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Secular Fashion In Israel

Oz Almog

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

national dress/costumeSabraIsrael, twentieth centuryIn national images depicting the early years of the State of Israel, the word “fashion” is deliberately associated with the unkempt pioneering sabra look: khakikhaki shorts and blue shirts characteristic of the socialist youth movements, pinafores and rubashka shirts influenced by Eastern European style, Bedouin kaffiyahkaffiyahs, biblical sandals, and dome-shaped caps known as kova tembel. To a large extent, this look became Israel’s national m

How Muslim Women Dress in Israel

Oz Almog

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

Islamic/Muslim dressIn order to understand fully Muslim female dress in Israel, some basic concepts will be clarified here. Islam, like most other religions, regulates the behavior of its believers.Linda B. Arthur ed., “Introduction,” Religion, Dress and the Body, Oxford and NY: Berg, 1999, p. 1. Like other faiths, its legal code lays down rules regarding the related fields of clothing and sexuality.Steele, Valerie, Fashion and Eroticism, Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to the Ja

Feminist Ideologies in Postmodern Japanese Fashion: Rei Kawakubo Meets Marie Antoinette in Downtown Tokyo

Ory Bartal

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

In the 1970s, the modernistic social paradigm collapsed in many post-industrial countries. In Japan, it resulted in the falling apart of the homogeneous culture that hailed collectivism. Various groups began to form. In 1970s Tokyo, the Karasu-Zoku (raven tribe) emerged as a parallel to the British Punk movement. Alongside the karasu-zoku was the an-non-zoku, a young and fashionable “tribe” consisting of women who enjoyed reading the mass communicationmagazinesmagazines an-an and non-no. The idea

Ideology, Fashion and the Darlys’ “Macaroni” Prints

Peter Mcneil

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

Painted caricatures began on the “Grand TourGrand Tour” as private jokes shared between young men and their tutors. Private Italian painters working in Florence inspired the English development of this field. Etchings were made by Pier Leone Ghezzi (1674–1755) and Pietro Longhi (1702–85), and painted in Rome by English artists including Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Patch (1725–82). Horace Walpole wrote in his journal thus: “Patch was excellent in Caricatura, and was in much favour with the youn

Rabbinical Dress in Italy

Asher Salah

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

The promulgation of sumptuary laws, regulating specific items of dress that might be worn by various individuals on certain occasions, is a well-known chapter of European social history from the late Middle Ages to the eighteenth century.On Jewish sumptuary legislation in general see: Salo Wittmayer Baron, The Jewish Community: Its History and Structure to the American Revolution, 3 vols, Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 1942; Louis Finkelstein, Jewish Self-Government in the Middle Ages,

Military Dress as an Ideological Marker in Roman Palestine

Guy D. Stiebel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

Only a few instances from the Roman Empire actually provide scholars with near-complete assemblages of panoplies, and most rare of all are the remains that derived directly from conflict lands. In addition to the celebrated navy soldier from ce79 Herculaneum,R. Gore, “2000 Years of Silence: The Dead Do Tell Tales at Vesuvius,” National Geographic, 165 (1984), pp. 557–613; S. Ortisi “Pompeji und Herculaneum—Soldaten in den Vesuvsdäten,” Archäologie der Schlachtfelder—Militaria aus Zerstörungshoriz

Identity, role and the Mask

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction 2016

Book chapter

The function of a costume or mask is to “disguisedisguise, protect or transform” (Wilsher, 2007, p. 12). For superheroes, the mask serves all three of these functions. It identity constructionreligiontransforms the wearer from ordinary civilian to superhero, disguising him in order to protect the identity of his alter ego, and those he cares about. The duality of the superhero’s identity is bound up in his costume. His public face, the mask, conceals his private face, hidden underneath.

Watchmen

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction 2016

Book chapter

practicalitycapeappropriationAlan Moore, AlanMoore and Dave Gibbons, DaveGibbons’ WatchmenWatchmen (1986–1987) is a deconstruction of the superhero comic that poses the question “what if superheroes [and their costumes] were real?” (Thompson, 2005, p. 105). Such self-conscious responses to genre occur, writes Geoff Klock (2002, p. 3), when the “building density of tradition becomes anxiety.” The superhero genre has mushroomed to such proportions that it seems uncontrollable, providing audiences w

Iron Man

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction 2016

Book chapter

upgradestechnologyinsigniacivilian alter egoidentity constructionOnce a costume is established as a representation of a certain set of values and abilities, the superhero identity can become more attached to the costume than to its wearer. In the case of Iron Man, identityidentity is more bound up in the costume than with any other superhero. Indeed, Iron Man is not a man, but an augmentation.

The X-Men

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction 2016

Book chapter

identitycustomizationconformitycolorReynolds (1992, p. 26) observes that all superhero costumes function “as a uniform, binding together all super-beings.” The superhero uniformuniform asserts his readiness to perform acts of heroism, and aligns him with crime-fighting values. Costume “creates a community between its wearers” (ibid.), communicating to audiences that even the most isolated or rebellious superhero conforms to a core set of ideals that define the superhero genre. More so than other

Introduction—why write a book about sunglasses?

