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Gucci

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Burqinis, Bikinis and Bodies: Encounters in Public Pools in Italy and Sweden

Pia Karlsson Minganti

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The burqini is often met with resistance. Muslim women are considered to cover themselves too much. Their habits differ from ours, whether in Sweden and Italy or elsewhere in Europe. One day I experienced how this taken-for-granted assumption on European homogeneity is challenged. During a stay in Italy, I had decided to go swimming at a public swimming bath. While in the shower, washing myself before going into the pool, I noticed an information panel on the wall. It stated the regulations, incl

Designers and Models Become Brands

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

In 1921, Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel launched one of the most successful scents of all time (Groom 1997: 21). The iconic oblong bottle for Chanel No. 5, still revered, was carefully designed to her own very strict specifications, and she selected its contents from several versions created by parfumier Ernest Béaux (Charles-Roux 2009). Meanwhile, once established as a designer, she herself also became a fashion leader; she was constantly photographed and always mindful of publicity, whether it was in

Film Stars as Fashion Icons

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Cinema’s new ‘celebrity’ stardom, within a Western context, is qualitatively different from previous forms of fandom or star emulation. In consequence, the existing theories of stardom (Stacey 1994; Gledhill 1991), sometimes co-opted from film studies to explain modern celebrity culture, are not really sufficient, although, as this book will suggest, Richard Dyer’s idea of ‘the ordinary’ has a new relevance in this rather different context (1978/1998). Film studies within the academy must somehow

Changes in Cinematic Culture: Some Celebrity Cover Girls

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Some of the films made by the new celebrity stars may not actually be seen by their fans; they will, however, have seen stills in magazines or on the Internet. When their films are commercially successful, the image of the star seen on screen often matches their most popular off-screen image. Jennifer Aniston in Marley and Me, made in 2009 and more successful at the box office than her previous string of romantic comedies, looks exactly like the off-screen Jennifer Aniston, so often photographed

‘Fashion Films’: From Prêt-à-Porter to A Single Man

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

–Hugo Grumbar, head of Icon Distribution in the United Kingdom (Clark 2010: 9)Tom Ford has a huge loyal following. Any Vogue reader, GQ, Elle, Vanity Fair … they all know who he is, and there’s always hot anticipation for the next thing he does. I thought he was very marketable.

Cosmetics and Beauty Culture in Australia

Jennifer Craik

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Cosmetics and beauty culture are forms of body modification that have a place in the language of all cultures of fashion and dress. Australia has both indigenous and European traditions of body modification and aesthetics. In precontact times indigenous traditions were centrally connected with ritualistic practices, but they were also about making the body attractive. After European settlement colonists largely followed the cosmetic practices and beauty cultures of Europe and America. Among Europ

The Rituals and Metaphors of Dressing

Leopoldina Fortunati

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A case study in Italy examined ritual habits connected to dressing, the gestures of fashion, and the main metaphors of dressing within a sample of four hundred respondents. In particular, three habits are important with regard to the structure of the daily ritualization of fashion and dressing: when people dress, how many times they change their clothes, and whether they dress differently at home compared to when they go out. Regarding the gestures of fashion, the study explored people’s preferen

Conventional Work Dress

Colleen Gau

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Historically, climate and work environments are primary to the selection and production of work clothing, but safety concerns, economic and business climates, fashion, and ethics find a place in the clothing narrative of Western civilizations. As crops and animals were domesticated, empires emerged in the Nile and Mediterranean regions, and the classification of skill groups became more distinct. Animal skins were replaced by woven garments by the time people had settled into communities. Herding

Fashion, Dress, and Interior Spaces

Peter McNeil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Clothes are animated by bodies moving in space, and attitudes toward work and leisure that have changed dramatically across culture and time. In early modern Europe until the eighteenth century, sumptuary laws extended well beyond dress to even the type of finish and materials used in interior design. Other societies, including China and Thailand, continuously attempted to control these appearances. In England in the post-Restoration decades, very wealthy women exhibited new independence in the d

Gender

Susan O. Michelman and Kimberly Miller-Spillman

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Gender remains the basic distinction in dress, currently and historically, in American and Canadian society. Masculinity or femininity is reflected in the presentation of dress by the individual and is categorically interpreted by others according to societal norms. Gender is determined psychologically, socially, and culturally and refers to acceptable behavior and dress for males and females. Gender, and by extension dress, is a social and cultural construction. Viewing gender as a fluid concept

Dress and Art: Western

Sandra L. Rosenbaum

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Images of people wearing clothing create an obvious connection between dress and art. Because relatively few examples of historic garments survive, these images document the history of dress. Historically, those sitting for portraits chose their dress to project a specific image; the artist was responsible for conveying messages encoded in dress, meticulously reproducing them. Ann Rosalind Jones and Peter Stallybrass have commented that Renaissance clothes were perceived as material forms of pers

Biographies in Dress

Emma Tarlo

Source: Visibly Muslim. Fashion, Politics, Faith 4th Edition 2010

Book chapter

Rezia Wahid’s biography demonstrates the breadth and combination of ideological, sensual and visual resources on which she has drawn in the development of her personal aesthetic in dress and textile art. It is an aesthetic born chiefly out of the creative interplay of distant memories of Bangladesh and concrete experiences of Britain and Islam.

