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Grace Jones

Shayla Corinne Black

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Born in 1948 in Spanish Town, Jamaica, Grace Jones’s whimsical career began as a model, where she was a brash addition to international designers Yves Saint Laurent, Claude Montana, and Kenzo Takada. Grace Jones obliterated all boundaries with her incorporation of gender-bending fashions, notorious buzz-cut hairstyle, and her determination to don original and outrageous styles. Artists like Lady Gaga, Nicki Minaj, and Rihanna have all paid homage to Jones for her exuberance and eccentricity, whic

Fashion and Its Discontents: The Aesthetics of Covering in the Netherlands

Annelies Moors

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

A convenient starting point to discuss the fashion-Islam nexus is the eight-page article ‘Hip with the Headscarf’. Appearing in 1999 in the weekend magazine of an upscale Dutch daily, Volkskrant Magazine, this article started with the observation that ‘more and more women with headscarves wear fashionable styles of dress and lots of make-up’ (Jungschleger and Riemersma 1999). Next to portraying a number of young women wearing such fashionable styles, it also presented the points of view of ‘expe

The Genealogy of the Turkish Pardösü in the Netherlands

R. Arzu Ünal

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Three-quarter-length overcoats were the most commonly worn outdoor attire mentioned in the accounts of migrant women coming to the Netherlands in the late 1970s. A few Turkish women came alone as workers;most of them were the wives of guest workers and came as temporary residents. The first generation of migrant women described that particular style of overcoat as the first modern and şehirli(urban) item of outdoor clothing they had ever worn. These were relatively close-fitting overcoats, intend

Caribbean Islanders

José F. Blanco

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Caribbean immigrants have contributed greatly to the multicultural and multilingual diversity of the United States and Canada for a number of years. Often grouped either with other Hispanics or with African Americans, Caribbean people are actually part of a complex mosaic of cultures, languages, and dress practices. The Caribbean, named after its main pre-Columbian inhabitants, the Carib, has been shaped by the encounter of several cultures, including native groups such as the Puerto Rican Taínos

Mbuti (BaMbuti) Bark Cloth

Jan-Lodewijk Grootaers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

With a general introduction on bark cloth in Africa, focusing on its wide historical and geographic distribution, including the production and embellishment of bark cloth and its other uses. The article concentrates on the bark cloth of the Mbuti, a group of peoples incorrectly called Pygmy, but properly known as Mbuti, who live in the Ituri Forest in the northeastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The Mbuti are famous for their painted bark cloth, historically used in clothing and b

Dress and Fashion Education: Design and Business

Jane E. Hegland

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Haute couture education can be traced back to Louis XIV’s court, where French fashions were promoted through fashion dolls. Early education was informal, mostly based on apprenticeships. In the nineteenth century, the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture was formed, providing a formalized education for couturiers. By 1927, the Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne emerged as a universally recognized institution. Since these beginnings, the design and business of fashion has expa

Cosmetics, Non-Western

Paula Heinonen

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Hispanic and Latino American

Josephine M. Moreno

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The heritage of Latinos living in the United States and Canada is a mixture of Spanish, Portuguese, European, Native, African, Asian, and other ancestry. Dress needs vary widely and are influenced in part by socioeconomic status, age, income, education, immigration status, faith, popular culture, and gender. Family values and faith play a significant role in Hispanic families and influence dress purchases, particularly for special occasion wear. Latinos also tend to be brand-conscious. Although a

Latin American Fashion

Regina A. Root

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Film and Fashion

Alba F. Aragón

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Attempting a full account of film and fashion in the two dozen nations of Latin America is a daunting task. The mere concept of regional and even national cinemas in Latin America is subject to debate, while the question of what Latin American fashion is has only begun to be addressed by scholars. The development of film in Latin America has been uneven and multifaceted. Often, films produced in Latin America have been purveyors of foreign fashion trends. Occasionally, they have sought to documen

Overview of the Caribbean

Steeve O. Buckridge

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Despite a shared history and similar patterns of development, the Caribbean is one of the most complex, culturally diverse regions on the globe, a result of the vast numbers of people arriving there from all over the world through the centuries. This diversity generated new cultural systems unique to the area. Consequently, the people of the Caribbean represent various ethnicities and speak several languages, from Spanish, French, Dutch, and English to indigenous and Creole tongues, including Jam

Jamaica in the Nineteenth Century to the Present

Steeve O. Buckridge

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The island of Jamaica is the third-largest nation in the Caribbean or the West Indies. The island has a population of 2.6 million people. The country’s capital, Kingston, lies at the foot of the Blue Mountains, with its highest peak reaching 7,402 feet (2,256 meters), making it the highest peak in the Caribbean. Jamaica gained its independence from Britain in 1962. However, it remains a member of the British Commonwealth and has a constitutional parliamentary democracy system with a prime ministe

