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Overview of the Caribbean

Steeve O. Buckridge

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Despite a shared history and similar patterns of development, the Caribbean is one of the most complex, culturally diverse regions on the globe, a result of the vast numbers of people arriving there from all over the world through the centuries. This diversity generated new cultural systems unique to the area. Consequently, the people of the Caribbean represent various ethnicities and speak several languages, from Spanish, French, Dutch, and English to indigenous and Creole tongues, including Jam

Trinidad in the Nineteenth Century

Dominique Heyse-Moore

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The nineteenth century saw great change on the island of Trinidad, particularly the end of slavery and the arrival of many groups of people from across the world. People from many parts of Africa, Europe, Asia, and other parts of the Americas (and their descendants) all lived there. There are many clear distinctions between the ways that different social and ethnic groups dressed; yet, these groups also began to influence each other’s dress and adapted to their new environment. Unfortunately, ver

Barbadian Culture and Dress

Amanda J. Muhammad

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Barbadian dress patterns, like those of so many other Caribbean island nations, are formed from the mixing of multiple cultural configurations to produce something unlike the originals: a system of communication that reflects the island’s historical perspective. This perspective is the result of historical class, gender, and race delineations, as well as contemporary group norms, as evident in dress delineations by social standing and age. Such patterns provide evidence of individual and group re

Dress and Fashion in Argentina

Laura Novik and Regina A. Root

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Argentine fashion has often been intimately connected to the workings of culture, citizenship, and social change. Whether considering the elongated tortoiseshell hair combs from the nineteenth century or recycled garments from the 1980s, analysts of the multivalent characteristics of dress in Argentina, especially in the urban environs of Buenos Aires, address a host of social and political identities as well as larger cultural processes. When a scholar of Argentine fashion is asked to discuss te

Creolized Costumes for Rara, Haiti

Susan Elizabeth Tselos

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Each spring, beginning immediately at the end of Carnaval, and building in intensity during the six weeks preceding Easter, Vodou religious temples (oumfòs) in Haiti, located on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, dispatch a procession of characters that includes captains, colonels, queens, flag-bearers, and baton-twirling jugglers called majò jonc. This procession, known as Rara, is a yearly ritual of Haiti’s urban poor and the rural peasant class. Rara exists within the culture of Vodou, a sync

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