Hair, Gender and Looking

Geraldine Biddle-Perry

Source: Hair. Styling, Culture and Fashion 2008

Book chapter

Across cultures, hair is one of the most powerful symbols of our individual and collective identities. But historically and culturally it is arguably the sight of hair that makes its styling, cutting and dressing significant. Hair is our unique ‘species signal’ that in prehistory made us ‘visible from afar…. our great bushy heads on top of our smooth naked bodies identified us immediately as human. Our extravagant tresses were carried like a flag’ (Morris 1987: 21). The human species continue to

Fashionable Hair in the Eighteenth Century: Theatricality and Display

Louisa Cross

Source: Hair. Styling, Culture and Fashion 2008

Book chapter

In the eighteenth century, it was not enough just to be seen to be conspicuously in fashion, it was important to be seen to be fashionable in spectacular style. Changing or accessorizing hairstyles was a more economical way of keeping in the fashion than buying material to make up new items of clothing. For women, this brought about great fluctuation in the heights and variety of hair dressing and its display. There were some high styles at the beginning of the century such as the ‘fontange’ wher

Looking in the Mirror: Seeing and Being Seen

Sophie Woodward

Source: Why Women Wear What They Wear 2007

Book chapter

All the women I worked with wanted to appear as if they had not made an effort. Even Vivienne, who was discussed in chapter 4, a woman whose approach to her appearance was clearly idiosyncratic, is an example of this trend whereby women adopt a rhetoric of authenticity, stating they don’t want to look ‘made-up’, ‘fake’ or ‘not like me’. Despite having this attitude, every one of these women was engaged in the act of constructing her appearance, whether it was by having her hair cut in a particula

Clothes Make the Man

Susan Vincent

Source: Dressing the Elite. Dressing the Elite Clothes in Early Modern England 2003

Book chapter

Phineas Pett (Figure 6), eventually to become a master shipbuilder and naval commissioner, described his strategy for advancing his fortunes. As a young man in dire financial straits he was yet ‘contented to take any pains to get something to apparel myself, which by God’s blessing I performed before Easter next after, and that in very good fashion, always endeavouring to keep company with men of good rank far better than myself’.The Autobiography of Phineas Pett, ed. by E.G.Perrin, Navy Records

Representing Authority: New Forms of Official Identity

Richard Wrigley

Source: The Politics of Appearances. Representations Of Dress In Revolutionary France 2002

Book chapter

The earliest days of the Revolution had seen the creation of the National Guard, an institution whose adoption of a uniform corresponded to the expression of a newly forged patriotic unity. To some extent, this proved to be a relatively uncontentious phenomenon in so far as the creation of a uniform was consistent with the essentially military nature of the Guard. Uniforms were, however, strongly associated with hierarchy. In the case of the Guard, this related to the social status of its members

Mistaken Identities: Disguise, Surveillance, and the Legibility of Appearances

Richard Wrigley

Source: The Politics of Appearances. Representations Of Dress In Revolutionary France 2002

Book chapter

Introduction

Maura Banim, Eileen Green and Ali Guy

Source: Through the Wardrobe. Women’s Relationships with Their Clothes 2001

Book chapter

‘Clothed bodies are tools of self-management.’ Craik (1994, p. 46)

Choosing an Image: Exploring Women’s Images through the Personal Shopper

Kate Gillen

Source: Through the Wardrobe. Women’s Relationships with Their Clothes 2001

Book chapter

Recently, televised ‘makeovers’ – in which a member of the public is plucked from obscurity and transformed, by virtue of clever hair, make-up and style consultants, into a glamorous creature – have become popular. Makeovers have now become almost ubiquitous, with a rash of television programmes portraying the results of makeovers not only on a person’s appearance, but also on their homes, gardens and even their cooking skills. Documentaries that follow the progress of raw recruits into shining p

Suiting Ourselves: Women Professors Using Clothes to Signal Authority, Belonging and Personal Style

Eileen Green

Source: Through the Wardrobe. Women’s Relationships with Their Clothes 2001

Book chapter

She can already picture herself (new dress? dark green? summer jewelry?) ascending the three or four steps to the platform, arranging her notes on the lecturn, clearing her throat, glancing at her watch. A serious professional woman . . . (Shields, R., 1992, p. 351)

Minding Appearances in Female Academic Culture

Susan Kaiser, Joan Chandler and Tania Hammidi

Source: Through the Wardrobe. Women’s Relationships with Their Clothes 2001

Book chapter

‘So, in the words of Immanuel Kant, an enlightened philosopher, a woman who thinks might as well wear a beard.’ (Ruddick, 1996)

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