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Television

Patricia A. Cunningham

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In 1948, when Wayne Cox of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) pronounced that television is here to stay, he could not have predicted the real impact this new force unleashed. Writing in 1964, Marshall McLuhan had a better grasp of the situation, claiming that television had potential to transform the world into a “global village.” Television is a powerful tool that gains its power through its ability to express ideas through sight and sound. Fashion and television began a symbiotic rela

Polish Urban Dress in Transition from Socialism to Post-Socialism

Bogna Dowgiałło and Agnieszka Burska

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Material poverty and dramatically changed social structures influenced most Polish dress in the immediate postwar period. Because ethnic minorities had been either deported or exterminated and because both the Nazis and the Soviets had taken steps to eliminate the prewar elite, Polish society had become nearly homogenous.

Department Store

Bronwen Edwards

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

An important innovation of department stores was their wide variety of merchandise, breaching the boundaries of previously largely trade-specific shop-keeping. Many of the early department stores actually developed from smaller existing shops, most commonly drapers. They grew department by department, taking over neighboring properties to house the expanding businesses, until it was necessary to provide a new building or reface the existing ones to provide coherence. Department store pioneer Will

Dress for Success

Joanne Entwistle

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The exposition of the “rules” of business dress are laid down in dress manuals, such as the now-classic John T. Molloy’s two manuals, Dress for Success (first published in the United States in 1975) and Women: Dress for Success (published in the United States in 1979). These manuals describe his formula for “successful" dressing. What Molloy calls his “wardrobe engineering” is a (pseudo) “science of clothing” based on quantitative “testing” of the different meanings individuals give to individual

Clothing Provision and the Great Wardrobe in the Mid-Thirteenth Century

Kay Staniland

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

The King sends to the fair of St. Ives William the Tailor and John le Fleming to purchase for the King's use

Ideologies and Politics of Consumption

Judd Stitziel

Source: Fashioning Socialism. Clothing, Politics, and Consumer Culture in East Germany 2005

Book chapter

“Need” (Bedürfnis) was the most important concept in the East German discourse on socialism’s goal of a sort of consumer paradise.For the long and complex history of the concept of need, see MichaelIgnatieff, The Needs of Strangers (New York, 1985); MargitSzöllösi-Janze, “Notdurft - Bedürfnis. Historische Dimensionen eines Begriffswandels,” Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht48 (1997): 653–73. For discussions of need in Marxist theory, see EdmondPreteceille and Jean-PierreTerrail, Capitalis

From “New Out of Old” to “Socialist Fashion”: Patching Together an Alternative Consumer Culture

Judd Stitziel

Source: Fashioning Socialism. Clothing, Politics, and Consumer Culture in East Germany 2005

Book chapter

This declaration in Die Frau von heute in February 1946 expressed common hopes for a fresh start and for new cultural forms that could serve as the basis of transformed attitudes toward consumption and social distinction. The Trümmerfrau, or rubble woman, with her work clothes and a scarf over her pulled-up hair, personified for many Germany’s “zero hour” – also in the world of fashion – and later became an important mythological component of West and East German identities.ElizabethHeinemann, “T

The Disillusionment of Dreams of Distinction: Hochmodisch Apparel, Fashion Boutiques, and Exquisit Stores

Judd Stitziel

Source: Fashioning Socialism. Clothing, Politics, and Consumer Culture in East Germany 2005

Book chapter

Not everyone enthusiastically endorsed such special stores, which embodied a fundamental ambivalence in official policies about the balance among the fulfillment of “basic needs,” desires for differentiation, and the regime’s economic exigencies. In establishing pricing policies, party leaders quickly achieved a consensus that all citizens had a right to “basic” or “standard” consumer goods. Functionaries disagreed, however, about the degree of choice and differentiation to which consumers should

Shopping, Sewing, Networking, Complaining: Consumer Practices and the Relationship between State and Society

Judd Stitziel

Source: Fashioning Socialism. Clothing, Politics, and Consumer Culture in East Germany 2005

