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Overview of Korea: Traditional

Lee Kyung Ja

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The basic styles of hanbok, or Korean traditional dress, were established at a very early date and have remained essentially unchanged to the present day. The styles developed among steppe nomadic cultures and were introduced to the Korean peninsula probably during the first century b.c.e. Mural paintings from the walls of Goguryeo kingdom (37 b.c.e. to 668 c.e.) tombs dating from the late fourth to the sixth centuries c.e. show clearly the early forms of male and female dress: Men wear baji, or

Textile Manufacture in Korea

Juyeon Park, Marilyn DeLong and Eunah Yoh

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the twenty-first century, Korea’s textilemanufacture is known for two distinctive features: One is exquisite textile art products, such as sumptuous embroidery, delicate hanbok (a general term for traditional Korean dress for both men and women) designs, and luxurious fabrics; and the other is the country’s rapid economic development, particularly in the second half of the twentieth century. The origins of both features of textile manufacture may be found in five thousand years of Korean histo

Archaeological Evidence: Korea

Seongsil Park

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Paleolithic period people settled in the Korean Peninsula 40,000 to 50,000 years ago. The relationship of these peoples to contemporary Korean populations is unknown. Between 6,000 and 2,000 years ago, Neolithic migrations from Northeast Asia, Siberia, and Central Asia brought new populations to Korea. Chulmun, or “comb-marked,” pottery people, left evidence of sewing tools in the form of bone needles and a variety of shell disks and beads, although no garments have been recovered that date from

Historical Evidence: Korea

Seongsil Park

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Chinese neo-Confucianism was adopted by Emperor Taejo (1335–1408), the founder of the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910). Society, including dress, was carefully regulated. Members of the court were classified into nine ranks. Gwanbok, or official dress, included separate wardrobes for court ceremonials, religious rites, and official and ordinary work, and there were rigorous sumptuary laws. In addition to pictorial and written documentation, there are numerous examples of garments and accessories as evi

Korean Wedding Dress from the Chosun Dynasty (1392–1910) to the Present

Na Young Hong

Source: Wedding Dress Across Cultures 2003

Book chapter

During the Chosun dynasty, matchmakers arranged marriages. When both families agreed, a letter which contained the year, month, date, and hour of a prospective groom’s birth was sent to the bride’s family. The acceptance of the letter by the bride’s family officially sealed the engagement and the groom and the bride became betrothed without knowing each other. The bride’s parents used the letter to consult horoscopes in order to predict the harmony between the couple and, if auspicious, set a wed

Confucianism Manifested in Korean Dress from the Sixteenth to Seventeenth Centuries

Inwoo Chang and Haekyung L. Yu

Source: Undressing Religion. Commitment and Conversion from a Cross-Cultural Perspective 2000

Book chapter

The basic garments in Korean traditional dress consist of two pieces, a top and a bottom. The top is a caftan-style jacket or blouse called jogori. Both men and women wear jogori regardless of age and socio-economic status. With jogori men wear pants called baji, and women wear skirts called chima. On top of these basic garments, people can wear a variety of po (coat or robe-type outer wear) depending on the weather and occasion. In addition to these basic garments, there are several important ce

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