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Seasonal Displays and Familiar Symbols

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

seasonal and familiar displays back to schoolcollegecollegeback to schoolIt happens every fall, starting with alphabet blocks and advancing to busts of CaesarCaesar and ShakespeareShakespeare. Symbols of back to school can attract the consumer and inspire memories from the past. Consider using a simple facade of a quaint little red schoolhouse, stacks of colorfully covered books, or a grid of backpacks on a wall surface. A current favorite is black or green chalkboard paint. A chalkboard-painted

Public Relations

Kristen K. Swanson and Judith C. Everett

Source: Promotion In The Merchandising Environment, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“In recent years, the business of fashion PR has been transformed by a series of seismic forces. Digital technology has reshaped the media landscape, giving rise to new communications strategies rooted in the realities of the Internet: open, conversational, immediate and always-on.”

Fashion Shows and Special Events

Kristen K. Swanson and Judith C. Everett

Source: Promotion In The Merchandising Environment, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“This collection is dedicated to the women who inspire me and to the showgirl in all of us.”

Etruria and Rome c. 800 BCE – 400 CE

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Prehistoric human occupants of the Italian peninsula migrated to Italy from many different places: Africa, Sicily, Spain, France, the Danube Valley, and Switzerland. They left no written records and are known only through archeological remains. These remains tell us they were pastoral people who tilled the soil, wove clothing, and made pottery and bronze implements. Among the pre-Roman peoples who migrated into Italy, none left a deeper impression than the Etruscans.

The Seventeenth Century 1600–1700

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dress is often used to communicate social status in both obvious and subtle ways. In a society in which social classes are well defined, customs relating to dress are frequently a visible symbol of one’s rank.

The Eighteenth Century 1700–1790

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Upon the death of Louis XIV in 1715, his great-grandson, Louis XV, became king of France at the age of 5. During the time that the king was too young to reign alone, a period called the Regency (1715–1723), baroque art styles that had dominated in the previous century underwent a gradual change. The new style lines were less massive, the curves were more slender and delicate, and an emphasis on asymmetrical balance gained importance. This new, rococo, style reached its height during the reign of

The Sixties and Seventies: Style Tribes Emerge 1960–1980

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The years that encompassed the Vietnam conflict were marked by social upheaval and turmoil in the United States. Opposition to the war among the young, continuing efforts to right the wrongs of segregation and racial discrimination, the rise of feminism, and the budding environmental movement all contributed to a period of tumult that was clearly reflected in the fashions of the period.

The Eighteenth Century, 1700–1790

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

The Directoire Period and the Empire Period, 1790–1820

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

The Romantic Period, 1820–1850

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

The Twenties, Thirties, and World War II, 1920–1947

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

The Sixties and Seventies: Style Tribes Emerge, 1960–1980

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

The Eighties and the Nineties: Fragmentation of Fashion, 1980–1999

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Extraordinary Times

Ira Neimark

Source: The Rise of Fashion and Lessons Learned at Bergdorf Goodman, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

I first became aware of Paris when I was six years old. Not through history or geography books, but in 1927 when Charles Lindbergh flew over the Atlantic Ocean solo to Paris in 33 and a half hours. Everyone in America, France, and the rest of the world was excited. So much so that when my father took me and my brother, Lester, to see the ticker-tape welcome-home parade for “Lucky Lindy” on Broadway, due to the tremendous crowds, we couldn’t get within two blocks of the street. We still went home

Norwegian Folk Dress in the United States

Carol Colburn

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Emigration from Norway to the United States lasted for approximately one hundred years, from 1825 to 1925. Norway’s terrain provided only three percent arable land; for Norwegian immigrants, the fertile plains in America’s Midwest were an attractive destination. Few packed distinctively Norwegian clothing, knowing that following local styles would indicate their intention to blend in. However, Norwegian dress echoed among the Norwegian American population through continued contact between Norway

Masquerade Dress

Cynthia Cooper

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Masquerade rituals and entertainments popular in North America were initially derived from European tradition and fashionable practices. Mummering and Mardi Gras, both forms of masked celebration that had roots in the Middle Ages in Europe, took on their own unique character in the specific regions of Canada and the United States where they persisted. When the European vogue for public masquerade declined at the beginning of the nineteenth century in favor of private fancy dress balls and parties

