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Ann Demeulemeester

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Stephen Sprouse

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Dirk Bikkembergs

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Dries Van Noten

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Fetish

Frenchy Lunning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This article discusses the origins and history of fetish fashions (and gives an explanation of forms and functions) from the late nineteenth century to the early twenty-first century. Beginning with late nineteenth-century Paris, when these forms came into play, it tracks the development through modernist culture and into the postmodern culture of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, noting the similar cultural conditions of gender instabilities and roles. It explains how fetish f

The Handbag from the 1970s to 2000

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The need to collect, carry, and contain one’s belongings has existed for as long as humanity. From sacks to hold prehistoric flint and pouches for early coins to purses with contemporary cosmetics, various types of handbags have appeared in art and writing throughout history. While always fulfilling a practical function, handbags have also evolved with changing needs. They can be signifiers of fashion, social status, and even psychological state, as they mediate the boundaries between interior an

1970s Style: Key Themes and Trends

Jo Turney

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The 1970s established fashion as performance, an element of cultures of display in which the street became catwalk (and vice versa), fusing fashion with media such as music, dance, film, and art. It was a decade of imagination and individuality, resulting from newfound social and personal freedoms (Tom Wolfe dubbed it the “Me” decade) which combined with a sartorial knowingness created a new confidence in the presentation of the self—anything was possible and the only limits were of one’s imagina

1944–2011: Postwar Revivalism and Transorientalism

Adam Geczy

Source: Fashion and Orientalism. Dress, Textiles and Culture from the 17th to the 21st Century 2013

Book chapter

To call the toga or the mandarin’s gown ‘chic’ is to suggest a process of change which barely existed in ancient Rome or China; the clothes of the beefeater of the samurai are eminently respectable, precisely because they are not up to date; the tarboosh was never ‘all the go’ for it has never gone.

Issey Miyake

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

Clothes … speak many languages … and have to be seen on the outside … as well as felt on the inside.

Techno Textiles

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

While there are a number of monolithic factories in Japan, such as Toray, the largest textile company in the world, which are technically advanced and automated, the majority of operators are small and simple by comparison. Toray has expanded its base of synthetic fibres and textiles to include many other fields, such as plastics and chemicals, advanced composite materials, pharmaceutical and medical products, construction materials, housing, and engineering. Many of the smaller factories, includ

Global Influences: Challenging Western Traditions

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

The Maison Margiela teamThe designers that we most admire are ‘those with an authentic approach to their work.’

Branding, Fashion and Music

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion and Music 2011

Book chapter

A kind of special status for creative people is part of a set of characteristics constructed in the nineteenth century by the writers, poets, composers and painters that Raymond Williams (1971) labels the ‘Romantic Artists’. Williams argues that a certain mystique and an almost stereotypical artistic personality were created by and around sets of individuals as a method of resistance to encroaching industrialization.

Tradition and Fashion

Elizabeth D. Lowe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

One might think that because Canada and the United States are countries that can be considered technologically advanced and would be characterized as thoroughly modern societies, the role of fashion in the lives of these countries’ residents would be strong and the place of tradition would be minimal. But to understand where and how tradition and fashion contrast, complement, and intersect in these modern Western societies, it is necessary to begin by exploring the meaning of these concepts.

Barthes, Roland

Nicole Pellegrin

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Following Jean-Baptiste Farges and Andy Stafford, one can try to distinguish three moments—but they are also three directions, closely connected but not successive— in the activities and the life of Barthes: the polemical journalist immediately after the war, the triumphant yet marginal university professor of the postwar boom, and the elusive “novelist” celebrated by the entire intelligentsia of the left in the 1970s.

Research Approaches

Lise Skov and Marie Riegels Melchior

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress and fashion are rich and varied fields of study. Some scholars refer to them as “hybrid subjects” because they bring together different conceptual frameworks and disciplinary approaches, including those from anthropology, art history, cultural studies, design studies, economics, history, home economics (in the early twenty-first century more likely to be known as “family and consumer studies” or “human ecology”), literature, semiotics, sociology, visual culture, and business studies. Invari

Baudrillard, Jean

Efrat Tseëlon

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Initially, Baudrillard argued that when products move from the realm of function (reflecting use value and exchange value) to the realm of signification (reflecting sign value), they become carriers of social meaning. Specifically, they become “objects.” Baudrillard’s notion of sign value is based on an analogy between a system of objects (commodity) and a system of sign (language). He applied Ferdinand de Saussure’s structural linguistics to the study of fashion, media, ideologies, and images. I

When Is Fashion Design?

Ingrid Loschek

Source: When Clothes Become Fashion. Design and Innovation Systems 2009

Book chapter

An object is not a design object as such; it becomes one as a consequence of the pretension with which the object is used. This pretension is based on a social component. A functional object such as a car tyre may become design when adapted into a table, from which the question emerges: When is design? The car tyre is design when it is recognised and declared as such, and thus becomes socially relevant. With reference to the alienation of objects in design, for example a bucket painted in bright

Uniforms in Fashion and Popular Culture

Jennifer Craik

Source: Uniforms Exposed. From Conformity to Transgression 2005

Book chapter

The use of uniforms in popular culture has become endemic. We have already examined the uptake of uniforms from sporting arenas to everyday leisure sites, from formal uniforms to consensual quasi-uniforms at work, and the concluding chapter explores transgressive contexts and subcultures. So, why this proliferation of uniforms and the associated obsession with uniforms in contemporary popular culture? Alan Hunt (1996) has related the legislation of sumptuary laws to the moral regulation of popula

Adoption and Consumption of Fashion

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Fashion-ology. An Introduction to Fashion Studies 2005

Book chapter

The model of modern-day consumption originated in pre-revolutionary court life, especially that of Louis XIV of France (1638-1715) who was known as ‘the consumer king.’ He indulged himself in lavish and opulent clothing and ornamentation. Handmade carpets, upholstery and curtains were changed every season at Versailles. Louis XIV is remembered for his sumptuous style of life rather than the important military, religious, or political events during his reign. There was the closed world of courtly

Reworking Subculture

Paul Hodkinson

Source: Goth. Identity, Style and Subculture 2002

Book chapter

The beginnings of subcultural theory involved various theorists associated with what became known as the Chicago School (see Whyte 1943; Gordon 1947; A. Cohen 1955; Becker 1963; Irwin 1970). Though the emphasis of the theorists varies, the school is most famous for a conception of subcultures as deviant groups, whose emergence had to do with ‘the interaction of people’s perceptions of themselves with others’ view of them’ (Gelder and Thornton 1997: 11). This is, perhaps, best summarized in Albert

From Closet to Wardrobe?

Jan Winn and Diane Nutt

Source: Through the Wardrobe. Women’s Relationships with Their Clothes 2001

Book chapter

The popular image of the lesbian has moved from the manly, riding-crop-wielding Radclyffe Hall type, through the dungareed man-hating feminist to designer dykes and leather girls. Lesbianism has a new non-transgressive image in the media, and the lesbian world is doing its damnedest to fight off any smudges of feminism and aim for a sexuality as outlawish as that of gay men. (Ainley, 1995, p. 1)

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