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Norwegian Folk Dress in the United States

Carol Colburn

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Emigration from Norway to the United States lasted for approximately one hundred years, from 1825 to 1925. Norway’s terrain provided only three percent arable land; for Norwegian immigrants, the fertile plains in America’s Midwest were an attractive destination. Few packed distinctively Norwegian clothing, knowing that following local styles would indicate their intention to blend in. However, Norwegian dress echoed among the Norwegian American population through continued contact between Norway

Masquerade Dress

Cynthia Cooper

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Masquerade rituals and entertainments popular in North America were initially derived from European tradition and fashionable practices. Mummering and Mardi Gras, both forms of masked celebration that had roots in the Middle Ages in Europe, took on their own unique character in the specific regions of Canada and the United States where they persisted. When the European vogue for public masquerade declined at the beginning of the nineteenth century in favor of private fancy dress balls and parties

Austria

Irene Guenther

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Austria’s capital, Vienna, has been a political and cultural center, from which came a number of distinctive dress styles that influenced the rest of Europe. Among these are the dance dress for the waltz craze of the 1840s, as well as straw bonnets, which originated as peasant dress but were adopted as middle-class fashion, as was also the dirndl, which is the regional folk dress. As Austria was one of the great powers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Austrian dress has also been

Ceremonial and Special-Occasion Dress

Michaele Thurgood Haynes

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

There is a difference between the terms ceremonial and special-occasion dress. The latter is an out-of-the-ordinary event, possibly unique. Societal conventions create parameters as to what is acceptable wear at these times, but personal clothing choices made by the participants help make it a special occasion. Ceremonial refers to repeated events occurring within a set framework, a somewhat rigid and formalized series of actions. In anthropological terms, a ceremony is generally more suitably na

Aboriginal Dress in Southeast Australia

Sylvia Kleinert

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress embodies a complex system of meanings in Aboriginal society. On the one hand, dress is seen to be pivotal to the formation of individual and group identity, articulating relationships between private and public. On the other hand, dress expands our understanding of the way in which Aboriginal people have engaged in cross-cultural relations with a colonial regime. Prior to European contact, the dressed body and its embellishment with artifacts encoded multiple meanings as a marker of individ

Making and Retailing Exclusive Dress in Australia—1940s to 1960s

Roger Leong

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

From the 1940s through to the 1960s a handful of Australian society dressmakers, milliners, and quality stores made and sold couture-quality fashion. These key purveyors of exclusive and custom-made dress were found mainly in Sydney and Melbourne. They catered to an elite group of women, regarded as the leaders of fashionable society, whose demands for exclusive styles grew considerably after World War II. In the same period a small number of media organizations and department stores joined force

Dress for Rites of Passage

Annette Lynch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A rite of passage is a series of ritualized acts moving an individual from one stage of life to another, a formal and public marking of changing status and position within society. Rituals are repeated patterned actions that serve to reinforce and publicly announce beliefs and values to both the participating initiate and a culturally aware audience. Dress as a visible sign of social position is very often used within rites of passage as a public symbol of changing identity, and a means of expres

Finland

Bo Lönnqvist

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Early nineteenth-century Finnish fashion was influenced by Stockholm, capital of Finland and Sweden since the thirteenth century. In the 1790s the Finnish upper classes wore styles influenced by rococo and neoclassicism, known as Gustavian after Gustavus III of Sweden. After the war of 1808–1809 Finland was separated from Sweden and annexed to the Russian Empire as a grand duchy until Finnish independence in 1917. A new bourgeois class developed. Male dress lost its extravagance, symbolizing bure

Urban Fashion Culture in Australia

Juliette Peers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Australian men’s and women’s fashions between 1870 and 1945 were rich, complex, and volatile. Clothing and textiles were a central pivot of settler society, from the social life of the small urban or rural elite, to the daily grind of thousands of factory hands in large cities. Despite the strong gender divide in Australia, fashionable dressing was not simply a female pursuit. Fewer men’s clothes have been collected, however, and they can be hard to identify as made in Australia unless specifical

