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History of Dress in the Southern Cone

Carol García, Eva Medalla, Laura Novik and Regina A. Root

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Dress in the Southern Cone region, which includes Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, and the southernmost regions of Brazil and Paraguay, has traditionally blended indigenous roots and foreign influences, both of which remain prevalent in today’s fashions. Several overlapping, significant historical tendencies in the region’s dress are discussed in order to elucidate the significance of these influences and fashion trends, especially Spanish and Portuguese colonial influences, the emergence of national c

Textile Arts of the Mapuche of Chile

Grace Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The Mapuche, whose name means “people of the land,” still live close to the land and follow their traditions, which explains the survival of their culture and textiles. In pre-Hispanic times, they were nomadic fishermen and hunter-gatherers, clad in furs. After becoming farmers, they became skilled in weaving, basketry, and pottery. In the mid-fifteenth century, the powerful Inkas invaded Chile. Although unable to conquer the Mapuche, Inka influence on Mapuche culture was considerable. Among othe

Visualizing Difference: The Rhetoric of Clothing in Colonial Spanish America

Mariselle Meléndez

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Walter Mignolo observes that the lack of writing along with the lack of clothing and cannibalism constituted three crucial elements often used in the construction of Amerindian images: “Not having it yet or having it in excess were two cognitive moves used by Europeans in constructing the identity of the self-same by constructing at the same time, the image of the other” (Mignolo 1992: 312). Written as well as visual texts usually contrasted the nakedness of the indigenous people with the presenc

Military Fashion and Coup d’Etat in Chile

Carmen Oquendo-Villar

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The political deployment of media was crucial for the success of the 1973 coup in Chile in which a military junta overthrew President Salvador Allende. It was also vital for the launching of the president of the junta, Augusto Pinochet Ugarte, onto the national scene. His image—including his body image, uniforms, and accoutrements—was meticulously stage-managed in print media, film documentaries, and television images to convey political meaning and to achieve control over a chaotic social body o

Raíz Diseño—A Nongovernmental Organization

Regina A. Root

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The nongovernmental organization Raíz Diseño emerged in 2007 from a transnational network of Latin American designers formerly known as Circuito Identidades Latinas. Most designers had been working for a decade within the parameters of the Mercosur trading block to integrate local forms of knowledge and ethical business practices into the design process and, ultimately, the fashion industry. Currently based in Santiago, Chile, the organization began as the brainchild of cofounders Alex Blanch and

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