Results: Text (45) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 45 (2 pages)
    Page 1 of 2
Dirk Bikkembergs

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Jil Sander

Lauren Downing Peters

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

‘I Love My Prophet’: Religious Taste, Consumption and Distinction in Berlin

Synnøve Bendixsen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The majority of mosque associations and prayer rooms in Berlin were established by the so-called first-generation migrants who arrived as guest workers in Germany in the late 1960s and early 1970s. These religious organizations and places are mostly divided along ethno-national lines in terms of their participants, language of instruction and religious references. In contrast, the religious youth organization MJD was established in 1994 by eight young Muslims with various ethnic and national back

Adapting Georg Simmel’s classic reflections on fashion, Daniel Miller and Sophie Woodward (2007: 341-2) have suggested that the near-global ubiquity of jeans offers people different ways of negotiating the conflicting socio-cultural forces of conformity and individuality. In Woodward’s British study, for instance, using a familiar and hardly spectacular example, jeans provided a ‘relief from the burden of mistaken choice and anxious self-composition’ that women continuously felt (Miller and Woodw

Uniforms

Nigel Arch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A uniform may be defined as a prescribed set of clothing peculiar to a distinct group of individuals within a society. It is distinguished by displays of hierarchy evident on parts of the dress and will usually also display emblems that act as signals only readily interpreted by other members of the group. Hierarchy is expressed in terms of rank, and badges of rank have appeared on such elements of uniform dress as the shoulder strap and cuffs of the upper body garment. Other symbols act as remin

Pins and Rings as Head Ornaments in Early Iron Age Southwest Germany

Bettina Arnold and Sabine Hopert Hagmann

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Iron Age populations in west-central Europe used various types of personal ornament to communicate membership in a range of social categories, including gender, age, and social status. Adult women in particular made use of elaborate hairstyles as a foundation for complex sets of pins, rings, and pendants, some attached to what appear to have been veils or other forms of head covering. In southwest Germany sets of up to a dozen rings and pins have been found in burials dating between 600 and 450 B

Hoyningen-Huene, George

William Ewing

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Ionic columns rose alongside factory smoke-stacks, Greek temples alongside railroad tunnels and depots & and the ladies and gentlemen of Paris, London, New York and Biarritz enjoyed the sunshine among pedestals from which the gods of ancient Greece looked down in naked silence, between snorting stallions and muscular heroes.

Distinctive Dress of the Nazi Party

Mark Gudgel

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

This article addresses the significance and distinct aspects of uniform and dress in Nazi Germany (1933–1945), specifically related to the organization and membership of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei, the NSDAP or Nazi party. The Nazi entity is kept distinct from that of other German organizations that existed during that period to which non-Nazi German civilians may have belonged, as well as from the various branches of the German military which were populated with a very lo

Fascist and Nazi Dress

Irene Guenther

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Such reactionary, anti-Semitic, and rabidly nationalistic messages were repeated on countless occasions throughout the 1920s and early 1930s, so that by the time the Nazi Party came to power in 1933 the argument was clear. Only German clothing, specifically Aryan-designed and manufactured, was good enough for females in the Third Reich. Racially appropriate clothing depended upon the elimination of French and, especially, Jewish influences from the German fashion industry.

Germany

Irene Guenther

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

German dress in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was closely linked to French–German relations. Critics disapproved of affluent German women’s fondness for French styles. During the Napoleonic wars, German rural folk dress often featured prominently at national festivals, manifesting patriotism. Ironically, it was with the French occupation during this time that German fragmentation consolidated, bringing a sense of “Germanness.” Industrialization occurred rapidly in the German states. Afte

Lufthansa Uniforms

Regina Henkel

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Airline uniforms give an insight into the airline’s historical, economic, social, and gender-related values. They lend the otherwise-standardized flying services a distinctive appearance and enable the airlines to imbue their staff with cultural associations and emotions according to the prescribed image. From early on, the German airline, Lufthansa, focused efforts on the appearance of its employees.

The Nazi Aesthetic in Fashion

Laura Klosterman Kidd

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Adolf Hitler and the Nazi regime influence many aspects of popular culture, including fashion. The Nazi aesthetic is an artistic and ideological style created by Adolph Hitler, which characterizes the idealization of the male human form, violence, the heroic ideal, and Aryan mythology. This style was critical in the design of the Nazi machine, especially architectural and transportation design, the visual arts, politics, and the propaganda of the Third Reich. Less well documented has been the use

Lagerfeld, Karl

John S. Major

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Wristwatch

Margaret Maynard

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The wristwatch is a fascinating accessory for men and women. In the twenty-first century, it can be an important practical item, although, for many, cell phones have largely overtaken this function. Wristwatches are often mass produced, but equally they are ostentatious, stylishly engineered, deluxe accessories linked with exclusive high-fashion brands like Versace and Dior. Thus they may represent affluence and status or signal a particular occupation or a sporting activity, but they are also sy