Book chapter

Starting already in the late 1940s, East Germans embarked on shopping trips with very specific desires and went from store to store and even from city to city in efforts to satisfy them.LAB, C Rep. 106, Nr. 142, Aktenvermerk, Köhler, Planök. Abt., Berlin, 19 March 1949. During the first major stage in the elimination of rationing for clothing and shoes in February 1951, a state trade official remarked that “the streets offered an almost peacetime-like picture, that is, women are beginning to sele

How To Be a Fairy Princess

Samantha Holland

Source: Alternative Femininities. Body, Age and Identity 2004

Book chapter

Who can imagine a fairy princess with hair that is anything but long and blonde, with eyes that are anything but blue, in clothes that are anything but a filmy drape of gossamer and gauze? The fairy princess remains one of the most powerful symbols of femininity the Western world has ever devised, and falling short of her role model, women are all feminine failures to some degree. (1984: 44)

Coquettes and Grisettes

Jennifer M. Jones

Source: Sexing La Mode. Gender, Fashion and Commercial Culture in Old Regime France 2004

Book chapter

Modes, Marchandes de: It is a large community, born of the luxury of women, fed by coquetry, and thriving as long as the taste for frivolity is the ruling passion. To the eyes of the observer who seeks to discover the cause of moral corruption, the infinite number of boutiques of the Marchandes de modes, the art with which one decorates these boutiques, the different finery that one exposes there to the eyes of passersby, are all sources of danger. What young woman has the strength to shield her

Buying Goth: Subcultural Shopping

Paul Hodkinson

Source: Goth. Identity, Style and Subculture 2002

Book chapter

Whilst emphasizing the importance of consumer goods to subcultural styles, Dick Hebdige (1977, 1979) positions the creative use of these, prior to the moment of commercial incorporation at least, as resistant to hegemonic capitalism. More specifically, subcultural styles involved a ‘semiotic guerrilla warfare’, whereby external everyday consumer goods were appropriated into a subcultural context and took on new, subversive meanings (ibid. 1979: 105). This book has already questioned notions of st

Young Women and Their Wardrobes

Pamela Abbott and Francesca Sapsford

Source: Through the Wardrobe. Women’s Relationships with Their Clothes 2001

Book chapter

In the youth cultural writings of the 1950s and 1960s, there was a clear relationship between style and youth. The young generation were seen to be different, there was seen to be a generation gap, and dress style and music and so on were seen as an important ‘uniform’ for membership of an age group and generation. Particular styles of dress were associated with particular groups of young people: the mods and rockers, for example. Youth culture was not seen as an undifferentiated mass, but as a n

Big Girls’ Blouses: Learning to Live with Polyester

Alison Adam

Source: Through the Wardrobe. Women’s Relationships with Their Clothes 2001

Book chapter

Where do I start? As a researcher who writes mostly on gender and technology, particularly information technology, I have lived with ideas on women and feminism for a long time. In the course of that research I have often taken male writers to task for forgetting about bodies, for developing their computer systems as if brains, not bodies, were all that mattered. Yet I am conscious that I am in danger of treating the idea of the body in just as abstract a fashion. It is the concept of the body I

Introduction

Maura Banim, Eileen Green and Ali Guy

Source: Through the Wardrobe. Women’s Relationships with Their Clothes 2001

Book chapter

‘Clothed bodies are tools of self-management.’ Craik (1994, p. 46)

Choosing an Image: Exploring Women’s Images through the Personal Shopper

Kate Gillen

Source: Through the Wardrobe. Women’s Relationships with Their Clothes 2001

Book chapter

Recently, televised ‘makeovers’ – in which a member of the public is plucked from obscurity and transformed, by virtue of clever hair, make-up and style consultants, into a glamorous creature – have become popular. Makeovers have now become almost ubiquitous, with a rash of television programmes portraying the results of makeovers not only on a person’s appearance, but also on their homes, gardens and even their cooking skills. Documentaries that follow the progress of raw recruits into shining p

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