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Beldi Sells: The Commodification of Moroccan Fashion

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Modern Fashion Traditions. Negotiating Tradition and Modernity through Fashion, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Angela Jansen offers an analysis of contemporary Moroccan fashion known as beldi which has simultaneously achieved commercial success while promoting a new sense of national identity. The term, beldi, which means ‘traditional/local/authentic’ in Moroccan Arabic, encompasses both recognition as a brand as well as shorthand for the desire of Moroccan people for authenticity, craftsmanship and national glory. As such, beldi has been a success story as to how contemporary fashion can both reference t

Travelling the Street Style Blogosphere: Amateur Anthropology from Around the Globe

Brent Luvaas

Source: Street Style. An Ethnography of Fashion Blogging, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

‘People urban cosmopolitanism of Helsinki (Finland)Karjalainen, SampoHel Looks (blog)Helsinki (Finland)urban cosmopolitanism ofHelsinki (Finland)punk rocker culture inHelsinki (Finland)watching has always been my obsession and my hobby’, Liisa Jokinen told me, as we chatted in June of 2012 via the voice-over-internet protocol of Skype. ‘I’ve always been interested in peoples’ clothes, why [they] wear certain things, and the reason behind their outfits, what kinds of stories [go into them]. So it

History, Art, and Plastic Bags: Viewing South Africa Through Fashion

Victoria L. Rovine

Source: Modern Fashion Traditions. Negotiating Tradition and Modernity through Fashion, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Victoria Rovine develops a fascinating reflection as to how a prosaic global commodity, namely, the ubiquitous plastic bag, has become a fashion icon in South Africa. Labelled as ‘China bags’ (reflecting their country of manufacture), Rovine explores the collections of two South African fashion designers who base their work around the potential of these plastic containers. They have transformed the global bag into a distinctively local fashion icon as a symbol of the mixed messages of postmoderni

Retailing in Multinational Markets

Brenda Sternquist and Elizabeth B. Goldsmith

Source: International Retailing, 3rd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

The Middle East and Africa

Brenda Sternquist and Elizabeth B. Goldsmith

Source: International Retailing, 3rd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After reading this chapter, you should be able to:

Introduction

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

I once asked my father if it became compulsory for all men to wear flared trousers, what would he do? He replied, “Go in the nuddy [nude]”. I laughed at his response, thinking he was just old fashioned. I must have been about eleven or twelve and my idea of a well-dressed man came in the form of Jimi Hendrix who reigned supreme in such pants. This was the period of revolutionary dress for the young.

You Should Understand, It’s A Freedom Thing: The Stoned Cherrie–Steve Biko T-Shirt

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In the face you can have all kinds of political landscapes

The Global Footwear Trade

Fiona Armstrong-Gibbs and Tamsin McLaren

Source: Marketing Fashion Footwear. The Business of Shoes, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Over the past twenty years, the developed world has rapidly increased its consumption of footwear. In order to fulfill Western appetites for more fashion at a cheaper price, this demand led to sourcing further afield to countries in the developing world. Footwear is not a straightforward product to make; it is labor intensive, and where there are large pools of willing workers, its production will thrive. Today’s sourcing strategies coupled with the rapid growth of consumerism through the retail

Theoretical Perspective of Global Sourcing

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The five key theories are discussed to explain international trade: (1) the law of supply and demand in international trade, (2) comparative advantage theory, (3) competitive advantage theory of nations, (4) fragmentation theory, and (5) industry life cycle theory.

Ideals for Individual Appearance and the Art of Dress

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Dress and the Arts

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Imperial Sociocultural Systems and Dress

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Introduction

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It is only in the past fifteen years that ‘fashion of traditional dress’ gained the attention of social scientists, simply because it was considered a contradictio in terminis. It was probably John Flügel (1950 [1930]: 129–30) who set the trend in the 1930s by introducing his dichotomy ‘fixed’ versus ‘modish’ costume, whereby ‘fixed costume changes slowly in time, and its whole value depends, to some extent, upon its permanence’. Modish costume, on the other hand, he explains, ‘changes very rapid

Moroccan Fashion as Tradition

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, there have been a number of political events that have had an important impact on the development of Moroccan fashion. Under the French FrenchProtectorateProtectorate, for example, it was decided to separate the new European city centres from the indigenousindigenous Arab city centres. This resulted in a cultural buffer against French cultural influences, allowing the continuity of a Moroccan lifestylelifestyle. Over time, this led to two more

