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AllSaints

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Greasers

Else Skjold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

“Greasers” were devotees of a subcultural style originally for young, working-class men (later also women) that emerged in the 1950s in the United States. The word “grease” refers to the wax or pomade used to make the characteristic hairdo of the look, which also typically included biker boots, jeans, T-shirts, and leather jackets. Groupings of greasers would often appear in motorcycle gangs around the emerging rock ’n’ roll scene, and parts of the subculture formed the motorcycle club “Hell’s An

Visual Media and Dress

Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Gibson Church

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual media have played an enormous role in the development of fashion in West Europe. Fashion imagery emerged within print journalism, more specifically women’s magazines, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The development of popular cinema in the first half of the twentieth century had a momentous impact on the global fashion industry, especially in the star system, the “tie-in,” and the involvement of both couturiers and ready-to-wear designers in film. From the radical changes of th

Television

Patricia A. Cunningham

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In 1948, when Wayne Cox of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) pronounced that television is here to stay, he could not have predicted the real impact this new force unleashed. Writing in 1964, Marshall McLuhan had a better grasp of the situation, claiming that television had potential to transform the world into a “global village.” Television is a powerful tool that gains its power through its ability to express ideas through sight and sound. Fashion and television began a symbiotic rela

Dance and Fashion

Thomas Hecht

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The nineteenth century was dedicated to the waltz, which had developed as a bourgeois activity in Europe and America. In May I Have the Pleasure?, Belinda Quirey argues that in the wake of political, romantic, and industrial revolutions, the waltz was a completely new dance form that perfectly suited the new conditions of modern life—socially, psychologically, and materially. These nineteenth-century developments in dance were reflected in elaborate dance costumes for lower-and middle-class women

Music and Dress in Canada

Martha Ladly

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Canadian musicians have struggled with many of the same issues that challenge Canadian artists of all persuasions: primary among them, the proximity and overwhelming influence of U.S. culture. The Canadian journalist Robert Fulford described Canadians as living a “two-tiered life” in that they absorb the culture, politics, and social issues of both the United States and Canada.

Indonesian Indie (DIY) Fashion

Brent Luvaas

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Derived from independent, the term indie refers to music, film, fashion, or any other creative medium produced and distributed on a small scale, often by the artists themselves, outside of established commercial channels. In Indonesia, the world’s fourth most populous nation, spread out over some seventeen thousand islands in Southeast Asia and Oceania, the moniker has recently been taken on by hundreds of young fashion designers. These designers are turning away from both international couture a

Subcultural Dress

David Muggleton and Dunja Brill

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A subculture can be defined as a group with particular shared cultural features that distinguish it clearly from other subcultures and both the specific milieu (parent culture) and wider society (dominant culture) from which it emerges. The definition of culture on which this notion of a subculture is based is borrowed from anthropology and is taken to mean a whole way of life of a society or particular section thereof, depending on the level of analysis. A subculture can therefore be seen as a d

Popular Music and Dress in Australia

Sue Ryan

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Australian pop and rock music has been inseparable from fashion since the 1950s. Australia had a popular musical culture from the first days of European settlement, but in the 1950s rock ’n’ roll and pop began to dominate other musical forms. Taking shape as an industry, they were supported by and supported the arrival of television, the growing print media, and radio, which continued to be an essential social bond and cultural disseminator. Dress was increasingly the key that proved to audiences

Iceland

Æsa Sigurjónsdóttir

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Iceland was part of the Danish kingdom from the fourteenth century until its independence in 1944. Despite geographical isolation, Icelanders have always kept up with European fashions. However, artist and antiquarian Sigurður Guðmundsson (1833–1874) encouraged women not to follow European styles, but to adopt a simple everyday dress. His article on the subject in 1857 had an enduring influence on women’s dress in Iceland, although his proposal in 1871 for a men’s national outfit failed. Men’s ev

Music and Dress

Else Skjold

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Music and dress have played a significant role in the civilization process in West Europe. Both being aesthetic fields meant to be performed and put into play by human gesture, they have proved to be efficient tools for cultivating the movements, postures, and gestures of the body. The material, cut, and shape of dress have manipulated the body to move in certain ways, as have rhythms and expressions in music. Significant for West Europe has been a duality between spirit and body, causing a divis

Music and Dress in the United States

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The music and dress of the United States reflects its diverse and multicultural population made up of indigenous and immigrant groups, from North American Indians to Irish immigrants. The United States has a wide variety of music styles, from folk music to hip-hop, and related dress trends, from broomstick skirts to hubcap medallion necklaces.

Setting the Scene

Dunja Brill

Source: Goth Culture. Gender, Sexuality and Style 2008

Book chapter

Spring 2003, Lowlife, a Goth clubnight in Brighton (England). More than a decade later I am again sitting in the corner of a smoke-filled club, watching people dance. The eerie guitar sounds have become rare over the years; the rhythms have got faster and harsher, and so have the dance styles. I spot a man with a crew cut, combat fatigues and a muscle shirt, stomping back and forth in a martial manner to the sound of distorted electronic beats. Next to him there is a girl dressed in a tight black

Goth Music and Media

Dunja Brill

Source: Goth Culture. Gender, Sexuality and Style 2008

Book chapter

As a music-based subculture, Goth and its gendered meanings call for an analysis of how gender is represented in Gothic music and the subcultural music press. However, there is a crucial difference between the self-representations of individual Goths in interviews or Internet forums, on the one hand, and the mediated, formally published sonic, textual and visual representations in Goth music and media, on the other hand. There exist different cultural fields in or through which the Gothic subcult

Television and Fashion in the 1980s

Patricia A. Cunningham, Heather Mangine and Andrew Reilly

Source: Twentieth-Century American Fashion 2008

Book chapter

Editors’ Introduction: The 1980s continued to be influenced by the importance of dressing for success. In fact, the cult of success was seen in the increased consumption of luxury goods by Americans. The Reagan years in America were indeed bountiful. Clothing became ostentatious and worn as a badge of achievement. A coterie of American designers – Donna Karan, Ralph Lauren, and Liz Claiborne – offered women padded shoulders and broad lapels to express their new-found position and commercial power

Events, Friendships and Commitment

Paul Hodkinson

Source: Goth. Identity, Style and Subculture 2002

Book chapter

Before we address the importance of specifically goth-oriented or subcultural events, there is a need to examine the role played by more mixed events attended by goths. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was not uncommon for goths to form a reasonable proportion of the clientele for general ‘alternative’ events, which also accommodated punks, indie fans, crusties and others. Toward the early 1990s, however, the stylistic emphasis of many such events had moved away from goth, in favour of l

Selling Goth? The Producers of Subculture

Paul Hodkinson

Source: Goth. Identity, Style and Subculture 2002

Book chapter

As one might expect, non-subcultural producers varied considerably in wealth and influence, ranging from transnational major record companies to local independent shop owners. In the main, non-subcultural producers provided media, consumables and events oriented to a mass or large niche market (Thornton (1995): 122–60), but it is worth noting that they also played their part in certain products which, due to their highly specialist audience orientation or limited availability, could be described

Buying Goth: Subcultural Shopping

Paul Hodkinson

Source: Goth. Identity, Style and Subculture 2002

Book chapter

Whilst emphasizing the importance of consumer goods to subcultural styles, Dick Hebdige (1977, 1979) positions the creative use of these, prior to the moment of commercial incorporation at least, as resistant to hegemonic capitalism. More specifically, subcultural styles involved a ‘semiotic guerrilla warfare’, whereby external everyday consumer goods were appropriated into a subcultural context and took on new, subversive meanings (ibid. 1979: 105). This book has already questioned notions of st

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