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

As a lecturer in visual culture in a fashion department, I had observed that sunglasses have also been remarkably resilient to changes in fashion and indeed in the sartorial languages of cool. Since sunglasses became fashionable in the early twentieth century, they have remained a powerful component of the fashionable or cool image; in fact, it seems sunglasses are almost synonymous with fashion, underscored by the iconic images of fashion elite like Anna Wintour and Karl Lagerfeld, both recogniz

Seeing the blur—perception, cool, and mechanized speed (1910–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

speedindustrialised consciousness; panoramic perception; Virilio, PaulAlthough the now-ubiquitous image of bikini, shades, and sun-lounger might suggest that the ideal wearer of sunglasses enjoys the luxury of being blissfully inert, the dynamic power, excess, and seductive glamor of men and women speeding along in shades is undeniable—from the tough sheen of Marlon Brando in The Wild Ones to twenty-first century pop acts like Britney SpearsBritney Spears in “Toxic,” where impenetrable diamond-st

Seeing the cyborg—eye-shading, cool, and the hi-tech body (1910–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Exploring speed in the last chapter has already enabled us to consider some aspects of the relationship between sunglasses and modern technologytechnology. But this relationship goes further. Sunglasses became a more general sign of encounters with the wonders and perils of modern technology; in the early days of TV advertising, sunglasses were worn by immaculate, 1950s housewives shading their eyes from the terrifying brilliance of whites achieved with innovative washing powders.

Dress, Self-Fashioning and Display at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Christine Guth

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

Isabella Stewart Gardner negotiated a prominent public position for herself in Boston through the establishment of a museum that promoted a different attitude towards art than those founded with the aim of educating the public. She assembled her collection as an individual, producing a competing, but equally ideologically motivated account of what she regarded as art. Her collection embraced the cultures of Europe and Asia, but also gave recognition to products of female craft such as lace. While

A Narrative of Jazz Modernity

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

postmodern identity, in jazzidentity(ies)postmodern in jazz“Satchmo at the Waldorf”“Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill”“Jazz Urbane”Holiday, Billie“Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill”classic jazzIn popular culture, jazz is situated in an environment beyond the 1960s stage of fusion, divergence and division, where it is now elevated, revered and presented as a nostalgic art form that conveys an ingenious past. Music scholars of the twenty-first century have applied numerous definitions to this perio

Assessing Elitism and Branding in Jazz

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

societal opposition, to jazzNew Orleansand jazzEarly on, jazz experienced modes of disdain, streaming from religious institutions, black societies and majority tradition. This conflict commenced with the intersection of gospel and secular musicsecular music. The latter was associated with music performed in saloons, nightclubs and theaters. Around the early 1900s, Du Bois, W. E. B.Du Bois explained the magnitude of segregationand the churchthe church in black communities, and the churchchurchand

Gendered Identities, Ideologies and Cultural Difference

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

sheet music coversfunctions ofperformersmarketing song titlesmusic production systemmusic industrymass-marketsmarketingby performerscommercialization, of jazzPrior to the 1920s dominance of phonograph records and radio, a dominant American aesthetic was disseminated into households via illustrated sheet music covers. These booklets contained descriptive cover art, music, lyrics, dance instructions and photographs, publicityphotographs of performers that stimulated popular interest in songwriters,

Lost in A Gaze: Young Men and Fashion in Contemporary Japan

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

‘Do you understand muslins, sir?’JaneAusten, Northanger Abbey (London: Penguin Books, 1996 [1818]), p. 22.

Introduction: Dress History Now: Terms, Themes and Tools

Charlotte Nicklas and Annebella Pollen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

Terminology is a perpetual difficulty in the study of dress history: how should ‘dress’, ‘fashion’, ‘clothing’ (or ‘clothes’) and ‘costume’ be defined and distinguished from each other? In current scholarship, how do ‘dress history’, ‘fashion history’ and ‘fashion studies’ differ? The meanings of these words and phrases overlap and interconnect, their definitions continuing to challenge researchers (Cumming 2004: 8, 15; Harte 2009: 176; Taylor 2013: 26). Joanne Eicher and Susan Kaiser both emphas

Gucci

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Costume and Character: Wearing and Being

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume 2014

Book chapter

My clothes may express the dressmaker, but they don’t express me.

The Modest Fashion Blogosphere: Establishing Reputation, Maintaining Independence

Reina Lewis

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present 2013

Book chapter

In the modest fashion sector, the division between corporate and independent can be blurred when bloggers and brands alike may regard their activities as part of a spiritual mission. Like all early fashion bloggers, the first cohort of modest fashion bloggers was initially independent, with many coming online in the same years of the mid-2000s that saw the dramatic increase in blog writing and reading (especially among women) (Pew 2005). Modest blogging spanned the gamut of emergent blog genres,

Burqinis, Bikinis and Bodies: Encounters in Public Pools in Italy and Sweden

Pia Karlsson Minganti

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The burqini is often met with resistance. Muslim women are considered to cover themselves too much. Their habits differ from ours, whether in Sweden and Italy or elsewhere in Europe. One day I experienced how this taken-for-granted assumption on European homogeneity is challenged. During a stay in Italy, I had decided to go swimming at a public swimming bath. While in the shower, washing myself before going into the pool, I noticed an information panel on the wall. It stated the regulations, incl

Film Stars as Fashion Icons

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Cinema’s new ‘celebrity’ stardom, within a Western context, is qualitatively different from previous forms of fandom or star emulation. In consequence, the existing theories of stardom (Stacey 1994; Gledhill 1991), sometimes co-opted from film studies to explain modern celebrity culture, are not really sufficient, although, as this book will suggest, Richard Dyer’s idea of ‘the ordinary’ has a new relevance in this rather different context (1978/1998). Film studies within the academy must somehow

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