Caribbean Headwear

Beverly Chico

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Since the sixteenth century, many types of headpieces have been worn by Caribbean islanders, depending on various factors including ethnicity, climate, and communal events. European colonizers usually brought and wore hats and styles from their respective countries. They generally became the ruling elite, their headwear communicating their status, and Creoles (descendants of European settlers) usually wore European styles. The headgear that arrived during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries

Trinidad in the Nineteenth Century

Dominique Heyse-Moore

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The nineteenth century saw great change on the island of Trinidad, particularly the end of slavery and the arrival of many groups of people from across the world. People from many parts of Africa, Europe, Asia, and other parts of the Americas (and their descendants) all lived there. There are many clear distinctions between the ways that different social and ethnic groups dressed; yet, these groups also began to influence each other’s dress and adapted to their new environment. Unfortunately, ver

Book chapter

Christopher Columbus encountered the island of Borinquén in 1493 during his second voyage to the New World. Columbus claimed the island for the Spanish crown by right of discovery and named it San Juan Bautista. After 1521, the capital came to be known as San Juan and the island as Puerto Rico. For the next 400 years following Columbus’ “discovery,” Puerto Rico was neglected under the control of the Spanish regime. It was under a cloud of disenchantment with the Spanish government that Puerto Ric

Visualizing Difference: The Rhetoric of Clothing in Colonial Spanish America

Mariselle Meléndez

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Walter Mignolo observes that the lack of writing along with the lack of clothing and cannibalism constituted three crucial elements often used in the construction of Amerindian images: “Not having it yet or having it in excess were two cognitive moves used by Europeans in constructing the identity of the self-same by constructing at the same time, the image of the other” (Mignolo 1992: 312). Written as well as visual texts usually contrasted the nakedness of the indigenous people with the presenc

Guayaberismo and the Essence of Cool

Marilyn Miller

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Of all animals, man is the only one who has not been granted a natural suit.

Barbadian Culture and Dress

Amanda J. Muhammad

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Barbadian dress patterns, like those of so many other Caribbean island nations, are formed from the mixing of multiple cultural configurations to produce something unlike the originals: a system of communication that reflects the island’s historical perspective. This perspective is the result of historical class, gender, and race delineations, as well as contemporary group norms, as evident in dress delineations by social standing and age. Such patterns provide evidence of individual and group re

Transvestite Pedagogy: Jacqueline and Cuban Culture

James J. Pancrazio

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

That things are not always what they seem – or that seeming itself, the mirage or camouflage, was all there was to see …

Introduction

Regina A. Root (ed)

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

When Christopher Columbus claimed the islands of Cuba, the Dominican Republic and Haiti for Spain in 1492, he initiated the conquest of the indigenous populations living in the region known today as Latin America and the Caribbean. The first images and accounts of American natives that circulated throughout Europe reveal much about a sense of awe experienced by the first colonizers. They viewed the natives’ “nakedness” with bewilderment and marveled at the presence of material goods such as cotto

Introductory Note to Latin America and the Caribbean

Margot Blum Schevill

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The vast area comprising the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America offers geographical contrasts that have significantly influenced dress. The Caribbean islands, the rainforest, the Andes, and the Atacama desert each have distinctive clothing traditions. Climate and geography have influenced garment preservation, with ancient Andean textiles surviving in the favorable Pacific coast climate, while humid conditions elsewhere have destroyed physical evidence of ancient dress. Textiles wer

Cuba

Araceli Tinajero

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Cuba is one of the largest islands of the Caribbean and enjoys tropical weather all year round. Havana, the capital, was founded by the Spanish colonizers in 1519. Since then, the city has been one of the most important ports of entrance to Latin America. Spanish and other European vessels always carried shoes and apparel of all sorts to meet the demand of colonial aristocrats, merchants, clerks, and workers. In turn, European models were imitated and then altered in order to produce original Cub

Vodou Ritual Garments in Haiti

Susan Elizabeth Tselos

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Dress is an important component within the religious and ceremonial context of Vodou worship in the country of Haiti in the West Indies. During Vodou’s religious celebrations, pilgrimages, and rituals, the status of the participants and worshippers is visually identified through the use of garments as well as other physical attributes.

Creolized Costumes for Rara, Haiti

Susan Elizabeth Tselos

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Each spring, beginning immediately at the end of Carnaval, and building in intensity during the six weeks preceding Easter, Vodou religious temples (oumfòs) in Haiti, located on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, dispatch a procession of characters that includes captains, colonels, queens, flag-bearers, and baton-twirling jugglers called majò jonc. This procession, known as Rara, is a yearly ritual of Haiti’s urban poor and the rural peasant class. Rara exists within the culture of Vodou, a sync

Dress and Dance in Puerto Rico

Raúl J. Vázquez López

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Puerto Rican dress is the result of a confluence of cultures: the native Taínos, the colonizing Spaniards, and the African slaves. From the Taínos, the early inhabitants of the island—formerly known as Borikén—to its current population—self-described as boricuas—music and dance have enjoyed a privileged position, a popularity that no other art form (i.e., theater, fine arts) has enjoyed; thus, a description of Puerto Rican dress must not ignore dance. The origins of some music styles considered P

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