The Melbourne Cup and Racewear in Australia

Juliette Peers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Racewear is a highly visible, lucrative clothing subgenre in Australia, broadly characterized by formality, conscious nostalgia, or conservatism. In state capitals, it is governed by dress codes detailed in promotional coverage and on racing clubs’ Web sites, an adroit way to emphasize the sport’s superior glamour. Racing has always had elite connotations; in Eurocentric nineteenth-century Australian social life, racing events were part of the social calendar. The prestigious Melbourne Cup, found

Dress in the Marshall Islands

Nancy J. Pollock

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The people of the two chains of atolls that make up the Marshall Islands have adopted styles of dress and adornment over the years to fit their cultural and social parameters. This attire reflects their aesthetics, modified by many outside influences from the times of early voyagers to the present. Dress materials and other items of embellishment were originally made from the islands’ resources, such as processed leaves and dyes, while latterly cotton materials have been used, along with local ma

Ta’ovala and Kiekie of Tonga

Fanny Wonu Veys

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The wearing of waist wrappings such as t’ovala and kiekie in modern daily life distinguishes Tongan dress from that of its neighboring Pacific archipelagos. Indeed, the basic working dress of civil servants and the school uniforms of students consist of tailored clothing termed vala faka-palangi (foreigners-style clothing), complemented for both sexes by a ta’ovala or for women by a kiekie. Compared to barkcloth production, both ta’ovala and kiekie can be made by a woman on her own, as the materi

Eros and Liberty at the English Masquerade, 1710–90

Terry Castle

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

Introducing Ann Summers

Merl Storr

Source: Latex and Lingerie. Shopping for Pleasure at Ann Summers 2003

Book chapter

Girls just want to have fun!

‘The Ultimate Girls’ Night In’

Merl Storr

Source: Latex and Lingerie. Shopping for Pleasure at Ann Summers 2003

Book chapter

Join in the celebration and experience the Ultimate Girls Night In(Jacqueline Gold’s introduction to the autumn & winter 1999 Ann Summers catalogue)

Objects of Desire

Merl Storr

Source: Latex and Lingerie. Shopping for Pleasure at Ann Summers 2003

Book chapter

Commenting on Sedgwick’s model of male homosociality, Terry Castle suggests that homosocial bonds between women have the potential to disrupt the structure of male homosocial bonding: (Castle 1993: 72)To theorize about female–female desire, I would like to suggest, is precisely to envision the taking apart of this supposedly intractable patriarchal structure. Female bonding, at least hypothetically, destabilises the ‘canonical’ triangular arrangement of male desire, is an affront to it, and ultim

Feminine Bodies, Feminine Pleasures

Merl Storr

Source: Latex and Lingerie. Shopping for Pleasure at Ann Summers 2003

Book chapter

The erogenous body at Ann Summers events is not encountered directly, then, but is represented in games, jokes, anecdotes, images (including catalogue images) and other ways. As such it is always filtered through the homosocial: the things women say or show about their sex lives at meetings or parties may not necessarily give a precisely accurate picture of the erogenous body and its sexual practices. However I wish to avoid the implication that there is a genuine or authentic erogenous body (i.e

Classy Lingerie

Merl Storr

Source: Latex and Lingerie. Shopping for Pleasure at Ann Summers 2003

Book chapter

Sexual properties are as inseparable from class properties as the yellowness of a lemon is from its acidity […]. This is why there are as many ways of realizing femininity as there are classes and class fractions. (Bourdieu 1984: 107–8)

Conclusion

Merl Storr

Source: Latex and Lingerie. Shopping for Pleasure at Ann Summers 2003

Book chapter

Events, Friendships and Commitment

Paul Hodkinson

Source: Goth. Identity, Style and Subculture 2002

Book chapter

Before we address the importance of specifically goth-oriented or subcultural events, there is a need to examine the role played by more mixed events attended by goths. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was not uncommon for goths to form a reasonable proportion of the clientele for general ‘alternative’ events, which also accommodated punks, indie fans, crusties and others. Toward the early 1990s, however, the stylistic emphasis of many such events had moved away from goth, in favour of l

Express Yourself: Clubbing at the Blitz, the Batcave, and Beyond

Shaun Cole

Source: ‘Don We Now Our Gay Apparel’. Gay Men’s Dress in the Twentieth Century 2000

Book chapter

You’re Born Naked and the Rest is Drag!

Shaun Cole

Source: ‘Don We Now Our Gay Apparel’. Gay Men’s Dress in the Twentieth Century 2000

Book chapter

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