Results: Text (105) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 105 (5 pages)
    Page 1 of 5
Sunglasses

Vanessa Brown

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

By the late 1960s, sunglasses were a well-established fashion accessory, having accumulated numerous valuable meanings within Western visual culture: speed, technology, military power, celebrity, travel, glamour, and the outsider cool of black American jazzmen, beatniks, rap artists, cinematic gangsters, and femmes fatales. Subsequently, sunglasses became increasingly significant to fashion, providing lucrative licensing opportunities as well as creative potential to nuance clothes with desirable

Branding and Logos

Jennifer Grayer Moore

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Making the brand name or logo of a company a visible and often dominant design feature in a piece of apparel or on an accessory became a defining feature in fashion in the latter part of the twentieth century, especially from 1970 onward. Icons, initials, full names of designers or design houses, and often a combination of two of the aforementioned were woven, printed, embroidered, stamped, and engraved into every conceivable type of material, sometimes as a single motif and often in endless repe

The Chanel “2.55” Handbag, Fall/Winter 1995

Julia Rea

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Since its introduction in February 1955, the “2.55” handbag has formed an integral and enduring part of the House of Chanel’s stylistic vocabulary of accessories. Its recurring role as an immediately recognizable and iconic symbol of both the brand’s unique heritage and contemporary identity is a rare example of a fashion object that embodies a contradictory blend of permanence and continuous renewal. By examining the historical context of the 2.55 bag through the lens of a contemporary version,

Statement Jewelry in Contemporary Catwalk Fashion

Julia Rea

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Statement jewelry is defined by its role as a communicator of meaning, extending beyond jewelry’s traditional function as a decorative medium in order to express status, culture, and personality. As a “genre” it is characterized by its exaggerated proportions, bold shapes and colors, and its employment of a wide range of materials other than conventional precious metals and gemstones. By focusing on notable examples from 1990s catwalk fashion, this exploration will trace the historical and cultur

1970s Style: Key Themes and Trends

Jo Turney

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The 1970s established fashion as performance, an element of cultures of display in which the street became catwalk (and vice versa), fusing fashion with media such as music, dance, film, and art. It was a decade of imagination and individuality, resulting from newfound social and personal freedoms (Tom Wolfe dubbed it the “Me” decade) which combined with a sartorial knowingness created a new confidence in the presentation of the self—anything was possible and the only limits were of one’s imagina

Bibliographic guide

A number of scholars have helped to develop the field of aesthetics of dress using a multidisciplinary approach. An early literature review was completed by dress scholars DeLong et al. (1974). Marilyn Horn (1975), also a dress scholar, approached the study of clothing as an interdisciplinary topic. Later, DeLong and Ann Marie Fiore (1994), seeking to provide a better understanding of aesthetics of dress, edited a compilation of papers that included a variety of perspectives. Fiore, Patricia Kiml

Bibliographic guide

]Introductory texts on world religions are numerous and generally offer a selection of definitions—from the classic to more contemporary approaches that attempt to embrace all religions under a problematical single all-encompassing definition. In the study of religion, theoretical frameworks vary from the sociological, psychological, and anthropological to the neurophysiological; there are also those from studies in religion. Scholars of religion Willard G. Oxtoby and Alan F. Segal, in A Concise

Bibliographic guide

In academic literature, the words “sex” and “gender” have specific meanings that are interchangeable in popular usage. To the scholar, “sex” is used to denote biological categories (male, female); “gender” is used for distinctions in role, appearance, and behavior that are cultural in origin, but stemming from an individual’s sex (masculinity and femininity). In practice, these classifications are more complex; recent scholarship has begun to take into consideration the fact that biological sex i

Miss Headscarf: Islamic Fashion and the Danish Media

Connie Carøe Christiansen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Whilst cultural commentators tended to downplay the aesthetic potential of the headscarf, contestants were generally more sensitive to its potential both as an item of fashion and self-cultivation. They were also conscious of the need to challenge perceptions of Muslim women through their appearance. In several of the Danish newspaper articles which featured the contest, young Muslim women in Denmark were given the opportunity to speak and to present another angle on the headscarf to that usually

Subcultural Body Style and Identity

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style 2012

Book chapter

Each subculture member has individual lived body experiences, which collectively create the generalizations about the subculture’s identity. These generalizations are then further extended to collective ideas about identity regarding the individual member, the specific subculture, and the entirety of all subcultures to some degree. The subcultural body becomes an amalgam of experiences—for example, piercings, tattoos, spiky hair, and propensity toward pain. Furthermore, each subculture has unwrit

A Comparative Exploration of Dress and the Presentation of Self as Implicit Religion

Eileen Barker

Source: Dressed to Impress. Looking the Part 2011

Book chapter

The study from which most of the caricatures are drawn ought perhaps to be introduced in general terms before turning to their implicit religion. It was a study that was, very broadly speaking, concerned with science and religion (both being widely defined). More precisely, my thesis was that the pluralism of ideological positions in modern society had created an embarras de choix in which just about the only expert who is officially sanctioned for his (or, occasionally, her) true, independent kn

Adapting Georg Simmel’s classic reflections on fashion, Daniel Miller and Sophie Woodward (2007: 341-2) have suggested that the near-global ubiquity of jeans offers people different ways of negotiating the conflicting socio-cultural forces of conformity and individuality. In Woodward’s British study, for instance, using a familiar and hardly spectacular example, jeans provided a ‘relief from the burden of mistaken choice and anxious self-composition’ that women continuously felt (Miller and Woodw

Dress Freedom: The Personal and the Political

William J.F. Keenan

Source: Dressed to Impress. Looking the Part 2011

Book chapter

[I]t is utterly unmeet to be too rigorous in urging a Uniformity of Gesture, or for any to be censorious of other men for a Gesture.