Austria

Irene Guenther

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Austria’s capital, Vienna, has been a political and cultural center, from which came a number of distinctive dress styles that influenced the rest of Europe. Among these are the dance dress for the waltz craze of the 1840s, as well as straw bonnets, which originated as peasant dress but were adopted as middle-class fashion, as was also the dirndl, which is the regional folk dress. As Austria was one of the great powers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Austrian dress has also been

Ceremonial and Special-Occasion Dress

Michaele Thurgood Haynes

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

There is a difference between the terms ceremonial and special-occasion dress. The latter is an out-of-the-ordinary event, possibly unique. Societal conventions create parameters as to what is acceptable wear at these times, but personal clothing choices made by the participants help make it a special occasion. Ceremonial refers to repeated events occurring within a set framework, a somewhat rigid and formalized series of actions. In anthropological terms, a ceremony is generally more suitably na

Aboriginal Dress in Southeast Australia

Sylvia Kleinert

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Dress embodies a complex system of meanings in Aboriginal society. On the one hand, dress is seen to be pivotal to the formation of individual and group identity, articulating relationships between private and public. On the other hand, dress expands our understanding of the way in which Aboriginal people have engaged in cross-cultural relations with a colonial regime. Prior to European contact, the dressed body and its embellishment with artifacts encoded multiple meanings as a marker of individ

Making and Retailing Exclusive Dress in Australia—1940s to 1960s

Roger Leong

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

From the 1940s through to the 1960s a handful of Australian society dressmakers, milliners, and quality stores made and sold couture-quality fashion. These key purveyors of exclusive and custom-made dress were found mainly in Sydney and Melbourne. They catered to an elite group of women, regarded as the leaders of fashionable society, whose demands for exclusive styles grew considerably after World War II. In the same period a small number of media organizations and department stores joined force

Dress for Rites of Passage

Annette Lynch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

A rite of passage is a series of ritualized acts moving an individual from one stage of life to another, a formal and public marking of changing status and position within society. Rituals are repeated patterned actions that serve to reinforce and publicly announce beliefs and values to both the participating initiate and a culturally aware audience. Dress as a visible sign of social position is very often used within rites of passage as a public symbol of changing identity, and a means of expres

Finland

Bo Lönnqvist

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Early nineteenth-century Finnish fashion was influenced by Stockholm, capital of Finland and Sweden since the thirteenth century. In the 1790s the Finnish upper classes wore styles influenced by rococo and neoclassicism, known as Gustavian after Gustavus III of Sweden. After the war of 1808–1809 Finland was separated from Sweden and annexed to the Russian Empire as a grand duchy until Finnish independence in 1917. A new bourgeois class developed. Male dress lost its extravagance, symbolizing bure

Urban Fashion Culture in Australia

Juliette Peers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Australian men’s and women’s fashions between 1870 and 1945 were rich, complex, and volatile. Clothing and textiles were a central pivot of settler society, from the social life of the small urban or rural elite, to the daily grind of thousands of factory hands in large cities. Despite the strong gender divide in Australia, fashionable dressing was not simply a female pursuit. Fewer men’s clothes have been collected, however, and they can be hard to identify as made in Australia unless specifical

The Melbourne Cup and Racewear in Australia

Juliette Peers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Racewear is a highly visible, lucrative clothing subgenre in Australia, broadly characterized by formality, conscious nostalgia, or conservatism. In state capitals, it is governed by dress codes detailed in promotional coverage and on racing clubs’ Web sites, an adroit way to emphasize the sport’s superior glamour. Racing has always had elite connotations; in Eurocentric nineteenth-century Australian social life, racing events were part of the social calendar. The prestigious Melbourne Cup, found

Dress in the Marshall Islands

Nancy J. Pollock

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The people of the two chains of atolls that make up the Marshall Islands have adopted styles of dress and adornment over the years to fit their cultural and social parameters. This attire reflects their aesthetics, modified by many outside influences from the times of early voyagers to the present. Dress materials and other items of embellishment were originally made from the islands’ resources, such as processed leaves and dyes, while latterly cotton materials have been used, along with local ma

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