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Alberta Ferretti

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Christian Dior Haute Couture by John Galliano, Fall/Winter 1997–1998

Waleria Dorogova

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Following his enthusiastically celebrated debut at Dior, for his second couture collection, John Galliano staged another highly theatricalized défilé in the notoriously gallant environment of the Jardin de Bagatelle. It was the first set design in a series commissioned from Michael Howells, who created complementing backdrops for Galliano’s garments and scenography. Aesthetical measures established in the first show for spring—traditional visual codes and the sartorial heritage of Christian Dior,

Martine Sitbon

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Anna Sui, Fall/Winter 1993

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

For the fall/winter 1993 season, Sui blended together fashionable elements from late eighteenth-century France to Edwardian Britain. Despite the disparate elements involved, the looks that Sui created were still in keeping with a romantic, whimsical, and feminine aesthetic. Luxurious fabrics such as velvet and satin in dark fall colors contrasted with pastel shades, and the collection contained the most colors Sui had used up to that time. She went to great lengths to dye and sometimes re-dye the

France

Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The French Revolution abolished the rigid dress etiquette and bureaucracy of the ancien régime fashion industry. Napoleon’s campaigns inspired fashions with soldierly details and created a vogue for exotic accessories. His imperial court ensured the survival of French luxury goods industries, while promoting a more modern silhouette. Napoleon encouraged pre-Revolutionary tastes for classical Greek and Roman styles, to glorify his own reign. The restoration of the Bourbon monarchy and the Romantic

Fancy Dress

Anthea Jarvis

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The morally questionable masquerade became unfashionable by 1820, but European society’s love of fancy dress continued. To accord with the new mood of decorum, fancy balls became the fashion, given either in private houses or as large-scale civic fund-raising events. Masks disappeared, and costumes were based on historical characters (many from Shakespeare’s plays or Sir Walter Scott’s novels), Turkish and Greek dress inspired by Byron’s poems, or the peasant dress of Spain, Italy, and Switzerlan

‘Freezing the Frame’: Dress and Ethnicity in Brittany and Gaelic Scotland

Malcolm Chapman

Source: Dress and Ethnicity. Change Across Space and Time 1995

Book chapter

The “traditional dress” of Highland Scotland, in this sense, is a collection of clothing for men: its essential item is the tartan kilt, with the addition of items such as knee-length woolen socks, sgiandu, and sporran. This set of garments has never been the popular dress of anyone, outside the Scottish Highland regiments of the British army, and outside self-consciously folkloric circles (dancing groups, choirs, the “White Heather Club”, and so on). The central item, however, the kilt, does ech

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