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Andrew Groves

Shonagh Marshall

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Bibliographic guide

Fashion as a research topic has been marginal and never been popular or mainstream in the field of social sciences. It was a topic often taken up by philosophers and moral/social critics in the first half of the nineteenth century, such as René König. Fashion scholars such as Yuniya Kawamura, Gilles Lipovetsky, Sandra Niessen, Anne Brydon, and Elizabeth Wilson have pointed out the academic devaluation of the topic. But with a growing number of academic journals and publications on fashion and dre

Bibliographic guide

In response to the question of what is the social psychology of dress, one first needs to address two related questions: what is dress and what is social psychology? The term dress has been defined by dress scholars Mary Ellen Roach and Joanne Eicher (1992) as the total arrangement of outwardly detectable body modifications and all material objects added to it in the form of body supplements. Body modifications are transformations made directly to the body and include making changes of color (e.g

Indonesia, Republik DIY

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Since gaining independence from the Dutch in 1949, the sprawling island nation of Indonesia has been, and continues to be, a decidedly tenuous union. Spread across some 17,000 islands in the South Pacific, the Indian Ocean, and the South China Sea, Indonesia is a country of incredible cultural, regional, and biological diversity. Its 233 million people, divided into more than two hundred distinct ethnic groups, practice an immense assortment of religions, from Hinduism to Protestantism and animis

DIY Capitalism: Class, Crisis, and the Rise of Indie Indonesia

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

It’s not just a fashion, it’s Indonesian creative movement!!

DIY in DIY (Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta): Everyday Production in the Indonesian Indie Scene

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

All the industries in Bandung emerged out of hanging out at first. The pioneers (of the indie scene) emerged out of the hangout spots…And it’s still like that to this day.

DIY Chic: Notes on Indie Style

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Be an original in a land full of fakes and duplicates.

On Cutting and Pasting: The Art and Politics of DIY Streetwear

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Now is the era of cut and paste.

On Site and Sound: Music and Borders in a DIY World

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Kita tak kenal Pancasila. Kita hanya kenal Punkasila.

Conclusion: The Indie Mainstream

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Support Your Local Brand Revolution!

Introduction: The DIY Ethos

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

First and foremost, we have here a discourse that is authoritarian: one has to express oneself, one has to speak, communicate, cooperate, and so forth.

Introduction to Subcultural Body Style

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style 2012

Book chapter

After World War II, subcultures surfaced with prominence in urban spaces within Western culture (Thompson 1998). Scholars speculate that these subcultures formed because of shared issues and common needs that set them apart from mainstream culture and society (Cohen 1955). Over time, the term “subculture” gained negative connotations for four primary reasons. First, the very term “subculture” has a prefix of “sub,” which suggests something lower or below. Second, subculture members often come fro

Subcultural Body Style History

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style 2012

Book chapter

From the time we are born, the human body is modified for physical, spiritual, psychological, social, and cultural transformations. In fact, prehistoric mummies found in recent years suggest that body practices, modifications, associated supplements, and rituals were significant in the earliest of human cultures (Winge 2003). In 1991 a frozen Stone Age male mummy was found in the Ötztal Alps. Nicknamed Ötzi, this mummy shows evidence of possibly the earliest body modifications ever discovered. Re

Subcultural Body Style and Identity

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style 2012

Book chapter

Each subculture member has individual lived body experiences, which collectively create the generalizations about the subculture’s identity. These generalizations are then further extended to collective ideas about identity regarding the individual member, the specific subculture, and the entirety of all subcultures to some degree. The subcultural body becomes an amalgam of experiences—for example, piercings, tattoos, spiky hair, and propensity toward pain. Furthermore, each subculture has unwrit

Hair

Geraldine Biddle-Perry and Sarah Cheang

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Across cultures, the symbolic and material management of hair on bodies, faces and heads is intrinsic to human adornment and hygiene, ritualized belief, and commercial enterprise. Fashions in hair can display an enormous and shifting range of aesthetic and social conventions. A wide variety of primary and secondary sources provides an overview of key debates and theories that describe, inform, and develop our understanding of the styling and management of human hair as a powerful vehicle for soci

