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Maurizio Baldassari

Katy Conover

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Ethnicity and the Catwalk

Melissa Marra-Alvarez

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Fashion models possess an enduring appeal that impacts on both the world of fashion and society in general. Consequently, the lack of diversity on the catwalk in recent years has come to the fore of popular conscience. Some fashion scholars have argued that modeling practices may serve to shape our understanding and ways of seeing identity, including those based on ethnicity. Focusing on the latter half of the twentieth century, the emergence of “ethnic” models in fashion is described, examining

Paris

Alexis Romano

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Paris was a fashion city from the mid-nineteenth century, when the French fashion system began to function outside of medieval guilds, corporations, and the royal courts. The article first discusses the establishment of haute couture, and explores trade syndicates, the Sentier garment district, department stores, and expositions. A second section focuses on the twentieth century and the couturiers and designers who worked in Paris, and also questions the construction of Paris in the fashion media

Covering Up on the Prairies: Perceptions of Muslim Identity, Multiculturalism and Security in Canada

A. Brenda Anderson and F. Volker Greifenhagen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The Canadian mediaOur analysis is restricted to the English-language media and does not include French Canadian publications. tend to portray headcovering as a practice that is forced on women; one can never assume that it is the women’s free choice.For example, ‘The majority of women wearing face coverings are not doing so because of free will; they are doing so because some Neanderthal husband or cleric has told them it is necessary’ (Martinuk 2011; see also Bramham 2010; Kay 2010). According t

‘I Love My Prophet’: Religious Taste, Consumption and Distinction in Berlin

Synnøve Bendixsen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The majority of mosque associations and prayer rooms in Berlin were established by the so-called first-generation migrants who arrived as guest workers in Germany in the late 1960s and early 1970s. These religious organizations and places are mostly divided along ethno-national lines in terms of their participants, language of instruction and religious references. In contrast, the religious youth organization MJD was established in 1994 by eight young Muslims with various ethnic and national back

Miss Headscarf: Islamic Fashion and the Danish Media

Connie Carøe Christiansen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Whilst cultural commentators tended to downplay the aesthetic potential of the headscarf, contestants were generally more sensitive to its potential both as an item of fashion and self-cultivation. They were also conscious of the need to challenge perceptions of Muslim women through their appearance. In several of the Danish newspaper articles which featured the contest, young Muslim women in Denmark were given the opportunity to speak and to present another angle on the headscarf to that usually

Closet Tales from a Turkish Cultural Center in the ‘Petro Metro’, Houston, Texas

Maria Curtis

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The Turquoise Center, or the Turkish Cultural Center as it is commonly called, consists of the Raindrop Turkish House and the Istanbul Conference Center (Figure 7.2). It reaches out to Turkish Americans, American converts and anyone interested in learning about Turkey. Raindrop Turkish House estimates Turks constitute 6,000 of Houston’s 250,000 Muslims. Whereas some of them came decades ago and have lived mainly secular lifestyles, younger practising women have often come to Houston with a well-d

Perspectives on Muslim Dress in Poland: A Tatar View

Katarzyna Górak-Sosnowska and Michał Łyszczarz

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Numbering around 3,000–5,000 people, Tatars constitute one of the smallest ethnic groups in Poland. Centuries of living in a mainstream Polish and Catholic society and being isolated from any other Tatar or Muslim population resulted in their losing a lot of their cultural heritage. However, it was not so much the pressure from the outside world as the willingness of Tatars to integrate, or even assimilate, that has informed Tatar clothing choices. Historically, soon after reaching Lithuania and

Hijab on the Shop Floor: Muslims in Fashion Retail in Britain

Reina Lewis

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

UK employment law has shifted in recent years from equal opportunities legislation which outlawed discrimination on the grounds of race and ethnicity to new policies concerned more broadly with diversity. In 2003, the UK Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations brought the United Kingdom in line with the European Employment Equality Directive of 2000, extending legal protection to cover discrimination ‘on the grounds of perceived as well as actual religion or belief’.

Burqinis, Bikinis and Bodies: Encounters in Public Pools in Italy and Sweden

Pia Karlsson Minganti

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The burqini is often met with resistance. Muslim women are considered to cover themselves too much. Their habits differ from ours, whether in Sweden and Italy or elsewhere in Europe. One day I experienced how this taken-for-granted assumption on European homogeneity is challenged. During a stay in Italy, I had decided to go swimming at a public swimming bath. While in the shower, washing myself before going into the pool, I noticed an information panel on the wall. It stated the regulations, incl

Fashion and Its Discontents: The Aesthetics of Covering in the Netherlands

Annelies Moors

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

A convenient starting point to discuss the fashion-Islam nexus is the eight-page article ‘Hip with the Headscarf’. Appearing in 1999 in the weekend magazine of an upscale Dutch daily, Volkskrant Magazine, this article started with the observation that ‘more and more women with headscarves wear fashionable styles of dress and lots of make-up’ (Jungschleger and Riemersma 1999). Next to portraying a number of young women wearing such fashionable styles, it also presented the points of view of ‘expe

Mediating Islamic Looks

Degla Salim

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The field of fashion is an industry of images (McRobbie 1998: 172). Imagery dominates the industry to such a degree that the distinction between what is really being sold, the garment or the image of the garment, has become increasingly blurry (cf. Baudrillard 1975).The image of the garment is here referred to in a double sense. Image is meant to be regarded as both a consumable photograph of the clothes and as a social ‘image’, an aura that the garment carries. When it comes to understanding the