Three Generations of Moroccan Fashion Designers

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The first generation of Moroccan fashion designers consisted of women of the Moroccan élite with no formal training in fashion design. They merely had the advantage of growing up with the luxuryluxury of high-quality craftsmanshipcraftsmanship and learned to sow and embroider at a young age, since this was considered an important part of their privileged educationeducation.Personal communication Tamy Tazi (fashion designer), July 9, 2004. They were ‘products’ of the nationalist movement in that t

Moroccan Lifestyle Media

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

As was discussed in Chapter 2, the Moroccan nationalist movementnationalist movement brought, among other things, tremendous changes in the lives, consciousness and ambitionambitions of Moroccan women by the middle of the twentieth century. More women were enjoying an educationeducation and soon they discovered the impact the written word could have on their cause. Therefore a first generation of Moroccan women’s magazines introduced in the 1960s were all run by renowned feminists and had a stron

The Impact of Foreign Fashion Brands

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

What is a fashion industry? The way Welters and Lillethun (2001: xxix) describe it, a fashion industry requires several components such as: a market economy that provides wealth; adequate technology to make apparelapparel items; a distribution system that disseminates ideas about fashion as well as the products themselves; and a system democratizationof fashionof fashion innovation and adoption. Also, they say, a fashion industry is dependent on a rapidly changing infrastructure influenced by art

The Consumption of Moroccan Fashion

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Dress is more than the clothes we put on our bodies. As Ruth Barnes and Joanne Eicher (1992: 15) formulate it, it is everything that a person does to or puts on one’s own body, including perfume, make-up, tattoos, hair extensions, etc. as well as the phenomena of anorexia, bulimia, plastic surgery, etc. ‘Dress is the sum of bodybody bodymodificationsmodifications and/or supplements displayed by a person in communicating with the other’ (1992: 15). For example, a Moroccan woman can wear a modest j

Conclusion

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The main aim of this research has been to analyse Moroccan fashion as a materialization of social, cultural, political, economic and religious developments in Moroccan society, because until now Moroccan fashion has been predominantly studied as physical objects in which the materials and construction of the garments have been given primacy over their social and cultural meanings. Simultaneously, this research has aimed to contest prevailing misconceptions concerning traditional dress as being st

African Influences in European Fashion Design

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Since the late nineteenth century, European fashion design has been lured by the exotic “otherness” of Africa as a source of creative inspiration and exotic raw materials, such as ivory and tropical woods, for use in luxury consumer goods. The more recent stylistic appropriation, since the 1970s, of African motifs, patterns, and color combinations has became increasingly prominent in European fashion and needs to be understood as part of the industry’s continual cross-cultural pursuit of innovati

Chloé

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

The Empress’s Old Clothes: Biographies of African Dress at the Victoria And Albert Museum

Nicola Stylianou

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

On 20 April 1869 the V&A accessioned a number of objects from Ethiopia including clothes and jewellery that were listed in the museum register as having been given to the museum by the ‘Secretary of State for India’ and ‘belonging formerly to the Queen of Abyssinia’ (V&A 1869). At this time the V&A had not yet been divided into departments with objects being accepted for inclusion in the museum on the grounds of design excellence or as demonstrations of particular techniques. Included in this gif

The Ancient Middle East, c. 3500–600 BCE

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

The Ancient Middle East c. 3500 – 600 BCE

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

One of the most outstanding aspects of Egyptian civilization is the relative slowness with which changes occurred. It is not that there were no significant changes in the 3,000 years during which this civilization existed, but they took place so gradually that they seemed almost imperceptible, even over several hundred years. For almost 3,000 years, Egyptian civilization was scarcely affected by foreign cultural and political influences. According to historian Fairservis (1962), “Between the Egy

Yoruba in Nigeria and Diaspora

Rowland Abiodun

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The Yoruba people number well over thirty million from about sixteen ancient kingdoms. They spread all over southwestern Nigeria and extend well into the neighboring countries of Benin and Togo. The Yoruba have been urbanized since the first millennium c.e. and are well known for their fine artistic achievements, especially the naturalistic life-size bronze heads and terra-cotta sculptures of Ile-Ife. In addition to being among the most accomplished carvers in wood and ivory in Africa, the Yoruba

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