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Hussein Chalayan, Spring/Summer 1995

Barbara Brownie

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Hussein Chalayan’s spring/summer 1995 collection, entitled “Temporary Interference,” was his second commercial collection. It contributed to establishing Chalayan not only as a fashion designer, but as a philosopher and artist for whom clothes are a medium for provoking questions and symbolizing complex notions about human ambition. With this collection, Chalayan explores man’s ill-fated attempts to elevate himself to the status of the divine. Helium-filled balloons pull full-length slip dresses

Yohji Yamamoto

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

Yamamoto and Kawakubo brought the beauty of poverty to the most glamorous stage of the world—the catwalks of Paris. In their 1981 joint collection, they paraded garments which symbolized neediness, destitution and hardship—clothing that appeared to have been picked up from rag-bags. They were entirely black in colour and irregular in shape, with oddly positioned pockets and fastenings. Their size appeared voluminous, as if the space between the external garment and the body had been exaggerated,

Rei Kawakubo and Comme des Garçons

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

Vera Mackie (2003: 144)… women [in Japan] were condemned to be ‘mothers’ or ‘whores’.

Beauty, Nature, and Equality

Ingun Grimstad Klepp

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the Greek mythical universe, beauty was a gift from the gods, associated with order and cosmos. This mentality was later discredited in Western culture, as physical beauty became considered superficial or even sinful. The situation today is paradoxical: in the world of fairytales, literature, and magazines, beauty is worshipped, yet there is no theoretical reflection around this. One of the main ideals of democracy is the individual’s opportunity to achieve status through actions; hence, empha

Simmel, Georg

Ulrich Lehmann

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The methodological mix of metaphysics, economics, and social theory generated for Simmel an interest in fashion, which he viewed as a theoretical and material field of investigation that offered space for emphatic, almost literary, evocations of clothing but also for a formal description of (dress) codes as visual and structural primers for social groups and settings. He began to investigate the topic in an 1895 essay titled “Zur Psychologie der Mode” (On the psychology of fashion). In this essay

Tigersprung: Fashioning History

Ulrich Lehmann

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

The tiger walked humanly enough on its two hind legs; it wore the suit of a dandy in the most refined elegance, and this suit was so perfectly tailored that it was difficult to distinguish the body of the animal underneath the flared grey trousers, the waistcoat embroidered with flowers, the brilliant white jabot with pleats beyond reproach and the morning coat fitted by a master's hand.

Does Fashion Need a Theory?

Ingrid Loschek

Source: When Clothes Become Fashion. Design and Innovation Systems 2009

Book chapter

What do Marcel Duchamp’s Urinoir, which he interpreted as the art object Fountain in 1917, and a dress full of holes that Julien McDonald created, which he defined as a lace dress in 1997, have in common? Neither work ‘functions’ without the underlying tension between what is visible and the statement made about it. In 1917, Duchamp submitted the urinal as an artwork for the annual exhibition of the Society of Independent Artists in New York. His claim was that the context—the art exhibition, the

Between Clothing and Nudity

Mario Perniola

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

In the figurative arts, eroticism appears as a relationship between clothing and nudity. Therefore, it is conditional on the possibility of movement – transit – from one state to the other. If either of these poles takes on a primary or essential significance to the exclusion of the other, then the possibility for this transit is sacrificed, and with it the conditions for eroticism. In such cases, either clothing or nudity becomes an absolute value.

The Philosophy of Fashion

Georg Simmel

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

Man's desire to please his social environment contains two contradictory tendencies, in whose play and counterplay in general, the relations among individuals take their course. On the one hand, it contains kindness, a desire of the individual to give the other joy; but on the other hand, there is the wish for this joy and these ‘favours’ to flow back to him, in the form of recognition and esteem, so that they be attributed to his personality as values. Indeed, this second need is so intensified

Signs of Bliss in Textures and Textiles

Dagmar Venohr

Source: Fashion in Fiction. Text and Clothing in Literature, Film, and Television 2009

Book chapter

Thomas Carlyle and ‘Sartor Resartus’

Michael Carter

Source: Fashion Classics from Carlyle to Barthes 2003

Book chapter

perhaps only a german savant could do the subject full justice.

Georg Simmel: Clothes and Fashion

Michael Carter

Source: Fashion Classics from Carlyle to Barthes 2003

Book chapter

Fashion is haughty, trifling, affected, servile, despotic, mean and ambitious, precise and fantastical, all in a breath – tied to no rule, and bound to conform to every whim of the minute.

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