The Clothing Dilemmas of Transylvanian Muslim Converts

Daniela Stoica

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The Transylvanian city of Cluj-Napoca has lost much of the visual uniformity that dominated it during the socialist and immediate post-socialist periods. With elegant or bohemian cafeterias, stylish dining rooms and clubs, it has become a setting that stands in sharp contrast to the uniform socialist neighbourhoods created under communism. At the beginning of the summer, when the Transylvania International Film Festival animates the city with a young and diverse public, and at the beginning of au

Landscapes of Attraction and Rejection: South Asian Aestheticsin Islamic Fashion in London

Emma Tarlo

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The most obvious feature of dress is its proximity to the body and the intimacy of our relationship to it. Whilst sociologists of the wardrobe rightly remind us that some clothing remains forever unworn or may be kept only for special occasions, it is nonetheless true that it is through being worn that dress springs into life and attains its primary purpose. This intimate relationship between our bodies and our clothes is not, however, without potential conflict. Bodies animate clothes, but they

‘Fashion Is the Biggest Oxymoron in My Life’: Fashion Blogger, Designer and Cover Girl Zinah Nur Sharif in Conversation with Emma Tarlo

Emma Tarlo and Annelies Moors (eds)

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Edited version of an interview conducted over email by Emma Tarlo in October 2012.

Made in France: Islamic Fashion Companies on Display

Leila Karin Österlind

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The fashion retailing company Amal-mode has two shops in the outskirts of Paris.The two shops are situated in Saint-Denis and Sarcelles. In the bazaar, it had chosen to separate its goods into three categories, each with their own stand. At one of these stands, only festive dress was sold. Items of more modest dress such as jilbabs, abayas, Jilbabs and abayas are both full-length outer garments, somewhat similar to kaftans.khimarsLong, modest headscarf model that covers the shoulders and sometime

Introduction to Subcultural Body Style

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style 2012

Book chapter

After World War II, subcultures surfaced with prominence in urban spaces within Western culture (Thompson 1998). Scholars speculate that these subcultures formed because of shared issues and common needs that set them apart from mainstream culture and society (Cohen 1955). Over time, the term “subculture” gained negative connotations for four primary reasons. First, the very term “subculture” has a prefix of “sub,” which suggests something lower or below. Second, subculture members often come fro

Subcultural Body Style History

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style 2012

Book chapter

From the time we are born, the human body is modified for physical, spiritual, psychological, social, and cultural transformations. In fact, prehistoric mummies found in recent years suggest that body practices, modifications, associated supplements, and rituals were significant in the earliest of human cultures (Winge 2003). In 1991 a frozen Stone Age male mummy was found in the Ötztal Alps. Nicknamed Ötzi, this mummy shows evidence of possibly the earliest body modifications ever discovered. Re

Subcultural Body Style and Identity

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style 2012

Book chapter

Each subculture member has individual lived body experiences, which collectively create the generalizations about the subculture’s identity. These generalizations are then further extended to collective ideas about identity regarding the individual member, the specific subculture, and the entirety of all subcultures to some degree. The subcultural body becomes an amalgam of experiences—for example, piercings, tattoos, spiky hair, and propensity toward pain. Furthermore, each subculture has unwrit

Subcultural Body Style

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style 2012

Book chapter

While it may seem contrary to the individualistic nature of subcultures, these groups have style guidelines expected by members. Subcultural groups subtly and visually communicate acceptable dress and styles to current and future members, as well as to outsiders and posers (i.e., individuals who purposefully mimic subcultural dress). Accordingly, Ted Polhemus and Lynn Proctor (1978) state: The dress code of a social group prescribes limits, not absolute uniformity. To suggest that social identity

Future of Subcultural Body Style

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style 2012

Book chapter

Many Western subcultures contribute to and influence contemporary examples of fashion. The Hippie subculture influenced numerous fashion trends, such as embroidered jeans, shawls, and use of the peace symbol. The Punk subculture is credited with many 1980s fashion trends, such as distressed jeans, safety pin accessories, and band buttons or pins. During the past few decades, the Urban Tribal movement influenced contemporary body fashions with the use and display of body modifications, technologie

As the chapters in this volume show, at the current conjuncture, an astonishing number of people in a striking number of cultural contexts have come to deploy jeans as a symbol of movement between social worlds and boundary crossing – be it generation, gender, culture, religion or class-inflected boundary crossing. In a world characterized by intensifying exchange and transposable goods, produced by the now ‘virtually universal intersection of (cultural) structures’, blue jeans seem to epitomize

The Limits of Jeans in Kannur, Kerala

Daniel Miller

Source: Global Denim 2011

Book chapter

Within the context of a study of global denim, South Asia is significant in representing perhaps the only remaining major region of the world where the wearing of jeans remains relatively uncommon. No one place can stand for South Asia, but an advantage of Kannur, a town in northern Kerala, is that at least for that state, it represents in the minds of its inhabitants, a clear position midway between the cosmopolitanism of the metropolis and the conservatism of the countryside. As such, many peop

Clothes and Cultural Identities: Music, Ethnicity and Nation

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion and Music 2011

Book chapter

Martin Stokes contends that music has provided a means by which individuals and communities come to understand themselves in relation to other groups with whom they contrast themselves, thus establishing the ‘difference between’. Therefore, he argues that ‘music is socially meaningful not entirely, but largely because it provides means by which people recognise identities and places and the boundaries which separate them’ (Stokes 1994: 5).

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