs. Kennedy became a popular figure during the 1960 presidential campaign; after her husband’s election, her beauty, love of clothes, and sense of style set her apart from her rather plain predecessors as First Lady, Bess Truman and Mamie Eisenhower. Criticize

Celebrities

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

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