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Accessorizing the Figure

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The classic look is one that always passes the test of time. Classic accessories look good one season after the other and one decade after the other. The fashion figure might wear pearls, bangles, espadrilles, hair bows, lizard belts, pumps, shoulder bags, or gloves. These classic accessories are never really “in” or “out” of fashion. In the 1950s and 1960s, Mainbocher, in his couture collections, and Anne Klein, in her sportswear collections, often used classic accessories. At present, Ralph Lau

Introduction: Fashion and Cultural Memory

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It is only through our ability to remember that we experience “being/becoming (in time)being” or “becoming” in time, experiences through which we develop a sense of selfsense of self in time and place and in relation to others (see Olick, Vinitzky-Seroussi and Levi 2011: 37). Or in other words, the activating, sharing and shaping of memories together with others is crucial to the formation of identities, the generation of social relations/social relationshipssocial relationships and our experienc

Vintage: Fashioning Time

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

vintage clothesAn early usage of the word vintage in the context of clothing can be found in American Vogue (magazine)Vogue. In the rubric “Smart Fashions for Limited Incomes” in the September 1913 issue, the writer offers “Several Ruses for Disguising the Vintage of Last Year’s Wardrobe,” to make an up-to-date appearance with clothes that survive from past seasons. This includes hands-on advice on updating the “tailoringtailor suit of last year’s vintage” with a “new, upsloping belt” so the suit

Vintage Style and Mediated Memories: Sixties DIY

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

original clothes from the sixtiesIn spite of the importance attributed to old, original second-hand clothes, it is not the case that all clothes worn by sixties stylers are actual survivors from the 1960s. A restriction to old clothes would lead to a rather reduced wardrobe, since not all clothes desired are available any longer—or may have ever existed in the past. The rarityrarity of old clothes that fit with the current tastetastes and contemporary interest in sixties style makes it essential

Un/Timely Fashion

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Historical Influences on Contemporary Fashion Design

Lorynn Divita

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion designers regularly draw inspiration from historical influences, which they appropriate and reinterpret for the modern consumer, often while making a deeper commentary about the current era by referencing the ideals of the past. Theoretical concepts such as Nystrom’s Zeitgeist and Laver’s Law, which demonstrate society’s “gap in appreciation” of fashion styles, enable fashion observers to more accurately interpret the statement a designer is making through retro fashions. Two collections

Secondhand Clothing

Heike Jenss

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The term secondhand clothing connotes garments that enter a second or new circle of use after they have been worn or used by a previous owner. The handing down, sale, and reuse of previously worn garments have been common practices throughout the history of dress. Even into the twentieth century, garments were expensive goods and often a family investment that was passed on to the next generation or traded and exchanged for other goods. With the wider accessibility of fashion and the acceleration

Hippie Style

Joel Lobenthal

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The hippies built on the generic silhouettes that prevailed during the 1960s—the miniskirt, the pantsuit—but they transmogrified Mod fashion at the decade’s midpoint by the way they put their clothes together, by their choices of fabric, and by the way they accessorized. Folkloric motifs, style, and fabrics were ubiquitous in hippie fashion. Their adoption of long peasant skirts helped move fashion back to longer hemlines. The generally loose and unconstructed silhouette of the 1960s became even

Retro Styles

Marylou Luther

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

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Vintage Dress

Maria Mackinney-Valentin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The term vintage generally refers to the revived use of certain secondhand clothes, shoes, and accessories primarily originating from the twentieth century. From being a subcultural phenomenon in the mid-1990s, vintage became a mainstream trend in Euro-American markets around the beginning of the twenty-first century. Vintage can be seen as a paradoxical fashion phenomenon in the sense that it assumes durable qualities similar to those of vintage cars and wine, while fashion is often defined by t

Jeans

Clare Sauro

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The first true “jeans” were created in 1873 by Jacob Davis, a Nevada tailor, who went in with Levi Strauss, a San Francisco merchant, for the patent. The pair received a patent for the addition of copper rivets at the pocket joinings of work pants to prevent tearing—a boon to the many California miners and laborers. The first jeans Levi-Strauss and Co. produced were available in brown cotton duck and blue denim and were known as waist overalls (the name jeans not adopted until the mid-1900s). In

Sixties Dress Only! The Consumption of the Past in a Retro Scene

Heike Jenß

Source: Old Clothes, New Looks. Second Hand Fashion, 2005, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It is reasonably easy and affordable to recreate a nice 60s look 30 years later. A well stocked wardrobe should have a mix of current items and retro items that can be worn together. For a proper 60s look, vintage dresses are the best …

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