Muslim Dress and the Head-Scarf Debate

Annelies Moors

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Debates about the presence of students wearing head scarves in public schools in West Europe started in the late 1980s; about a decade later, the employment of women wearing head scarves also became the focus of attention. These debates need to be seen within a context in which a new generation of Muslims (often second-generation migrants) started to enter the educational system and then the labor market. As new Muslim citizens, these young men and women have increasingly become socially and poli

Creating a Collection in a Big Company

Kasper Tang Vangkilde

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The creation of a fashion collection in a big fashion company is a complex cooperative process. Various people with diverse skills and experiences, such as designers, brand specialists, clothing technicians, production planners, and others, are involved in the creative process from the idea to the finished collection. HUGO BOSS, a leading European high-end fashion company, is a case in point. Because of the company’s strong product focus, each product group (for example, shirts or knitwear) is ha

The Cavaliers and the Parvenus as Imitators of the Court

Werner Sombart

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

Nothing has contributed more towards perverting our ideas of probity, candour, and disinterestedness, or turning those virtues into ridicule; nothing has more strengthened that fatal propensity to luxury, which is natural to all men, but which is become with us a second nature, by that peculiarity of temper, which makes us fasten eagerly upon everything that can gratify our passions; and nothing in particular has so greatly degraded the French nobility as the rapid and dazzling fortunes of contra

Setting the Scene

Dunja Brill

Source: Goth Culture. Gender, Sexuality and Style 2008

Book chapter

Spring 2003, Lowlife, a Goth clubnight in Brighton (England). More than a decade later I am again sitting in the corner of a smoke-filled club, watching people dance. The eerie guitar sounds have become rare over the years; the rhythms have got faster and harsher, and so have the dance styles. I spot a man with a crew cut, combat fatigues and a muscle shirt, stomping back and forth in a martial manner to the sound of distorted electronic beats. Next to him there is a girl dressed in a tight black

Subverting Gender, Gendering Subculture

Dunja Brill

Source: Goth Culture. Gender, Sexuality and Style 2008

Book chapter

Academic definitions of subculture have shifted considerably over the last four decades, with gender turning from a factor which used to be completely passed over into a central element of subcultural research. Likewise, since the feminist movement placed gender on the cultural and academic agenda in the 1970s, the meanings assigned to this concept and the ways it is applied to humanities research in particular have changed markedly.

Style and Status

Dunja Brill

Source: Goth Culture. Gender, Sexuality and Style 2008

Book chapter

Conspicuous styles with their high visibility and expressive character form one of the most important markers of subcultural affiliation. In this chapter and the two following ones, I analyse the style practices of the Goth subculture through the lens of gender, here focusing on male androgyny and female hyperfemininity in Gothic dress and the relative value of these style practices in terms of subcultural capital.

Female Style and Subjectivity

Dunja Brill

Source: Goth Culture. Gender, Sexuality and Style 2008

Book chapter

So far I have discussed male and female Gothic style in terms of status and subcultural capital, evaluating gendered Goth styles from the perspective of the general norms and values of the scene. The following two chapters focus more on the subjective meanings and functions Goths assign to their styles, starting here with an analysis of hyperfemininity as a source of personal empowerment.

Masculinity in Style

Dunja Brill

Source: Goth Culture. Gender, Sexuality and Style 2008

Book chapter

Male androgynous style has already been discussed as a major source of status and subcultural capital on the Gothic scene. Of course this view of male androgyny is limited and one-sided as it only focuses on the micropolitical level of subcultural norms or values, without taking full account of the disruptive potential which male androgyny may hold in relation to the macrostructures of power at work in society at large. We have to remember that our culture still censures androgyny in male style i

Gender Relations

Dunja Brill

Source: Goth Culture. Gender, Sexuality and Style 2008

Book chapter

While issues of style feature prominently in subcultural studies, the question of male–female relations has been sidelined by much research into subcultures and gender. Without doubt, flamboyant styles form an important facet of conspicuous subcultures in terms of gendered self-expression and deserve in-depth analysis. However, such an analysis should be coupled with an examination of actual heterosexual relations as ‘the primary site where gender difference is re-produced’ (Hollway, 2001, p. 272

Queer Sexualities

Dunja Brill

Source: Goth Culture. Gender, Sexuality and Style 2008

Book chapter

In the discursive structure of our culture, the concepts of gender and sexuality are closely linked and intertwined. Judith Butler’s (1990) notion of the heterosexual matrix with its dictate of heterosexual romance as the main sustainer of binary gender difference illustrates how ‘the discourses of gender and sexuality are entangled and mutually sustaining/informing’ (Gutterman, 2001, p. 62). Consequently, a discussion of sexualities in the Gothic subculture is a vital part of a thorough analysis

Goth Music and Media

Dunja Brill

Source: Goth Culture. Gender, Sexuality and Style 2008

Book chapter

As a music-based subculture, Goth and its gendered meanings call for an analysis of how gender is represented in Gothic music and the subcultural music press. However, there is a crucial difference between the self-representations of individual Goths in interviews or Internet forums, on the one hand, and the mediated, formally published sonic, textual and visual representations in Goth music and media, on the other hand. There exist different cultural fields in or through which the Gothic subcult

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 45 (2 pages)
Page 1 of 2