Conclusion: Music, Fashion, Image

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion and Music 2011

Book chapter

The notion of authenticity has been a texture running throughout this book. As I argued in the introduction and in chapters 1 and 2, music stars and their audiences are always reaching for an experience that resonates with the deeper aspects of the self. Thus, the relationship between music performer and audience is rooted in the emotions. This experience is often made all the more powerful because of a variety of aspects of performance, including embodiment. This is despite the fact that to focu

Introduction: Fashion, Identity, Authenticity and Music

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion and Music 2011

Book chapter

One of the challenges for anyone wishing to discuss music is the problem of categorization and organization around ideas of genre; the decision about where to place any music performance within definitions of genre can shape a variety of perceptions about what is expected of it. This, is turn, affects how a range of gestures which make up the whole performance are interpreted and understood. Thus, genres are packages of meaning that have attributed to them traditions, behaviours, forms of present

Indigo Bodies: Fashion, Mirror Work and Sexual Identity in Milan

Roberta Sassatelli

Source: Global Denim 2011

Book chapter

Pondering over her wardrobe, Francesca, a stylish, freshly graduated woman in her mid-twenties, says that, whilst they are ‘vital’ to her, ‘Denim jeans just sit with the rest [of her clothes]: they are just in the middle of the mess, but I take them out much more often, so always know where they are’ (Interview 15). These few words allude to the particular position that jeans – normal and yet special – occupy in young people dressing practices. This partly reflects what youth from Milan participa

Moko Māori: Skin Modification

Ngahuia Te Awekotuku, Linda Waimarie Nikora and Mohi Robert Rua

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Māori people settled Aotearoa (New Zealand) from the islands of the eastern Pacific, coming in successive waves over many centuries. They brought with them the languages, music, belief systems, and technologies of their cultures of origin. They also brought the practice of permanent skin modification. Tattoo chisels similar to those used in western Polynesia have been found in some of the earliest excavations. With the new environment came new resources: massive hardwood forests, nephrite and

Caribbean Islanders

José F. Blanco

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Caribbean immigrants have contributed greatly to the multicultural and multilingual diversity of the United States and Canada for a number of years. Often grouped either with other Hispanics or with African Americans, Caribbean people are actually part of a complex mosaic of cultures, languages, and dress practices. The Caribbean, named after its main pre-Columbian inhabitants, the Carib, has been shaped by the encounter of several cultures, including native groups such as the Puerto Rican Taínos

Body and Beauty

Patrizia Calefato

Translated by Sveva Scaramuzzi

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The concept of human “race” was extended for the first time from its meaning of “lineage” or “descent” by Georges Cuvier (1769–1823) who gave it a classificatory, hierarchical meaning. During the nineteenth century, this conception led to racial biology and eugenics. Notwithstanding the researchers’ intentions, the idea of “race” constituted the basis for nineteenth- and twentieth-century racist ideologies. The idea of feminine beauty also evolved in relation to the genesis of racism. Fashion bec

Lesbian and Gay Dress

Shaun Cole

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Although same-sex sexual activity has been occurring at least as long as the human race has been recording social activity, it was not until the late nineteenth century that terminology based on sexual identity replaced definitions and descriptions of sexual acts. Psychiatrists, sexologists, and human rights campaigners such as Richard von Krafft-Ebing, Karl Heinrich Ulrichs, and Karl Maria Kertbeny developed notions that same-sex attraction was related to identity and conceived terms such as urn

Introduction to Global Perspectives

Joanne B. Eicher

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dressing the body, a culturally and economically important activity, involves spending resources on the presentation of self, wherever one lives or shops. Dressing, however, goes beyond wearing clothing; human imagination creates infinite possibilities. How the body was dressed may have been more experimental in the early days of the human species than we imagine today. Early in human history, individuals made their own apparel or lived with the people who did. Today, personal production has grea

Dress and Identity

Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress is a visual form of communication. Before two people are close enough to each other to exchange words, they communicate a world of information (or misinformation) through dress. They may register gender, age, ethnic origin, income, social status, rank, occupation, group membership, sexual availability, personality, opinions, beliefs, tastes, interests, and mood. Some scholars have suggested that because so much information is exchanged through the medium of dress, face-to-face social intera

Middle Eastern

Mary H. Farahnakian

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The dress and fashion of Middle Eastern immigrants emphasize copying, retooling, and reinterpreting traditions and developing new identities in the United States and Canada. These changes are generally influenced by their immigration background, dress design, and values of traditional and nontraditional immigrants. They also include religious values and customs as well as types, significance, and appropriateness of dress fit and design.

American Immigrants of West European Origin

Judy Zaccagnini Flynn

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The dress of North American immigrants from Western Europe is a reflection of the evolution of their sociocultural experience as they went from their homelands to the New World. Immigration has existed from the early times of settlement in North America to the present. Western Europe (defined in 1890 as Italy, Spain, France, Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Netherlands, Austria-Hungry, Switzerland, France, and Luxembourg) provided the largest number of immigrants to the United Sta

The Novel and Dress

Clair Hughes

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The stories of Beatrix Potter would have no plots, someone remarked, if the animals had no clothes. This cannot be said of fictional characters in general, but all the same, authors do not usually send their characters naked into the world—dress can play a surprisingly important role in their narratives. The clothes described and illustrated by Potter anchor her animals to a workaday rural society. They bridge the gap between nineteenth-century reality and Potter’s version of it: a miniature worl

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 105 (5 pages)
Page 1 of 5