Dress and Tourism

Derek Bryce

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Tourism is an industry of increasing global significance. With international tourist arrivals forecast to exceed 1.5 billion by 2020, it is clear that catering to such vast temporary movements of people has significant impacts on host environments and cultures. In broad terms, this industry is systemically driven to commodify entire cultures in order to render them consumable by large numbers of potential tourists. Perhaps paradoxically, the supposed cultural novelty and exoticism of a destinatio

Veblen, Thorstein

Michael Carter

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Veblen argued that a prime function of dress within the leisure class is to display the wearer’s wealth by their consumption “of valuable goods in excess of what is required for physical comfort” (p. 125). According to Veblen the most immediate form of conspicuous consumption is quantity, or the possession of items of clothing (for instance shoes or suits) far beyond the requirements of reasonable daily wear. However, dress in the leisure class is also subject to considerations of quality. Abilit

Laver, James

Michael Carter

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Laver was fascinated by the effects that the passing of time has upon people and their works. He was greatly influenced in his theory of time by a notion of zeitgeist, or “time spirit,” a concept taken from nineteenth-century German philosophy. Zeitgeist proposes the existence of a collective psychological, or spiritual, entity that imparts a distinctive pattern of aims and emphases to a culture, nation, or historical epoch. Drawing on this idea of cultural unity, Laver concluded that every aspec

Trickle-Down

Susan B. Kaiser

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Body and Beauty

Babatunde Lawal

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

As many scholars have pointed out, the body is much more than flesh, bones, and blood. Apart from defining an individual, it is socially constructed in different ways by different cultures, relating an individual to his or her habitus. As anthropologist Jean Comaroff has put it: The relationship between the human body and the social collectivity is a critical dimension of consciousness in all societies. Indeed, it is a truism that the body is the tangible form of selfhood in individual and collec

Simmel, Georg

Ulrich Lehmann

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The methodological mix of metaphysics, economics, and social theory generated for Simmel an interest in fashion, which he viewed as a theoretical and material field of investigation that offered space for emphatic, almost literary, evocations of clothing but also for a formal description of (dress) codes as visual and structural primers for social groups and settings. He began to investigate the topic in an 1895 essay titled “Zur Psychologie der Mode” (On the psychology of fashion). In this essay

Class

Elizabeth D. Lowe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

To understand the current relationships between class and dress in the United States and Canada, it is necessary to review the most important theories that have been put forth about class and dress in Western Europe. There are nearly as many opinions about the nature of class as there are people. These opinions vary widely, ranging from, “class explains everything” to “it no longer exists.” To many, social class has become just a metaphor for varied access to resources, a way to describe the unev

Trends

Maria Mackinney-Valentin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

One of the defining features of fashion can be said to be the constant change in its visual expression. The term trend is often employed to describe the motor that drives fashion; it can refer to both fashion change (innovation) and fashion adoption behavior (diffusion). A trend may involve a certain item of dress, a way of wearing an item, or a certain style, silhouette, material, color, or pattern. In fashion theory, fashion process and fashion cycle are sometimes used as synonyms for trend.

The Study of Dress and Fashion in West Europe

Lise Skov

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The dress and fashion of West Europe have been studied by many scholars. During most of the twentieth century, the analytical framework and specific subject matter were determined by disciplinary divisions. Art historians studied the development of clothing in detail; sociologists analyzed how class antagonisms were acted out in fashion; psychologists studied the fundamental motives expressed in dress; ethnologists documented different folk dress (or regional dress) traditions; semioticians read

Research Approaches

Lise Skov and Marie Riegels Melchior

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress and fashion are rich and varied fields of study. Some scholars refer to them as “hybrid subjects” because they bring together different conceptual frameworks and disciplinary approaches, including those from anthropology, art history, cultural studies, design studies, economics, history, home economics (in the early twenty-first century more likely to be known as “family and consumer studies” or “human ecology”), literature, semiotics, sociology, visual culture, and business studies. Invari

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